1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

LP gas traps

Post in 'It's a Gas!' started by vgrund, Dec 17, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. vgrund

    vgrund Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2005
    Messages:
    377
    Loc:
    Amherst, NH
    As noted previously I'm refitting an inefficient LP gas log setup with an efficient, heater rated LP insert in my least used fireplace. I have plans to install a wood burning insert in my "main" fireplace later (way too expensive to do it all at once). I hope this makes me worthy for submitting the following question to The Hearth Room. :)

    I have a large LP tank buried in my yard. It feeds a plumbing system that distributes the gas for cooking, heating, clothes drying, etc. So, other than the occasional delivery (and higher price per BTU), it is just like being connected to a natural gas utility.

    At my local stove shop yesterday, a guy mentioned that I should have traps at each point of use to catch any water / sediment / etc. His point was that these LP contaminants, especially water, would quickly ruin the burner in my insert. I never thought about that before, but when I got home I checked the basement. Sure enough, I have traps at each point of use. I'm attaching a picture of the trap for the branch that feeds my fireplace.

    The guy at the stove shop suggested these traps need cleaning out periodically, which makes sense. I'm just wondering, how often is enough? Anybody have a clue?

    Victor

    Attached Files:

    • trap.JPG
      trap.JPG
      File size:
      141.3 KB
      Views:
      469

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2006
    Messages:
    3,629
    Loc:
    Northern Colorado Mountains
    glad you put those in there!!!

    LP and moisture will trash the best burner in no time. You dont have to check them that often, at first i would check them with each tank fill. If you have excess water in your propane, get a drying agent for it. Buy some extra thermocouples now, they will not last as long in a lp unit dry or not. For somereason (at least colorado propane) propane has alot of corrosive non combustable stuff in it.

    Leave your pilot light on 24/7 365 days a year, it will keet the firebox dry, keeps bugs out, and prolong the life thermocouple.
  3. vgrund

    vgrund Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2005
    Messages:
    377
    Loc:
    Amherst, NH
    MountainStoveGuy,

    Thanks for your comments, and I appreciate the insight.

    I didn't install the traps, they came with the house. They must be code here. As for checking them with each tank fill, I simply can't imagine doing that. We heat our whole house with propane, that would mean checking every 5-8 weeks in the winter months.

    In any event it seems I'll have to learn some basic gas plumbing because there is no way I'm paying a plumber to check these periodically ($$$$).

    Victor
  4. vgrund

    vgrund Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2005
    Messages:
    377
    Loc:
    Amherst, NH
    MountainStoveGuy,

    Could you elaborate on the drying agent thing? I've never heard of this.

    Thanks.
  5. GVA

    GVA Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    2,140
    Loc:
    Waxhaw, NC... Formerly North shore Mass
    They are code everywhere at least for NG I would assume the same goes for propane. NG I check them every year just some sediment no moisture, not much call down here for LP although it is available.

    I should add that if you disconnect those flex lines it is recommended that they get replaced. Just a heads up.
  6. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2006
    Messages:
    3,629
    Loc:
    Northern Colorado Mountains
    I thought this was a DIY project, so i assumed that he put them in. Its common to forget those :)
    A drying agent is housed in a device that is inline with the house and the propane tank. The propane passes through it and it wicks out the moisture. There only installed for propane that has excess moisture. Call your LP supplier and see what the moisture content is.. its normally not needed.
    I only suggest checking the traps on the first few fills, then you will know how much your getting and how often you will need to clean them out.
  7. vgrund

    vgrund Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2005
    Messages:
    377
    Loc:
    Amherst, NH
    I am only the second owner of my 7 year old house. Experience with the prior owners makes me quite confident that the traps have never been checked or cleaned.

    This thread is a real eye opener for me. I never knew my LP plumbing needed such regular routine maintenance. When I bought the house in Dec 2004, the state required that a GASCheck guy inspect the entire LP system. Never once did he say a word about inspecting/cleaning the traps. My LP supplier never said a word either.

    Victor
  8. GVA

    GVA Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    2,140
    Loc:
    Waxhaw, NC... Formerly North shore Mass
    It's alright not many people check they're drip-leg (trap) The length is 2" minimum and even though I check mine every year It may never fill up with sediment Just a good idea to check once in a while. If you check yours and see nothing in there than Maybe every 2 years or so check it, Moisture that's a different story but MSG mentioned checking with your supplier...
    Residential is more susceptible than industrial since sediment has to only travel upwards a minimum amount say 8 feet max. Where as at work my heaters are mounted 20' up and the max gas PSI is about 2psi.. it's hard for the sediment to move that high...
  9. DAKSY

    DAKSY Patriot Guard Rider Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2008
    Messages:
    4,954
    Loc:
    Averill Park, NY, on Burden Lake II...
    Little recommendation here...Looking at the pic of your drip-leg, I don't see a shut-off.
    There should be one BEFORE each drip-leg (i.e. BETWEEN the drip-leg & the tank), so you can shut off the gas flow to check for sediment.
    That way you can do each one at your leisure without losing too much LP into the air.
    Otherwise, you'll hafta shut down the main at the tank & you will lose most of what is in the line before you get the damn cap off the nipple.
    Just my $.02 FWIW...
  10. vgrund

    vgrund Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2005
    Messages:
    377
    Loc:
    Amherst, NH
    Wow... You resurrected an old thread I'd forgotten. However, your point is solid and well taken.

    My house is basically propane everything, and unfortunately the plumber did not implement your best practice. I suspect my case is the common one.

    Victor
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page