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Load of Wood

Post in 'The Inglenook' started by scfa99, Jan 7, 2008.

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  1. scfa99

    scfa99 New Member

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    Forgive me for I have sinned. After several years of scrounging I broke down and bought firewood. I found a tree service in NJ that sold me this full grappling truck load of (3 are oak, 1 hickory, 1 maple, rest ash) for 325. Seems like a good deal. He said should be 6 + cords.

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  2. ansehnlich1

    ansehnlich1 Minister of Fire

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    now there's a nice pile of firewood for sure. i'm about to do the same round here, buy me a pile of log length like that. nothin wrong with buyin it, sheesh, 325 bucks, think if you bought 200 gallon of oil at about 3.25 a gallon, and that'd only last a couple months right?
  3. jpl1nh

    jpl1nh Minister of Fire

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    Plus you'd miss the fun of cutting and splitting it. I'm serious, (notice I didn't mention stacking it?)
  4. titan

    titan Minister of Fire

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    I'm with ya.....I can cut and split all day and it's more fun than work.As for stacking.....I'd sooner get a punch in the mouth.
  5. They Call Me Pete

    They Call Me Pete Member

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    Why stack it. Leave it in a humped up pile with better circulation than a tight stack pile. The less I touch it the better off. Although some don't have the room to have a big unsightly pile taking up room in their yard.
  6. sixminus1

    sixminus1 Member

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    SCFA, where in NJ are you? I'm looking for a load like that, but all the folks in the shore area only seem to have "seasoned" pre-split wood, at around $180/cord.
  7. Cazimere

    Cazimere Member

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    It's probably just me, (my sight ain't what it used to be) but I'm having a hard time seeing 6 cords there.
    How long are those logs ?
  8. scfa99

    scfa99 New Member

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    I'm up in Hunterdon county, Clinton area. The tree service is about 45 mins north in upper Warren County. You down by the shore? Be a long haul for him. Let me know if you want his name.

    Matt
  9. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Here is a way of figuring it......roughly.

    take the larger logs (4) which all seem to be close in size. Figure the cubic size of them....

    (guess here)
    20 inchs by 20 feet

    Volume of that: about 40 cubic feet.
    80 cubic feet is one cord (a cord is 128 cf, but not solid, so 80-85 is the amount of solid wood).

    Maybe they are longer and wider than than - if you want, give us the dia and length of those big babies and we will calc it, or do it yourself here:

    http://www.online-calculators.co.uk/volumetric/cylindervolume.php
  10. scfa99

    scfa99 New Member

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    Alright you guys made me go out into the cold to measure. all are 16' long. 3 are 25" diameter, 1 is 22", 1 is 20", 3 are 18", 1 is 15, 2 are 12.
  11. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

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    Well, the 4 biggest ones together are about 210 cubic feet. - or 2.5 cords
    The 3 18's are about a cord all together
    and the other ones at about 1/2 a cord

    total about 4 cords. Still not a bad price these days.
  12. scfa99

    scfa99 New Member

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    Thanks Craig, its funny when i saw it piled up I thought that looks more like 4 cords rather than six but figured what the heck do I know. While its a bit of a downer that its not the stated amount I am pleased that I was able to purchase next years supply for 300 bucks AND it can all be cut to the length I want and its premium hardwoods not mixed with low BTU wood. I guess his boom truck is not as large as some of the other tree services as they all seem to say it will measure out to 6 - 7 cords.
  13. sixminus1

    sixminus1 Member

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    Yeah, I'm in Northern Ocean county. Doesn't seem like it would make much sense to try to call the same folks, given the distance. On the flip side, my neighbor keeps bringing home 6-8ft lengths of oak, locust, and cherry. He has the truck, I have the chainsaw and log splitter, so we share everything. So far it's a good arrangement. If we can keep it up, we'll both have enough for next season. Until then, it'll probably be more the of same old lies from firewood guys delivering green wood that's only been sitting for 2 mos. But, from what I'm reading here, everyone's first year is rough :)
  14. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Nice looking wood. I'd say no more than 4 full cords & probably closer to three when all is said and done.

    Watch for metal in the butt logs. Quite often trees removed by tree services contain some metal, especially if they were yard trees.
  15. Gene K.

    Gene K. New Member

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    I look at stacking as a breather from splitting. By the time that the wheelbarrow is full, I roll it to the stack pile. After it's all stacked, I go back start splitting.

    Say, is that a picture of a pet dumbo rat?
  16. woodburn

    woodburn Member

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    I've never heard of metal being in the trees after a tree service takes them down. What do you mean by that?
  17. Chardler

    Chardler New Member

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    If the tree came from someones yard, especially the back yard, it's possible that at one point long ago someone nailed something to the tree, wrapped wore around it, or put clothesline hardware on it and then the tree grew over it, but you get to discover it in 2008 with your chainsaw, 20 years later. Ever build a tree house in your backyard? My brothers and i probably left ten pond of nails in my parents oak trees over the years!
    If the trees came from the woods or forest, there's less of a chance of someone nailing or screwing metal in them as they have been isolated since they were saplings.
    In other parts of the country, bullets are regularly found as well, but we don't have that problem too much here on Long Isaland.
  18. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    ^^^^ Beat me to it!

    All I was trying to say is that trees growing near buildings almost always contain things like nails, barbed wire, ceramic insulators, spikes, lag bolts, etc., and that tree services usually work in populated areas, so their wood is more likely to contain metal. If you buy a load of logs from a logger, chances are it came from deep in the woods somewhere and is probably clean. That's not to say that some pretty strange stuff isn't found (the hard way) in forest-grown trees, either. From shotguns to axes to lag bolts from deer stands, etc.--it can get pretty interesting. Most sawmills have a collection of hardware that has mangled their saws over the years. One mill I visited once hit a maple syrup tap--in an oak log. Another one cut through a horseshoe--twice. Time to get a new saw, and probably a new sawyer.
  19. Chardler

    Chardler New Member

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    I'm slated to get a large delivery of wood tomorrow morning from a tree service company that's subcontracting for LIPA. He says we'll get a bout 50 yds of hardwood in tree length form, pretty much like the first post here. It's free and he says if I want more, let the trucker know and he'll bring by another truck load. He's got a grappler and he'll drive it into the backyard and unload it. From there I'll cut it up and split it. It's free and I don't have to go get it.
    If it works out OK, I'll give you his number and maybe you can take some if you have the room for it and the means to process it. He needs more people like myself to drop it off at the end of every day, that's what he says at least. We'll see tomorrow! Maybe I'll try and post a pic.
  20. My_3_Girls

    My_3_Girls Member

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    My family has an old smaller mill - worst thing we ever hit was buried inside of an old Oak tree that was lining a street or town common somewhere in western MA. It seems that as the older trees die, they rot out in the middle, and to stop the tree from rotting anymore, they fill it with concrete!!! Quite a shock on Pop's (or was it Gramp's) face when the 52" circular got into that!!! Changed the teeth after that one.
  21. struggle

    struggle Minister of Fire

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    I was cutting into a large cottonwood tree bucking it and hit something at least a foot into the tree and trashed the chain. I kept cuttign around said item as chain was shot at his point and it was a big a$$ nail that was put there at least 50 years ago. .

    It is just the risk we take. I have hit multiple nails over the last few years but never one so deep into a tree as that one was.
  22. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    I know the feeling. I needed wood pretty badly one year so I went to cut some at a construction site five miles from here. The logs were all neatly piled about ten feet high. I picked a free one a few feet up the side of the pile. One cut through it and I found the large chuck of concrete it was laying on. Completely hidden under the logs. The chain was five minutes old and had to go in the trash.
  23. jpl1nh

    jpl1nh Minister of Fire

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    mostly nails, sometimes barbed wire. Trees are wood and people pound all sorts of things into them in their yards
  24. Bill

    Bill Minister of Fire

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    My cabin was partial farm land at one time, and the farmer left old sleighs, and broken farm equipment lay in the woods. Well the trees grow right up around the steel. I could retrieve some of these items but would have to cut down the trees. So you can find all kinds of hazards in any wood, might be why I need an electric chain sharpener.
  25. DiscoInferno

    DiscoInferno Minister of Fire

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    I once sawed into a cache of landscape rock in the base of a yard maple. Grinder rescued the chain.

    On our MI property there is sandstone everywhere which is well camouflaged on the sandy ground. I've cut many a sandstone groove bucking on the ground there. I don't seem to learn.
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