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Large Oak I need help felling - pics inside

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by Ansky, Oct 2, 2013.

  1. Ansky

    Ansky Member

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    So I've got this very large oak tree (100-120 feet tall maybe), and it's branches are hanging over my pool. Acorns are ruining my cover and it's annoying getting all the acorns in the pool. It is leaning away from the pool and deck, but just barely. I'm also concerned about the tree getting hung up on the other tall trees in the area. Is this something I should even attemp myself? I don't want to hire someone...I'd rather deal with the acorns than pay a ton to have it removed.
    That said, I see there's a lot of people in CT on this board. If anyone has experience in this sort of thing, and would be willing to lend a hand, I'd be happy to share all this oak wood with you. :)

    The tree right behind the pool...
    [​IMG]

    Ignore the plywood...that's the frame for my solar heater for the pool...easily removable.
    [​IMG]

    I think it would want to fall between the deck and the tree with the hammock on it...
    [​IMG]

    It's leaning right where the sun is at the moment...
    [​IMG]

    Another angle...
    [​IMG]

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  2. Ansky

    Ansky Member

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    It wants to go right where I'm standing in these 2 pics...
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Too bad it wasn't leaning the other way...I have all this room to work with...
    [​IMG]
  3. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

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    I would get a 4 wheel drive truck, attach a rope high up and pull it down on the grass in the large area. Obviously there are issues to deal with any job of this kind. Make sure it doesn't fall on the truck. (rope needs to be long enough).
  4. Beer Belly

    Beer Belly Minister of Fire

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    I agree....but I would set up a pulley mounted in a solid tree in the direction of where you want to drop the tree, and pull from a safe area
    http://s4.photobucket.com/user/RicksPhotos/media/Firewood/DSCN2335.mp4.html
  5. Craig S.

    Craig S. Member

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    Even still ... this seems too risky to be worthwhile unless you've got someone with you who's done this before. Above all, be safe.
    Beer Belly likes this.
  6. charly

    charly Guest

    I would rope the back weight out of the top or even rope the top out of you can get a climber local.. Ideal thing would be top it out using a speed line to remove the canopy.. Then the branches would all come down away from your pool.. Next I would use a false crotch to hold sections of trunk wood , as you cut them off and lower them to the ground.. Less damage to you lawn... Then with the trunk wood lower maybe you could pull it back into your woods, thus saving damage to your lawn. I guess I look at things different having done tree work in the past for a living.. I always hated leaving a big huge indentation in someones lawn... Do you have under ground water sprinklers? Main thing is to get the back weight off of the top if your pulling with the top on.. Word to the wise, where the tree is,, install 2 pull ropes...As you pull take up slack on the second rope,, this way the tree can't go back if the first rope fails for some reason.. A rope is a lot cheaper then a new pool.
    Here's the false crotch for lowering trunk wood..and Speed line work.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=6EDPAR5n3DE
    http://youtu.be/F8OkghIn9L8
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 2, 2013
  7. Ansky

    Ansky Member

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    You guys are scaring me. And rightfully so. I think taking this tree down myself is a risky task for someone with only a little experience in bringing down trees. I don't have enough know-how to bring the tree down in the grass area. The tree is clearly leaning in the opposite direction. I'm sure I'd take out my pool or shed. Realistically, I think I have 3 options:

    1. Cut it the way it is leaning. It won't fall on my pool. I think it will land directly on my horseshoe pits. That's fine. I'm just worried about it getting hung up on other trees. That would s*ck. If the other trees weren't there, I'd choose this option in a heartbeat.

    2. Call someone and have it taken down.

    3. Keep buying new solar covers and keep removing acorns from my pool. (Leave the tree be).
  8. charly

    charly Guest

    You could pull it, you just want a nice open face cut and good hinge wood so it holds all the way over... another thing to think about,, if you pull it towards the lawn , if the butt tears off the hinge wood, theoretically once the tree hits the ground the limbs could twist the trunk and send the bottom where you cut the tree into the side of your pool.. In those cases we have cut the tree higher and installed a rope to keep the trunk and the stump together, a butt hitch , just so the trunk won't move off to either side and hit something.. better safe then sorry.. Just takes a minute to install the rope.. Or you could even tie the trunk above your cut and tie the other end to another tree to keep it away from your pool side,, once cut.. You just don't want the face cut to close before the tree hits the ground or it will tear the hinge wood loose.. now having a free butt to hit your pool side. Maybe call someone and just see what it would cost... Might be cheaper then you think...Make sure they have insurance.... It's funny when I did my tree work , people asked for a insurance certificate to be sent to them, no problem... My theory, insurance or not, once you do damage and fix the damage, those folks will never call you back or refer you to another friend.. So my thoughts were to do zero damage.. Need to rope something down in two pieces instead of one safely,, do it!
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 2, 2013
  9. Beer Belly

    Beer Belly Minister of Fire

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    Option #2
  10. TreePointer

    TreePointer Minister of Fire

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    Call for estimates. Tell them you do NOT need a "removal." Just get the tree on the ground and grind the stump. You will buck all the wood and take care of the brush yourself. This should get you a much better price.
  11. Ansky

    Ansky Member

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    Yeah, I will. I don't even need the stump ground. It won't bother me.
  12. basod

    basod Minister of Fire

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    I have a much larger oak overhanging my pool - yes the acorns are a pain, they stain my liner and clog the robot.
    As for ruining the cover just add water on top after covering for the winter and leave it slack to the surface.

    If you want the tree down I'd recommend paying someone unless you have good ropes and two buddies to help pull as well as experience in dropping trees.
    A reasonable-high price would be 200-300 to just drop it. Some guys will take these jobs and be done in 30mins - they will hit it when they can't get into other jobs yards due to rain etc.
    Just be as reasonable and accompanying as possible to get the best price - they've dealt with more than enough fussy folks and will charge accordingly.
    TreePointer likes this.
  13. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    if we were there it would not take long to know which is the correct way to take it down. To me it looks super easy but for someone with not much experience, I can see where it could be a problem. As far as the other trees, it is always possible it might take a few small limbs with it as it comes down but is this so bad? What if it hangs up? That can be determined before the tree is even cut.

    That tree is a good sized oak, but not huge. Just don't tackle it if you are not comfortable with it. Also, do not view videos off Youtube and try to follow them or you are liable to get into some trouble. Do not attempt to do something beyond your capabilities. As for felling the tree the opposite way it leans, you can if you prefer and it certainly can be done. With me, it is always a last resort and you'd best know what you are doing before starting.

    With this in mind, why not see what it would cost to have someone drop it? That is all you want done is to get the tree dropped. That should not cost much at all and then you get the fun of bucking up that wonderful firewood. Or, get used to the acorns. The time for acorn drop is really a short time of each year and a long handled broom would clear that pool of the acorns really quick.
  14. Ansky

    Ansky Member

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    I'm not sure about that. They've been falling into the pool for a good portion of the summer. My kids would put on the mask and dive down and see how many acorns they could get from the bottom. Plus if you're walking in the pool and step on one, not only does it hurt, but they also can put a hole in the liner.

    I agree with what you said, though. I'm in no rush. I may wait until the leaves fall off and then get a better look at trees it may fall into. I don't care if other limbs come down, I just don't want it getting hung up. Not with my kids around.
    Maybe even in the winter, when the ground is frozen, I could get someone in there with the heavy equipment and not do too much damage to the lawn.
  15. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    Yes, sometimes during the summer some early ones will drop and I can see the problem with the pool. In a dry summer for sure it would be a problem. Around here we had very few drop until just a couple weeks ago thanks to plenty of moisture through the summer this year. Now the deer, turkeys, squirrels and chipmunks are having a real feast!
    Ansky likes this.
  16. 343amc

    343amc Feeling the Heat

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    I've had a few large trees dropped that were beyond my comfort level or otherwise could cause extensive damage if I did something wrong. Drop only was about 25% of the cost of full removal and cleanup. That little bit of money was worth the peace of mind for me.
    Ansky likes this.
  17. charly

    charly Guest

    I think two ropes, one that can be wrapped around something as to be able to keep taking up slack and yet hold the tree as you go.. The other rope, attach to a come along, and that will pull the tree over.. Just have a wide angle on the face cut so it won't be closed as the tree comes over, leaving the hinge wood in tack... That tree doesn't even need to be climbed to set ropes.. I'd use a throw ball and get the throw ball over a main crotch in the middle of the crown.. then pull your rope up and over the crotch bringing the tail down.. Now tie a half hitch and a bowline just above your cut on the trunk. set a second rope a bit above that one , pulling it through the same crotch or one by it .. Now you have two ropes set, never climbing the tree... So if a tree crew comes they really need not even climb the tree, that's a very quick way to set lines... With a second rope holding , that allows you to release and adjust the come along if you need to , in case you needed to shorten something up to complete the pull.. You have a way out with a second rope.. Winter sounds like a good time to drop the tree.. ground will be frozen..
    Ansky likes this.
  18. gzecc

    gzecc Minister of Fire

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    There is no guarantee the tree will come down in the direction you think its leaning. You should still use a rope in tight places.
  19. Bret Chase

    Bret Chase Minister of Fire

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    I'll admit it's not a 3d image, but I've got to agree with BWS.... this doesn't look remotely hard to me from the pictures...
  20. TreePointer

    TreePointer Minister of Fire

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    Yeah, the pictures seem to show a situation that I'd be comfortable falling with it roped. However, I have been fooled by pictures.
  21. charly

    charly Guest

    Here's the stick method I still use when needed... You can figure where your tree top will wind up.. Any stick works..
    Beer Belly likes this.
  22. Bluerubi

    Bluerubi Member

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  23. charly

    charly Guest

    One tree crew I worked for had a friction bollard, similar to this... just a single bigger bell... rigging is fun and lets you handle large pieces safely.. Makes the job quicker for the climber being able to take larger limb wood, and yet the ground people have total control.. Nice around the pool if you couldn't drop the tree... Notice the ratchet, that can be used to pull a piece up as the climber cuts the limb wood moving it way from maybe a house roof etc. Cool video.. Rigging rocks!

  24. Hills Hoard

    Hills Hoard Minister of Fire

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    thats a decent sized tree...be safe!
  25. northwinds

    northwinds Minister of Fire

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    I'd pay someone to drop it. You just never know. There could be diseased parts of the tree or carpenter ant damage. It's possible to screw up your cuts. Too many things that could go wrong. There will be plenty of work to do once it's on the ground.

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