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Maul shape

Post in 'The Gear' started by wg_bent, Mar 29, 2006.

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  1. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    I'm considering an 8 lb maul to add to the arsenal (a small arsenal consisting of only a 6 lb maul) and I noticed a distinct difference in the shape of mauls at the local garden center from that of my 6 pounder. My 6lb has starts thin almost like an axe, then after about an inch tapers quickly to being much wider. The 8 pounders I saw has essentially a blade that was ground into a much wider cross section and tapered uniformly back. Not sure tha describes it well, but the 8 lb was a much more blunt looking thing. Sometimes I find that my 6 lb can sink into wood if the wood is wet. Lately, it has been getting stuck in some wet pine, and I wonder if the more blunt tool would be better (regardless of weight).

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  2. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Blunt is better, Warren. You got it right about the narrow ones sticking.

    A blunt 8-pounder is an awesome wood-splitting tool. There's a world of difference & you won't be disappointed.
  3. wg_bent

    wg_bent Minister of Fire

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    thanks, wood or fiberglass handle? I'm constantly duct taping the wood.
  4. Sandor

    Sandor Minister of Fire

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    Fiberglass!!!!

    Will save your body from the vibes, and it will survive a sloppy hack.

    Also, when splitting pine, instead of hitting dead center, try whacking it in the center, but only half of the maul hitting the wood and the other half out of the wood, toward you. Works MUCH better.... and I have split at least 2 cords of pine this past year. The maul wont get stuck either.
  5. babalu87

    babalu87 New Member

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    Truth
    Though some of that 30+ inch diameter Red Oak has taken up to 20 shots to bust it open, then its smooth sailing.

    I cant believe how much wood that tree has given up
    Once its all stacked I am guessing near 2 cord
  6. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    As I believe we've discussed in other threads, hitting the same spot repeatedly is the most important part of splitting. Two hard parallel whacks don't have the same positive effect as those same whacks in the same spot. It's not always possible to do, but it's something to shoot for. Of course, you've got to be hitting the right spot, too. You can flail away all day at an impossible-to-split spot on the end of the chunk and get nothing but worn out. I always look the block over and try to figure out where it will split easiest. Usually (though not always) it's a spot where there are no knots. Once you split part of a block away, it loses some of its integrity and finishing it off becomes that much easier.

    Personally, I prefer wooden handles. That's partly because for some reason the fiber glass ones don't hold up for me and partly because I don't wear gloves, and my hands won't slide along the length of the plastic handle when I'm splitting like they do with a wooden handle. What I do is epoxy the handle in when I mount a new one. I go through about one wooden handle in a season, which is to say every 20 cords or so.
  7. babalu87

    babalu87 New Member

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    I concur on hitting one spot repeatedly, works great......... IF the wood is willing.
    The pieces I have had issues with always have and old branch knot buried in the middle somewhere that wasnt showing its true colors on the outside.
    If I manage to hit it in the "sweet spot" 2-5 wacks is all it has taken for that big stuff. The only time I am wearing gloves is when I am putting the wood in the truck, the wife has had to pull the splinter out of the Lions paw enough so that I learned my lesson. I'm sticking with wood on the new maul too.
    Damn that evil Maple too, I cut down ONE Maple tree and I have poison ivy on my forearm!

    My neighbor doesnt think the big Oak had a cord in it ............ LMAO I told him he better come look at the pile.
    I am keeping the wood from this tree in a separate pile and there is over a cord and I'm not done with it yet.
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