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How do you burn when you are home?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by 69_Eliminator, Dec 6, 2013.

  1. Sprinter

    Sprinter Minister of Fire

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    How long has the poplar been split and stacked in the open? I'm a strong believer in moisture meters. It's the only way to know the moisture content of wood and it's the single most important factor in burning successfully. This Harbor Freight one is the cheapest around and has good reviews here. Try to get the wood to 20 - 25% MC before burning. You can also look on Amazon and ebay for a 2-pin meter. http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?q=moisture meter

    Here's what to look for with creosote: http://askthechimneysweep.com/2010/11/the-three-stages-of-creosote/

    If you can at all swing it, installing a stainless liner would go a long way in making your experience a safer and more enjoyable one. If you're a DIY'er it doesn't have to be expensive.

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  2. 69_Eliminator

    69_Eliminator New Member

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    It wasn't split until until about a month ago, but was cut up into logs for about six or seven months. The tree was dead when we took it down.

    I never would have thought a moisture meter would be that cheap! Thanks for the harbor freight link also! Too bad I didn't know about it when I ordered my infrared temp gun on black friday. :( I wonder if they carry it in the stores? I will have to give my local store a call to see if they have it.

    Thanks for the link on what to look for with creosote; I bookmarked the link.

    I am a DIY'r. My brother wants to put a liner in his chimney so if it goes well I may do mine also. What is the advantage of having a liner? Easier to clean, less chance of creosote build up, and/or if a chimney fire occurs it's not as dangerous? just curious.

    Thanks! :cool:
  3. 69_Eliminator

    69_Eliminator New Member

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    Awesome idea! I took the box fan out of our bedroom and moved it to the end of the hallway pointing towards my tv room where the insert is. I have the fans on the insert on high and it's not smoking hot in here. I may put another box fan in the opening of our bedroom, but the one I just moved to blow towards the tv room will be staying.

    Thanks for the idea!
  4. Sprinter

    Sprinter Minister of Fire

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  5. eclecticcottage

    eclecticcottage Minister of Fire

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    A friend of ours has an orange Eliminator clone. Those are some sick cars. Not usually the kind of cats we talk about 'round here. But I'll admit the SN and avi are one reason I clicked on the thread :p

    Standing dead doesn't mean seasoned/dry, and wood won't really start to season until after it's split and stacked where the wind and sun can get at it. And exception MIGHT be beetle kill pine, but even then we've tried fresh cut beetle kill and it doesn't burn nearly as well as the stuff that's been stacked for a while (at least 6-7 months but mostly over a year).
    gyrfalcon likes this.
  6. 69_Eliminator

    69_Eliminator New Member

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  7. 69_Eliminator

    69_Eliminator New Member

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    Well I'm glad to know that people like my SN, avatar and they attract attention to my threads! ;) You'll have to PM me some info on your friends' Eliminator clone. I have always thought the '67-'70 Cougars are sleek, sexy, tough looking muscle cars.

    Yeah I know dead doesn't necessarily mean seasoned. It was just by chance that we took these trees down this past summer. At that point I wasn't thinking about heating with wood, but financial circumstances came up, or should I say didn't come up so that's why I'm heating with mother nature this year. Trust me, I will be much better prepared for next winter if I choose to continue heating with wood.
  8. 69_Eliminator

    69_Eliminator New Member

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    Is it bad to throw wood on a hot fire and not let it burn down?
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2013
  9. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    No. I am home all day and do it all the time. Some say you use more wood but I burn the same amount in the same amount of time if I stuff the thing or if I burn two splits at a time all day long. Two burn better together than just dropping one split on coals and keep good clean flame going.

    Figure two hours per medium split. Every day of the week.
    gyrfalcon and 69_Eliminator like this.
  10. 69_Eliminator

    69_Eliminator New Member

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    I was thinking that if I kept the fire hot I could put large splits on and maybe use less wood that way. What do you guys think. Or do people mainly only use large splits for over-night or if they are going to leave for a few hours?
  11. Nick Mystic

    Nick Mystic Minister of Fire

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    Here is the 350Z I picked up a couple of years ago:

    IMG_0156a.jpg

    IMG_0216.jpg
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 6, 2013
    firefighterjake likes this.
  12. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    You will use about the same amount of wood either way. The stuff has the same amount of BTUs in it no matter how you burn it to keep the stove and the joint warm.
    gyrfalcon and 69_Eliminator like this.
  13. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    dafattkidd likes this.
  14. 69_Eliminator

    69_Eliminator New Member

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    Makes perfect sense to me. Thanks for the sharing that piece of knowledge! ==c
  15. Sprinter

    Sprinter Minister of Fire

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    Very similar to what I often do. It's also easier to control the stove temp that way on the warmer days or when you just need a warmup, and minimize any waste from using more than you need.
  16. Oregon aloha

    Oregon aloha Feeling the Heat

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    If your wood is less then perfect, burn small and hot as you want to dry out that moisture. A cool fire will leave more deposits in your flue. The thermal mass around your stove will also help to moderate your heat and keep your room warm well after your fire has gone.
  17. gyrfalcon

    gyrfalcon Minister of Fire

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    A load of small splits burns hotter and faster than the same amount in large splits. Same BTU, but just distributed differently over time.
  18. gyrfalcon

    gyrfalcon Minister of Fire

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    Indeed, so I'm guessing he's talking about powder, not glossy.
  19. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    You can burn without the fan just fine, to help regulate the heat. As long as the stove does not start getting too hot, the fan is just a tool to circulate more heat out away from the insert and get it out around the house more.
    Your not wasting the fuel so to speak. Just regulating temps as you want for comfort.
  20. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Nice car Nick . . . big fan of Japanese sport cars myself. Never had one . . . but some day . . . some day.

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