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Jotul c550 Rockland tips thread

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by rockreid, Oct 6, 2008.

  1. J.Stempel

    J.Stempel New Member

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    Thanks. Figured that was the case but wasn't certain.

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  2. degkop

    degkop New Member

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    Just purchased a used Rockland 550 and I have a question about the Skamol Panels (part no# 93 on the parts diagram). When I removed the baffle plates from my unit, there weren't any separate parts above the baffles. Since the unit is a 2008 and I got it used, I wasn't sure if I am missing the two panels, the panels are integrated into the baffle plates, or if my older model didn't come with the Skamol panels. Anybody ever replace these panels? Would there be any reason to remove them? Thanks.
  3. topoftheriver

    topoftheriver Member

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    Have you tried to download the user's manual and schematics from Jotul"s site? The PDF file will show you every screw, bolt, part, etc. Then you can determine what may be missing. If parts are missing you can get them at http://jotulparts.com. You will have to page through to find the exact parts you may require.

    As for the window, I have been burning in an Oslo 500 for a couple of years and my glass has been dirty. I had notice last winter that the back of the baffle was broken and flames were going up the back of the stove directly into the chimney. That is one cause of a dirty window. When the baffle works correctly, it redirects the heat around the front of the stove and through the secondary burners which act in a torch like manner which creates a flow that burns the carbon off the glass automatically and keeps it as clean as possible. You will still need to clean it with creosote cleaner now and then. Green wood could be part of the problem but green wood is primarily a heat problem not so much as a dirty window problem although if the temperature is not hot enough the window will not self clean. I would say minimally at 400 F to do an adequate job. That is all for now. Just my take on it. Others here can provide different views. Together we all work it out somehow.
  4. degkop

    degkop New Member

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    @topoftheriver - Thanks for the suggestion about the website, but it appears that the user manual on the Jotul Website is for the current model, not mine. I was able to find a 2008 version of the manual and my 2008 model does not have the Skamol panels. Must have added them after 2008. Thanks again.
  5. terpsucka

    terpsucka Member

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    Loc:
    Potomac, Maryland
    Hey all-- does anyone have any advice on how to a) access the zipper holes, and b) get to the inside of the slide assembly? I'm a little nervous about just pulling parts out and removing bolts without knowing what I'm doing. I have the owners manual but it doesn't help at all beyond the basics. It appears to me, to get to the slide assembly, I need to pull off the facade that covers the slider, but I don't know how to do this. Any info (in addition to the many, many pages of awesomeness this thread has already provided!!) would be appreciated.
  6. JTP11

    JTP11 Member

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    Without just turning the blower on full blast, what are you guys using to clean the dust out of the top of the firebox? You know, in between the shroud and firebox.
  7. newcomtd

    newcomtd New Member

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    I'm a newbie to the world of wood burning but I have some experience with construction. That was not furnace cement that you used on your flue connection. It was fireblock sealant, which is designed to seal penetrations in fire walls (wires, pipes) to keep fire from spreading too fast. This product isn't meant to be heated over and over again. It is intended to give people a little longer to escape in the event of a structure fire. I'm not sure what the correct product would be to seal the flue connection.
  8. degkop

    degkop New Member

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    Terpsucka, if you end up taking the air control apart, post some pictures of your project. I am having trouble keeping my 2008 stove from overburning and suspect that the gasket on the slider is letting air in. I'm getting temps well over 800 degrees regularly and can't seem to keep it under control with the air adjustments. I limit the amount of wood I pack in there, but my burn times suffer.
  9. Ansky

    Ansky Member

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    Thanks for the heads up. I actually re-did it this summer with furnace cement. So hopfully that will work better.
  10. EJL923

    EJL923 Feeling the Heat

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    FYI, I bought my stove in 2009 and it only had the cast iron baffles.

    As far as the air control, there are three bolts on the inside behind the intake, two on sides and one top middle. In my case, the air intake mod didnt help much with burn times.
  11. Soundchasm

    Soundchasm Feeling the Heat

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    I stole one of my wife's Swiffer things to use when it was cool, but it certainly didn't turn out "like new", and it didn't go in very far. If that's the part we can see, I gotta' wonder about what we can't!
  12. degkop

    degkop New Member

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    Buckingham PA
  13. degkop

    degkop New Member

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    Do you find that the stove gets too hot? I bought my 2008 stove used and can't pack it full without it running away from me. I routinely get into the 800's and have 4 hour burns. Is it time to get the baffles with the firebricks?
  14. EJL923

    EJL923 Feeling the Heat

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    Its a very leaky stove, lots of intake air to control, but only one lever to do it. Baffles with firebricks wont help. I made a secondary air adjuster last year, but haven't had time to play around with it. Temps in the 800's isn't uncommon for this stove, just search thru anything related to the 550. Ive been burning this stove this way for over 3 years with no mechanical problems from the heat. The problem comes in when you cant run your blower, such as a power outage. Before i had a generator and we lost electricity, i could only feed a couple logs at a time. Im sure the stove is optimized for a short chimney.
  15. degkop

    degkop New Member

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    How did you create the secondary air control? I have seen some posts on here where people have drilled into the fireplace brick to get to the liner, but I would prefer not to do that.
  16. EJL923

    EJL923 Feeling the Heat

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    The secondaries are the tubes at the top of the stove, and air for them comes in thru a hole at the back, unregulated. I made a slider which slides over the hole. It involves taking the stove out and turning it around.
  17. Brookwood

    Brookwood New Member

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    I need to replace my door gasket. The Jotul Rockland manual page 19 says LD2 and .350, then page 21 says .360.

    What diameter gasket, in fractions, do I need for the door?

    Thanks.
  18. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    LD means low density. 3/8 inch is .375 so I would use 3/8" low density rope gasket were it me.

    Just did some looking. You need 7 1/2 feet of 3/8 inch low density gasket. All any hardware store sells is low density.
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2013
  19. Rudyjr

    Rudyjr Feeling the Heat

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    Brother Bart can you tell me what you prefer to use to cement the gasket in place when you change them? Thanks, Jim
  20. Brookwood

    Brookwood New Member

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    Thanks for the reply. I see a good number of them with graphite. It seems like a good addition but might be a waste. Now to find a sweet deal.
  21. jatoxico

    jatoxico Minister of Fire

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    Did some maintenance on the 550. Popped off the bottom front grill. Vacuumed everything thing out including the fan blades adjusted the upper heat shield that vibrates against the switch housing. Theres some rust in the back right corner but was otherwise clean. Couple questions.
    1) Don't see where to oil the fans are they serviceable?
    2) What do you use to clean the exterior cast iron?
    3) Was looking for air inlets for the dog house air. Can't find them but I would like to try limiting the amount of air into the box to extend the burn anyone do this? Tinfoil over the both sides of the dog house?
  22. EJL923

    EJL923 Feeling the Heat

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    The only thing i think you can oil is the bronze bearing on the end, its under that rubber red cap.
    I clean with wd-40 if it has a little rust, or just a damp microfiber if its dusty
    The air inlet for the doghouse is above the heat shield above the blowers, not easy to get to during normal operation. You can start by placing screws in the holes. size them so they just slide in, about an 1" or so. They wont come out
  23. jatoxico

    jatoxico Minister of Fire

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    Thanks for the reply EJL.
    As far as the holes above the fans I could not see them. Did you bend the heat shielding down to access? I was thinking that by tin foiling both the front and back openings of the dog house I could achieve the same thing. Then I control air as needed during the burn instead of putting screws which is semi-permanent.

    In your opinion would that work or is the system too leaky? In other words will that air just find another was in unless the holes themselves are plugged?
  24. EJL923

    EJL923 Feeling the Heat

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    Yes, this stove loves to breath. In my setup i've found the doghouse to be beneficial when needing to get a stove going. Also, depending on the wood, i had too much coaling which would have burned down with the help of the doghouse air.The screws can be taken out in between burn cycles with heavy gloves and needle nose pliers. The screw need not fit tight. On my stove there are two doghouse holes, one is plugged with a loose fitting screw, not threaded. It basically just blocks the rocket booster effect and most of the air. I would experiment with that until your happy, then make more permanent solutions if you want.

    You can see the inlet at just the right angle, but its best to take out the heat shield to see it.
  25. jatoxico

    jatoxico Minister of Fire

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    Did you find there was a noticable difference with the one hole plugged? I also read about possibly removing material to allow more complete control of the primary air. Any other way to reduce the amount of uncontrolled air?

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