1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Learning about Fireplaces and Inserts

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by mereanarchy, Dec 5, 2012.

  1. mereanarchy

    mereanarchy New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2012
    Messages:
    4
    Hey guys (and gals?). I am Cathy, live in Virginia, just purchased my second home ever. First home didn't have a fireplace, but this one has a great fireplace in the family room. The house is oil heat ($$$$$) so I am looking at getting some additional warmth from a fireplace insert. As seems typical from what I have read on here, I am like most women, and don't want a stove :) That being said, here are some specifics... Fireplace opening is 42 long, 28 high, and 20 deep. The current metal liner is 14 inches in diameter, I believe. Damper is one of those at the top of the chimney with a chain.

    Question I have, I am leaning towards getting the Osburn 2200 insert. Can I just leave my current liner as/is, or do I need to do something to be able to use the insert? Ex BF says that I can just stick it in my fireplace and away i go, but something doesnt sound right about that? Purpose of the insert is secondary heat for just that room and the "sunroom" next to it, and up into the kitchen/foyer area. I still want to be able to sit in that room when the insert is going, rather than get chased out because it is too hot.

    Thanks for your help in advance!

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. mereanarchy

    mereanarchy New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2012
    Messages:
    4
    I have pictures :)
    First picture is standing in the foyer looking towards the room that has the fireplace in it. The really dark room to the right.
    Second picture is self explanatory :)
    Third picture is standing in an addition they did (I think its supposed to be like a sunroom without enough windows?) looking thru the family room back to the foyer.
    CL7848664_3_0.jpg Senseny House 004.jpg Senseny House 002.jpg
  3. DAKSY

    DAKSY Patriot Guard Rider Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2008
    Messages:
    5,379
    Loc:
    Averill Park, NY, on Burden Lake II...
    EDIT: I posted a reply BEFORE seeing the pix. Definitely looks to be a Site-Built Fire Place. You probably won't need to insulate the entire length, but you'll need a block off plate at the bottom of the liner & insulation at the top.
  4. mereanarchy

    mereanarchy New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2012
    Messages:
    4
    fireplace is definitely site-built. the sellers took the wood burning stove with them when they left, and relined it and installed the top damper because of a contract prior to mine. that contract fell thru, so I got the leftovers. the new liner for the chimney was apparently not a normal size because the chimney flue was so big (I am talking about something I know nothing about, if it doesnt make sense its probably because I got it wrong).

    The chimney is ~25 feet tall? its a single story over there, but that room has 10 ft ceilings.
    here is a pic of the exterior if it helps. Can I put a liner inside a liner?
    Senseny House 031.jpg
  5. DAKSY

    DAKSY Patriot Guard Rider Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2008
    Messages:
    5,379
    Loc:
    Averill Park, NY, on Burden Lake II...

    Yep. No problem doing that. Can you post a pic of what that liner looks like where it enters the fire place?
  6. mereanarchy

    mereanarchy New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2012
    Messages:
    4
    you mean the fireplace looking up into the chimney? Don't have a pic of that, can take one tonight though...
  7. KaptJaq

    KaptJaq Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2011
    Messages:
    703
    Loc:
    Long Island, NY
    Welcome to the forum...

    All modern inserts/stoves need a flue size that matches the unit to burn properly. Since it is an exterior chimney I would consider an insulated liner of the correct size for the insert you decide on. Add a block-off plate at the bottom and the cap that comes with the kit and you will be good to go. Since your current flue is so large it should be a fairly easy DIY install.

    Looks like a good size fireplace so go with a large insert so you can have easy overnight burns and extra heat when you need it. As has been said here many times it is easier to build a small fire in a large stove than to get extra heat out of a small stove.

    Best of luck with the new home & stove.

    KaptJaq
  8. chimneylinerjames

    chimneylinerjames Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2012
    Messages:
    381
    Yep this looks pretty simple. You would need a liner the same size as the stove, most new stoves are 6". Insulate the chimney liner the entire length. That size of fireplace will leave you with plenty of options to choose from for an insert.

    This is a job that a DIY-er could do easily. Just make sure you follow all the manufacturers directions and you will be set. Save lots of money doing it yourself than hiring a chimney sweep.
  9. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2009
    Messages:
    4,164
    Loc:
    Central PA
    With an existing 14 inch liner it will be easy to install a 6 inch (typical) or 8 inch (required by a few stove models) liner. That is a pretty large room with the chimney, so I wouldn't worry much about the room overheating. I'd get a large insert or stove so you can make a big dent in the heating needs of the house if you want to. If you are just an occasional woodburner, then most of the time you'll be starting with a cool room or burning on a particularly cold night, both of which call for a big stove. Go big is my recommendation. If you get too much heat you can use a fan blowing into the stove room to move heat around the house.

Share This Page