1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

How much kindling?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Adam_MA, Jul 14, 2009.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Adam_MA

    Adam_MA New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2009
    Messages:
    97
    Loc:
    MA
    Just wondering how much kindling you folks store for the winter. I have been picking up the nice thin slices of wood, and little left over bits every time I had to move my splitter this year, and threw them all in a pile. They finally got all nice and dry, so I started throwing them into cheap 34 gallon storage containers I picked up at K-mart on sale. Well, I filled 2 of them right to the top, and still have a bit left over to pick up still. I figure once it is all picked up, I will have the equivalent of about an 80-90 gallon container full.

    I'm going to pick it up either way, and it will all get burnt sometime, but it just got me wondering about how much everyone else stores for the winter.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. stee6043

    stee6043 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Messages:
    2,303
    Loc:
    West Michigan
    You've got a lot more than I will! I am doing the same as you as far as picking up under the splitter. I'll jam three or four 5 gallon buckets full and that'll be about it for me. I doubt I'll make it the whole year but I'll be a lot better off than I was last year....
  3. Adam_MA

    Adam_MA New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2009
    Messages:
    97
    Loc:
    MA
    That's the part that worried me. Last year was my first with my stove, and I bought my wood. I ended up spending a bunch of time in the basement with a hatchet getting the kindling I needed from day to day. I wanted to avoid having to play that game again.
  4. stejus

    stejus Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Messages:
    1,227
    Loc:
    Central MA
    Kindling is used primarily when your starting a fire from nothing. Once you start burning 24x7, there's no need for kindling IMO. I guess that depends on your stove size too to have enough coals in the AM to start it up again.
  5. Adam_MA

    Adam_MA New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2009
    Messages:
    97
    Loc:
    MA
    That's true, but I find it much faster to throw a small handful of kindling on top of the coals and then some sticks on top of that to get the fire back alive more quickly.
  6. trafick

    trafick Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2008
    Messages:
    139
    Loc:
    Lynchburg, VA
    When I had an open fire place, I used ALOT of kindling. Fires every weekend. I would bring home pallets from work and cut/chop them up. Since I put a gas stove in the fire place I barely burn any kindling at all. Like stejus, I now only use it for start-up three or four times a year.
  7. stee6043

    stee6043 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2008
    Messages:
    2,303
    Loc:
    West Michigan
    For those of us running gassers with storage we have to start a new fire from scratch every day. So I do go through a fair amount of kindling.....and newspaper!
  8. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    27,990
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    Lots of start and burn down fires here with our climate. No matter how much kindling I store up I end up making more by the time I am mid-way through the season.

    I would probably be better off just using starters like SuperCedars but have been in the kindling habit for ages.
  9. quads

    quads Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,746
    Loc:
    Central Sands, Wisconsin
    You can never have too much kindling. It's nice to be able to add a few pieces every time the fire burns down to coals, when reloading. Helps to get it going quicker than full size splits alone. You can always save any left over for the next season.

    I used to collect all the little pieces and shavings from the splitting process, but I found it to be much more exercise and very rewarding to split all of my kindling. Still, if I see a few nice pieces leftover from splitting the firewood, I'll usually throw them on the kindling pile. I split kindling from my seasoned oak firewood, using a single bit 3.5# ax. I choose the straightest splits from the woodpile, with the fewest knots, then place them on top of a stump and turn them into kindling.

    Here's a picture of my kindling pile:
    [​IMG]



    And here's a picture of my kindling workstation:
    [​IMG]
  10. wendell

    wendell Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2008
    Messages:
    2,026
    Loc:
    Madison, WI
    Nice wagon! I have the same one but unfortunately bent the frame trying to move 3 150 lb rounds down a sloped hill. Now, it always wants to travel a little sideways.

    I used to split up my splits to have enough kindling for the year. This year I found a hardwood lumbar yard that was giving away a pallet of pecan boards that were defective. I now have a face cord of kindling, which along with some SuperCedars should last me for many years.
  11. billb3

    billb3 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    3,471
    Loc:
    SE Mass
    I've never reallly kept track of how much kindling.

    I'm surrounded by acres of white pine.
    The bottom branches of which (are quite dead) and make for nice kindling.

    Either by going out and cutting them off, or grabbing a few from piles of branches from cut down trees.


    I have piles of branches all over.
    Some years I chip them for mulch (easier when they are green), right now I need a new engine for my chipper , so I have lots of kindling.
  12. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2008
    Messages:
    3,793
    Loc:
    NNJ
    Quads, What or where the heck is Mare Imbrium? Am I showing my ignorance?
  13. quads

    quads Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,746
    Loc:
    Central Sands, Wisconsin
    On the Moon! I haven't posted in a long time. I moved back from there now (hee hee). Guess maybe I'll have to update my profile.
  14. quads

    quads Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,746
    Loc:
    Central Sands, Wisconsin
    That wagon ranks as one of the worst purchases I ever made in my life. The wheel bearings went bad (figure that, by just pulling it around the yard), part of the steering mechanism broke off and I had to weld it back together, etc..........all for an $80 purchase price. Now it's used only for kindling and occasionally leaves. For real firewood duty I use my wheelbarrow, little Harbor Freight trailer behind the ATV, or my pickup truck.
  15. Swamp Yankee

    Swamp Yankee New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2008
    Messages:
    20
    Loc:
    Swamps of RI
    We use about a trashcan +/- full of broken sticks etc every month during the heating season. We start the woodstove every night and start the garn every other night. The woodstove uses more kindling than the garn. We gather the branches that fall off the oak/maples in our woods in the fall/winter storms and pile them on rocks, pallets, stumps etc in the woods to keep them off the ground. Every once in a while we'll head out there with some adult beverages, break up the sticks and fill up a trashcan. You'd be surprised at how much wood gets knocked down in a wind storm.
  16. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    15,072
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    Last year I was paranoid about running out of kindling to get the fire going . . . and since I originally planned to mainly have just evening and weekend fires I wanted plenty of kindling on hand so I stockpiled a little less than half a cord of kindling . . . mostly cedar and spruce kindling that I cut and split from trees that were standing dead or were dead, but off the ground.

    Since I ended up being more of a 24/7 woodburner I only used a small fraction of that amount -- maybe 1/3 of the amount.

    Besides stockpiling the cedar and spruce kindling that I specifically split up for kindling I also had quite the collection of pallets split up into kindling, scrap wood from various wood working/renovation projects, some splitter "trash" and even several bags of large pine cones that dropped in the Fall for use as kindling.
  17. Shipper50

    Shipper50 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2007
    Messages:
    604
    Loc:
    Indiana
    I posted this in another post of mine and figured I have about 2.5 times this much in bags. Its all Ash with a moisture of around 18-20%. I can always cut it smaller, but if I keep my fire hot at all I can throw a few pieces on and be ready to go.

    Shipper

    Attached Files:

  18. mayhem

    mayhem Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 8, 2007
    Messages:
    1,938
    Loc:
    Peru, MA
    I've been cutting up all the brush that came down in the Dec ice storm to kindling. Just a bunch of sticks and such and it'll help me keep more of my nice split wood. As said above, save as much as you can. You'll use a big pile in the fall and another big pile in the spring when you're lighting the stive every morning or every other morning, you'll use almost none in winter.
  19. boostnut

    boostnut Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    Messages:
    216
    Loc:
    central IL
    Looks like Shipper50 uses a similar source for his kindling. Aside from the little bits and pieces I get from running the splitter I have a neighbor in the custom cabinet building business. They generate a huge amount of scrap which makes perfect kindling. If you've got a cabinet shop in the area I suggest stopping buy and getting a load of their cutoffs and scrap. Most of the shops in this area pay to put their scraps in a dumpster or pile it up and burn it in the back lot on occasion. I go thru about a 55 gallon drum of splitter droppings and another 55 gallon drum of cabinet shop cutoffs per year.
  20. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2008
    Messages:
    6,770
    Loc:
    Syracuse NY
    A box of split 2 by cutoffs makes the wife happy when she gets home first and we are 9 or 10 hours into a burn. I make sure the box is never empty.
  21. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2008
    Messages:
    7,343
    Loc:
    NW Ontario
    I split one or two 5 gallon pails of kin'lin at a time. I use 4 or 6 pieces to start a fire and how long a pail lasts depends on how often I start a fire.

    [​IMG]
  22. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    While doing the yearly splitting, I also make some kindling. I use soft maple for the kindling because it lights very easy and burns hot. We don't require a lot of kindling simply because it is only for a short time in fall and spring when it is needed. Other times the stove is kept going 24 hours per day.

    The kindling we use is about the same size as LLigetfa's. I usually just stack it in the ends of the rows of firewood that is stacked. Sometimes I will mix some right in the regular stack if the ends won't hold it all. Sometimes my wife will also pick up the chips and little pieces after the splitting is done. I usually end up throwing that in the stove when we just need a little bit of heat because I don't like it for kindling. But whatever works.

    As to how much kindling, I really don't have a handle on that. I just make some every year. If it looks like we are running low I'll make more or if we have lots I'll make less. It is extremely easy to make nice kindling with a hydraulic splitter. I think sometime I shall take some pictures to show how I do it.
  23. WES999

    WES999 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2008
    Messages:
    888
    Loc:
    Mass north of Boston
    There is a place around the corner form me that gives away lots of skids, they are all hardwood ( oak I think).
    I have been cutting them up and storing them in the basement. They work great for starting fires.
    I am going to stock up as much as I can.

    Attached Files:

  24. Spikem

    Spikem Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2008
    Messages:
    248
    Loc:
    Middleboro, MA, USA
    No worries about nails? I would think you would NOT want them in the stove.
  25. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    27,990
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    Nails in the stove don't hurt a thing. Just scoop them out with the ashes.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page