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Installer Said Outside Air Kit Not Necessary?????

Post in 'The Pellet Mill - Pellet and Multifuel Stoves' started by Drew1024, Aug 3, 2008.

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  1. JBlank912

    JBlank912 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2008
    Messages:
    132
    Loc:
    NW NJ
    Its so odd that the issue of the OAK seems to keep going around and around. Also that many installers say you don't need it. W ehad our stove installed this year and I insisted on an OAK. The installer didn't have it so he put the stove in without it. I ran for a few weeks with out it. The stove ran fine but my wife said she had a slight odor from it even after a couple of weeks. Now that the OAK is in, there is no odor (and my wife has a very sensitive snse of smell) and I feel the stove is running better - hotter and more consistent. It could all be a coincidence of the time frame and the fact that he tweaked the vent install at the same time but I am pleased that I had it installed. My house is 40 years old but with 2 additions and extra insulation as well as all new windows its reasonably tight. :coolsmile:

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  2. Xena

    Xena Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Messages:
    2,491
    Loc:
    South Shore MA
    I went the first three years without outside air.
    My home was built in the 50's. I had replacement
    windows installed a couple years ago and the doors
    weatherstripped.

    The problem with drawing air from inside the house
    is, you are creating a draft at floor level from the stove
    taking in the air. If you don't believe it,
    lay on the floor in front of the stove and you will feel it.
    This year I added an outside air kit and no more draft.
    Before, the room would sometimes be very warm but my feet
    would be cold if I sat in there for awhile.
    I'm now a big advocate of the outside air and will install
    it from the get go if I put another stove in.
  3. cac4

    cac4 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2008
    Messages:
    376
    Loc:
    Essex County, MA
    what moisture?

    the cold outside air is dryer than the air inside your house.
  4. insuranceman1

    insuranceman1 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2008
    Messages:
    36
    Loc:
    MD
    Yes when it is not raining or snowing. I may be wrong I do not know, this is why I am asking...wouldn't the OAK pull damp air in as well?
  5. cac4

    cac4 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2008
    Messages:
    376
    Loc:
    Essex County, MA
    yeah, so?

    its still probably dryer than the air in your house. Humidity is relative to the temperature of the air. It might be raining outside at 35 degrees/100% humidity. Bring a bucket of that air into your 70 degree house, and it immediately becomes 50% humidity...not that damp. same amount of moisture (water).

    suck that same air into a fire that is how hot?
    its gonna be boney-dry in there.
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