How many cord?

1750 Posted By 1750, Jan 16, 2014 at 10:33 PM

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  1. 1750

    1750
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    Apr 21, 2013
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    I saw this picture today. How amazing and gorgeous.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. gzecc

    gzecc
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    Sep 24, 2008
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    I've been there too. Could you imagine the look on the faces of the first europeans to see these trees!
     
  3. MrWhoopee

    MrWhoopee
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    Sep 27, 2011
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    I hear it's about as good as cottonwood. Not worth the trouble. rotflmao.gif
     
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  4. 1750

    1750
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    Apr 21, 2013
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    The first anypeans to see those trees.

    I trust everyone knows my reference to cords in this context is just an excuse to post an amazing picture. These trees are both iconic and sacred.
     
  5. ErikR

    ErikR
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    Oct 12, 2013
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    Well lets see... The volume of a cylinder is pi X radius squared X height.. Skip the use of inches and use feet for all measurements, divide your volume (cubic feet) by 128..... easy

    And, yes, I figured you were not serious, but the math is... I've motorcycled my way out to the coast with the goal of seeing the giant trees. They are amazing!
     
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  6. Catfish Cleatus

    Catfish Cleatus
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    Feb 23, 2013
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    One will never know because the Feds would put you in jail before you could buck it up.
     
  7. 1750

    1750
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    And well they should, Catfish. And well they should.
     
  8. MrWhoopee

    MrWhoopee
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    My understanding is that their size is what saved them from the lumber machine. Once on the ground, the only way to reduce them to manageable pieces was by blasting. Losses exceeded 90%. It just wasn't profitable. There is a God.
     
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  9. 1750

    1750
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    Similarly, I have also read that in felling them the tremendous mass of the tree fractured much of the timber on impact. As you've suggested, this is probably the only thing that saved them from the maw of the lumber boom. Here in my own Michigan, the giant pines weren't so lucky and nearly all of the forests was left denuded like a cornfield after harvest.

    I was also surprised to read recently that these ancient giants continue to grow, and in fact, are believed to be growing at a much faster rate than younger trees. I was always under the impression that trees grew more quickly early in their lives. http://www.npr.org/2014/01/16/262479807/old-trees-grow-faster-with-every-year
     
  10. Jon1270

    Jon1270
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    Only in height. Of course when you cut up a log you find that the most recent rings are just as thick as the oldest ones, and with far larger circumferences.
     
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  11. ClintonH

    ClintonH
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    Jan 4, 2014
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    Another question: imagine the saw needed to do the job. :eek:
     
  12. Firewood Bandit

    Firewood Bandit
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    A buddy of mine is a level C feller and has worked forest fires. He has cut down Douglas Firs and Redwoods on fires, (nothing over 6-7' diameter). He said they make a satisfying crash when they hit the ground and small 3' diameter trees are busted into splinters.
     
  13. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake
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    I thought it was the Na'vi that saved them. Guess I should have paid better attention in history class. ;)
     
  14. Cold Is Dumb

    Cold Is Dumb
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    Jul 28, 2013
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    That's what I've heard as well. Hey come on, we are on a firewood forum... :p

    But yeah, that looks like General Sherman, it's on my bucket list.
     
  15. MrWhoopee

    MrWhoopee
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    Sounds like a guy who is just average. ;)

    I was informed that the process is felling, but the person who does it is a faller. Probably varies by locality.
     
  16. Firewood Bandit

    Firewood Bandit
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    He is far from average. Last week we did a tree job, one popular (24" DBH) was leaning towards a house. A box elder was leaning over the house at a 30 angle. I wouldn't even consider cutting it myself.

    The feller/faller vernacular always makes me sound like a cretin.
     
  17. Hills Hoard

    Hills Hoard
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    Mar 19, 2013
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    How old would that thing be??!?!?....
     
  18. 1750

    1750
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    Apr 21, 2013
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    Per the omniscient Wikipedia, the General Sherman redwood is between 2300-2700 years old.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Sherman_(tree)

    So this tree had at least a couple of centuries under its belt before Jesus was even a twinkle. This is just staggering to me, and really a challenge to get my brain around.

    And, it's continuing to add mass as I type this!
     
  19. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck
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    There are some sequoias that aren't in the national parks, so I bet somebody out there has burned some in a stove. It is probably like cedar. There must be lots of people who burn Redwood, which grow in more populous areas and are a lot more widespread than Giant Sequoias.
     
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