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ID this split please

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by TimJ, Dec 27, 2012.

  1. TimJ

    TimJ Minister of Fire

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    Two pictures of the bark on a couple of splits..........what kind of wood is it ?

    Attached Files:

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  2. schlot

    schlot Minister of Fire

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    Looks like some aspen I just collected.
  3. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    Aspen 60% sure ,
    30% possibility birch,
    10% cottonwood.
  4. schlot

    schlot Minister of Fire

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    I wonder how other Cottonwoods look when split? I have a bunch of Eastern I split last year and it's not as stringy as the Elm I have, but it's definitely not as smooth as what's shown.
  5. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran Minister of Fire

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    I thought Aspen only grew above 6,000' elevation?
  6. schlot

    schlot Minister of Fire

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    They are part of the popular tree species...so is Cottonwood, and are native here at 1400'.
  7. DanCorcoran

    DanCorcoran Minister of Fire

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    Wikipedia:

    "In the western United States, this tree rarely survives at elevations lower than 1,500 feet (460 m) due to the mild winters experienced below that elevation, and is generally found at 5,000–12,000 feet (1,500–3,700 m)."


    This is what I was remembering (regarding quaking aspen), from my time in Colorado. I didn't realize it grew at lower elevations to the east, including northern Nebraska and Indiana. Live and learn!
  8. schlot

    schlot Minister of Fire

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    Interesting, we have a lot of the Popular family, cottonwood, bigtooth aspen and quaking aspen. A lot of windbreaks are aspen.
  9. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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    About 400 feet here,
    aspen in the lot across the street ;)
  10. nrford

    nrford Minister of Fire

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    It grows nearly everywhere in Michigan, 600' to 1800' . And that is Aspen you have in the OP. I once had a tour guide at the Grand Canyon try to tell his guests that aspen only grew in the Rockies, I had to take a few minutes to educate him a little bit, took a bit but after explaining my background he came around. ;)
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  11. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

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    Poplar aka aspen aka popple.
    I wouldn't go out of my way for it . . . but it is useful for shoulder season fires or for burning down the coals.
  12. WhitePine

    WhitePine Feeling the Heat

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    Not poplar. Not Tulip Poplar anyway. It has a greenish streak inside.
  13. bogydave

    bogydave Minister of Fire

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  14. thewoodlands

    thewoodlands Minister of Fire

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    Looks like a bigtooth aspen (we're about 1000 feet, have them growing all over).

    zap
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  15. WoodyJ

    WoodyJ New Member

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    Sure looks like wild black cherry tree of Ga to me. I love the smell of that in my fire.
  16. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck Minister of Fire

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    The wood looks like Aspen (poplar) to me. Bigtooth Aspen and Quaking Aspen both grow at all elevations here in PA and I think throughout the east. They are not related to Tulip Poplar, which is not a true poplar in the genus Populus. I'd guess bigtooth aspen because of the orange color of the bark.
  17. Applesister

    Applesister Minister of Fire

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    The photo to the right looks exactly like the Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides)that I have growing here in NY. I burn these woods because of woodlot management practices. I dont mind what some might deem as wasted effort. I accept it as biodiversity. The upper limbs almost feel like they have a wax coating on them. Wicked fast growing sun loving creatures.
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  18. Applesister

    Applesister Minister of Fire

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    Yeah the picture on the left...the orange...Im not sure.
  19. WoodPorn

    WoodPorn Minister of Fire

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    Bigtooth quaking tulip cottonpopple
    Fifelaker and Brewmonster like this.
  20. ohlongarm

    ohlongarm Minister of Fire

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    Yellow birch.
  21. Fifelaker

    Fifelaker Feeling the Heat

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    100% positive on what we call poplar in Mi.
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  22. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Tulip, aka yellow poplar is in a different league altogether.
  23. TimJ

    TimJ Minister of Fire

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    This is a tree I cut down in August and posted it as a beech. Backwoods Savage and a few others said it was popple at the time and I and a few others were convinced it was a beech. I posted this thread of the splits because I myself began to realize it was not a beech after it started seasoning. How this lonestar aspen got into my woods in this region will be a mystery. Live and learn :oops:
    Thanks to all that posted
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  24. ohlongarm

    ohlongarm Minister of Fire

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    Not much of a mystery,probably was deposited by migrating birds doing what birds do frequently. How did fish get in a swamp in my woods in the middle of no where?Many different species at that.
    Backwoods Savage likes this.

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