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Liner install question

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by BikeMedic2709, Oct 6, 2006.

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  1. BikeMedic2709

    BikeMedic2709 New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2006
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    Loc:
    North-Central Ohio
    I am considering a liner install, and I am planning on doing the job myself. What I am lining is an exterior chimney that is 25 feet in height. 9X13 clay tile lined. (Masonry chimney.) All brick hearth, floor to ceiling. 8 inch thimble.
    Here is my problem. This chimney was specifically built for a freestanding wood stove and has an 8 inch thimble direct into the clay tile. When I drop the liner in, how would I connect the flue/smoke pipe from the stove? Will I have to break out bricks in the hearth to access the liner? Or, is there something/some other way of doing this? ( Do I sound stupid yet?)

    Oh, by the way! A big THANK YOU to all the great people here! Even though I have been burning for quite some time, I have learned so much here! This site and all the people here ROCK! I had my annual inspection and I asked the chumney service for a quote on a liner. When I asked for specifics on the type of install and work intailed he explained that he would have to "bust out" my exising tile to place the SS liner. I would have gone along with this had I not read the posts concerning this! Thank you in advance for all you help.

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  2. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    OK, if I read this right you have an eight inch thimble running through the wall to the clay chimney liner tiles. Just like mine in the basement.

    Liner kits come with two piece tees. You remove the snout from the tee and attach the tee body to the liner. Then you lower the liner down to the thimble and attach the snout to the tee working through the thimble. It ain't easy for sure. Especially if you have a thimble that is two feet long like mine. When we couldn't get the darn tee past a mortar joint in the tiles going down I took the darn thing off and just pulled the liner into the thimble and went without a tee. I could do that because I was using a 5.5 inch liner instead of a six and got the idea from Forum member Todd.

    If you have a shorter thimble that you can reach through more readily than mine then attaching the tee snout won't be fun, but can be done.

    Hope this makes some sense. The two piece tee is the key to what you want to do. Every chimney with a thimble works the same.
  3. BikeMedic2709

    BikeMedic2709 New Member

    Joined:
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    Loc:
    North-Central Ohio
    And again. Thanks BB! This helps alot. I've read your previous posts on your liner. Did you get yours from the ebay dealer in MI?
  4. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    The one for the basement I got from an eBay dealer in PA. The same one that screwed David up with the two piece jobbie. I had a great experience with them. I guess since mine was a standard size that they ship in one piece.

    The double wall one for the Sierra insert I got from a different eBay dealer. I wouldn't recommend the guy. But I bought it the first week he was selling on eBay last spring and got a thirty foot double wall liner shipped in here in two days for $280 including shipping. Pretty soon after that he figured it out and raised his prices. The tee for the double wall insert liner (didn't need a tee for the insert, bought a Homesaver cast iron adapter locally) and a left over piece of the liner are what I used in the installation in the basement that was in the picture.

    Kinda slick to just pop the cap on that tee on the stovepipe and check the lower pipe.
  5. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Here is another solution cut in a cleanout door on the outside opposite the thimble opening.
    It will give you working room to make the tee connecction and give you the ideal setup for cleaning both
    upward and to the thimble. Also a good way to monitor what is going on in the chimney.

    This is the same suggestion I gave BB along with a few others
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