Help - New stove options?

mepellet Posted By mepellet, Oct 8, 2012 at 7:25 PM

  1. peakbagger

    peakbagger
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    Heck given the poor efficiency of a franklin stove, you could replace it with Jotul 602 and be ahead of the game. Going with any modern stove will probably cut your wood usage by a third.
     
  2. mepellet

    mepellet
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    True but I am more concerned with the safety of the install. Like I said, we intend to continue to use the pellet stove as the primary source of heat. Just trying to understand the install requirements of wood stoves.
     
  3. FyreBug

    FyreBug
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    If I were you my head would spin right now... The suggestions run from an inexpensive wood stove, an expensive one, a fireplace to a furnace. First and foremost you need to decide what your budget is. An inexpensive wood stove with chimney and install material plus labour if you have to hire someone could still cost you over $3-$4K.

    Here's your option to help narrow down your decision:
    1) Inexpensive wood stoves: Aka Englander, Drolet, etc... will put out just as much heat as an expensive one. Perhaps not the prettiest to look at but will do the job. Watch out for length of warranty and where built (Chinese built stoves tend to have less material). Cost of large stove approx $800 - $1,200. Cost of Chimney $1-$2K . Pros: Inexpensive - Cons: Only a zone heater

    2) Top tier wood stoves: May have other combustion technology such as Catalytic for longer burn. Other material such as cast iron, soapstone, thicker steel and fit & finish etc... Longer warranty as well. Approx cost of units $2K -$4k Pros: Nicer look and finish, possibly longer burn time, longer warranties - Cons: Price

    3) Fireplace: The new EPA units are basically small furnaces and throw a lot of heat. Some can even push heat into another room and have a thermostat control. Price: $3K - $6K Pros: Nice look, lot of heat, can distritbute some of that heat to other area of the house - Cons: while price of unit may be relatively low, the cost of tearing down your masonry fireplace and replacing chimney plus construction material will likely bring the whole project over $10K easily

    4) Wood furnace/add-on: Newer EPA units burn clean and have long burn times. Cost of unit $3-$5K depending on options Pros: Can distribute heat throughout the entire house using existing duct work. Full solution as primary heat. Some units can pre-heat hot water tank. Cons: Overall cost of project since an HVAC professional is also preferred to tune up your system.

    Keep in mind the cost of the appliance is only a fraction of the total install cost. You should always keep in mind the cost of the flue (black pipe) chimney, labour, material etc... need to be taken into consideration.

    Hope this helps.
     
  4. mepellet

    mepellet
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    Thanks fyrebug! Yes my head is spinning. I plan on doing the install myself. Is that typically ok with insurance companies? Do you ever need to get a permit from your town/city? We really like the corner idea especially since the existing chimney doesn't appear safe and is too large for most new stoves so I don't have to redo any of it when/if we change the stove out. Because of this I think our budget is going to only allow a cheaper stove at the moment. I priced out a new chimney using Selkirk supervent which is available at Lowes and came up with about $900 for a straight up install.
     
  5. Swedishchef

    Swedishchef
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    Nice post Fyrebug.

    mepellet: insurance companies some times want a WETT certified installer to do the job and some will allow you to do so provided you follow the specifications from the manufacturer.

    Check with your town about the requirement for a permit. Some do and some don't. Where I live they do not require a permit...

    Good luck!

    Andrew
     
  6. FyreBug

    FyreBug
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    I would check with your insurance company first. Tell them you will have your installation inspected by an NFI (National Fire Institute ) certified inspector. Make sure to download the installation manual first before buying and understand clearances and limitations. If you're not sure make sure to ask here on Hearth.com since many will be willing to help here.

    You may not have to replace your chimney. Just drop in a liner (we'll help you locate a good quality one at a reasonable price) and you should be good to go.

    All the best and ask away!
     
  7. mepellet

    mepellet
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    Thanks a ton fyrebug! I appreciate the help! What would I expect to pay for a liner? Would the existing thru wall penetration act as the thimble or would I have to rip apart the brick inside and siding outside to install a proper thimble?
    What about hearth requirements since I don't know what is under the brick. A few of the install manuals I have seen require some sort of thermal protection. No matter what stove I get I would probably have to extend the hearth either depth and/or width. And to match what is there might be difficult....
     
  8. mepellet

    mepellet
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    Oh and who would be. Nfi inspector? Local fire chief?
     
  9. FyreBug

    FyreBug
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    Follow the link, type in your zip code and it will show everyone in your area.
     
  10. begreen

    begreen
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    Same goes for cat stoves. Some need more protection than others but I can't think of one that has exceptionally high floor protection requirements.
     
  11. begreen

    begreen
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    Same goes for cat stoves. Some need just ember protection and some a bit more. I can't think of any that have very high insulation needs.

    Correct, drywall's paper is combustible and considered an unprotected wall. Here's an article on protected walls.

    http://www.hearth.com/econtent/index.php/articles/stove_wall_clear
     

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