Is it safe, to dry logs in front of stove?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Phoenix Hatchling, Feb 3, 2013.

  1. Phoenix Hatchling

    Phoenix Hatchling
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    With an insert, the only radiant heat I get is right in front of the glass. Also the distribution blower blows forward from above the door. Realizing that there is space in front of and around the stove that must be free of combustibles, can I still stand up a few logs in front of the window? It would be around 15 inches in front of the glass front, and only with the door shut. The way I see it, if paper burns at 451 degrees, there is no way that the surface temp could ever even come close to that---- or am I wrong?
     
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  2. raybonz

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    I have done it but don't recommend it.. Always maintain your clearance to combustibles..

    Ray
     
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  3. topoftheriver

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    I have a rack on the hearth to the side of the stove about two feet. The radiation does a nice job on these but they are dry anyway. I also keep a spray bottle of water and a fire extinguisher is nearby. Never had to use them. I keep some wood in the garage and some in the basement. It dries pretty well in both locations. I don't put any in front of the glass.
     
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  4. raybonz

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    Just keep an eye on it and you should be OK.. I will do this is some snow blows into the wood shelter but I make sure the wood can't fall against the stove if it does fall over.. We have cats here and they like to rub against things..

    Ray
     
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  5. realstihl

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    I have a log rack to the side of the stove about 6' or so away. I have been known to set a small fan up to blow dry the wood. It works well.
     
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  6. elmoleaf

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    The idea is ok in theory but not in practice. Its hard to keep an eye on things....you forget, get sidetracked by an errand, the tv etc. Or your children or a pet knock it over.
    Like others do, farther away is better....generally winter indoor humidity gets pretty low, so stuff usually dries off quickly no matter where you put it.
     
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  7. topoftheriver

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    The wood doesn't last long enough to be that worried. Constantly refilling it. When I grab a piece it never seems warm, just dry.
     
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  8. Beer Belly

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    I'm leaving some unseasoned Ash (18-20%) on the Hearth about 3 inches from the side to help it maybe dry a bit before putting it in.....the wood feels warm, but nowhere near "hot"...the side of the stove right now is 348*...top at 500*......not something I would do with seasoned stuff, not worth the chance, I doubt my unseasoned Ash is in any danger....I hope:oops:
     
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  9. gerry100

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    1.Radiant heat effects decrease with the inverse square rule so mtwicwe moving the wood twice as far away will reduce the energy by 75%.So movingit back a little will make a big difference.

    2. Radiant heat only hits the side of the wood facing the stove so it's not doing much good anyway as far as drying.

    3. Circulation of warm dry air around the wood is what works, so putting it a few feet away where the hot air is circulating out of the insert will get you the best drying. The added benefit is that any moisture out of the wood is circulted thru the space countering the dry air issues form woodheat.
     
  10. andybaker

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    My daughter has a friend that decided to heat with wood. Didn't watch his clearances and caught the drywall on fire. It was a small bungalow, total loss. I would respect the suggested clearances.
     
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  11. Phoenix Hatchling

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    This brings up another point, and that is how to bring moisture back into the air, since putting a pot of water on top is not an option with an insert. The pieces of wood and what moisture comes out of it, doesn't come close to the 10 gallons of water I need to put through the upstairs humidifiers.
     
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  12. danham

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    The reason the air in your home gets dry when you use your stove is not because the stove is drying it. It's because your stove is drawing dry air from outdoors. So as long as your wood is in the path of that air and exposed to relatively warm temps inside your home, it will dry faster than sitting otudoors. No need to risk a fire by stacking it too close to the insert.

    -dan
     
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  13. topoftheriver

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    I know of some that run humidifiers. I keep a cast iron cauldron on top of the oslo and go through about 3 gallons a day during high burning. I agree with Dan about stacking wood too close but there are some safe distances that still keep it convenient.
     
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  14. Butcher

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    If I have some wood that gets rained on or is buried ina snow bank, this is the best way I''ve found to dry it out. A small 8" fan blowing on it for about 6 to 8 hours.
    IMG_1718.JPG
     
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  15. TheBaron

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    Very creative! You must have an area attached to your home (garage) that makes this practical. We have a frigid detached garage and our wood is so dirty I'm only bringing a day or so into the house.

    Maybe a bigger firewood rack if the better half doesn't mind me taking over the hearth room.

    I generally don't keep anything on the hearth that is considered combustible.


     
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  16. nate379

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    I have a wood bin that holds a couple days worth of wood... all depending on outside temps. The wood is usually thawed out and fairly dry by then. If not, oh well, the stove doesn't care about a little bit of ice or snow. It's not like I'm dumping in 6" of snow in the thing.
     
  17. Butcher

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    It's called a basement round here.:) Thats where the stove is so thats where the wood goes.
     
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  18. jdp1152

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    I do it every day, but pull them away if I'm not going to be in that room.
     
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  19. jdp1152

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    and when I do, I don't stack a bunch. Just three of four splits on the hearth and maybe a few more on top of that. Certainly not a true stack by any means. Almost always the next load or rotation to get a few loads some exposure. I have a humidistat and you'd be surprised how much moisture it puts in a room...even with dry wood.
     
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  20. nate379

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    If I had a basement I'd likely own a wood boiler and use my floor heat.. and keep the winter's supply of wood in the basement.

     
  21. dave_376

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    I have done the same
     
  22. savageactor7

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    We've been laying wet splits under the stove since the bi-centennial. Sometimes even hot coals fall on 'em...meh! That's reason #1 why we'll always have a stove with legs.
     
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  23. Ehouse

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    Be careful with bark-on wood. Ironwood bark Ive noticed makes excellent tinder, and Birch of course.
     
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