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  1. metalsped

    metalsped Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2011
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    236
    Loc:
    Quabbin Woods

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  2. peakbagger

    peakbagger Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2008
    Messages:
    1,718
    Loc:
    Northern NH
    If you search the site for Jotul 606 you will find some comments. I have one in my basement in storage that I inherited. They put put out a lot of heat for their size and would be great for a camp where someone needs a fast lightoff and a lot of heat for a small footprint. Unfortunately they were ill suited for the average american woodburner of the seventies. They are designed to burn hot and with some inlet air with dry wood. If they were run the traditional american method of jamming them full of wood before going to bed with the damper closed, they were very effective in producing large amounts of creosote. Many folks would have to clean the stove and the chimney several times a season or ended up with chimney fires. If run properly they generally need to be relit every day as they dont leave much if any of a coal bed overnight. The firebox is very small with no place to leave ash so they need to be cleaned frequently (just like the 602) leading to the potential issue of soring hot ash.

    One other thing to note is the flue pipe is puny, its either 4 or 5 " diameter. I dotn think they were ever EPA ceritifed.

    I believe Jotul pulled them off the US market rather then try to educate the users even though they were on the market for a much longer time in Europe.

    One of these days I want to set mine up for a spring and fall stove for taking the chill off the house.

    I am looking for a manual for mine, I did find a parts breakdown but to date havent found a manual.

    The price in the Ebay posting appears to be high for me but it all comes down to what someone is willing to pay. I believe the same stove has beens posted several times over the last few years.
  3. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,657
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    It should have a 120mm (~4.8") collar which can easily be adapted up to 6". The stove shouldn't be hard to run with a decent flue, but will need to be reloaded every few hours. This one looks to be in very good shape. They command a good price in this condition.
  4. metalsped

    metalsped Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2011
    Messages:
    236
    Loc:
    Quabbin Woods
    Yeah in reading it seemed unless you ran them hot, it was a pretty poor design for US burners (the majority). I just think it LOOKS awesome... have never seen anything like it.

    If it was a best of both worlds scenario.. Id snap it up. My wife couldnt believe such a stove existed.
  5. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,657
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Yes, this stove was not meant to stoke and smolder like many folks ran their old airtights.

    Decades back, several companies had high rise additions on their stoves to extract and radiate more heat. One still does. Take a look at the Morso 2B classic if you like this style.

    http://www.morsona.com/index.php/classic-stoves/morso-2b-classic.html
  6. metalsped

    metalsped Burning Hunk

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2011
    Messages:
    236
    Loc:
    Quabbin Woods
    Would such a stove, even modern, have the same "limitations" as the old Jotul?
  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,657
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    I'm not sure it was a big limitation. If you put a stack robber on a pre-EPA stove it helps to run it a little hotter. FWIW, I burn our old 602 a little hot so that it burns cleaner.

    But to be honest, I can't answer the question about how the modern, EPA version burns with the exchanger. I would expect it to be much less an issue. With a good drafting flue system, the stove should burn much cleaner, avoiding soot build up in the top exchanger. This was the primary reason for burning the 606 a bit hotter.
  8. peakbagger

    peakbagger Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2008
    Messages:
    1,718
    Loc:
    Northern NH
    FYI, someone has a 606 for sale on ebay, They are decided optimistic on price!

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