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Napoleon 1900... I think I'm ready!

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by vtburner, Nov 13, 2009.

  1. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    lol....I think the dog may have ate it...thanks for the compliments.....we do a lot of water in that pot, to help with the dryness in the winter....but I also sometimes finish off maple syrup on it too....I plan on modifying the top sheild so I can get that pot to sit directly on the stovetop, that cooking trivet isnt all what it's cracked up to be.....gonna use a plasma cutter to make a nice size hole in the sheild to accept the pot, and making a custom trivet to put in it when the pot is not in use....someday!

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  2. Rickochet

    Rickochet Member

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    In the Boonies of NE, Indiana
    Last week I ordered a new secondary air manifold gasket and new baffles from Obediah's in Montana. Both have been upgraded to new improved styles. The manifold no longer requires a gasket. It came with new stainless steel bolts and much to my surprise, my existing bolts were easily removed! The redesigned baffles are completely different. Instead of four 3/4" thick baffles, there is only two of them that are 2" thick and they now run north-south in the firebox. To install them, the top layer of firebrick must be removed. After getting the baffles in place, reinstall the firebricks using the top Z strip again and pull the baffle down and it provides a firm pressure on the bricks so they stay in place. Make sure you push the baffles to the rear of the stove allowing the gases exit at the front of the stove. (Similar to the old baffle positioning.)

    As far as my air control quandary: after the above improvements were made, the stove seems to be back to its normal mode of operation. It is 30 degrees outside right now and 74 in the house!!!! Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh....... it feels so good!!!!!

    Enjoy your 1900's and keep the dialog going to help others out with any issues they may have! Happy Burning!!!!
  3. Rickochet

    Rickochet Member

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    Thanks for pondering the issue Heats Twice! Since you made the simple capacitor analogy, it became clear!!!! :)
  4. HeatsTwice

    HeatsTwice Minister of Fire

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    How have things worked out? Has your problem been solved?
  5. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    I just got a set of the new baffles too, and I like them much better....haven't been able to install them, will wait for a mild day to let the fire go out......
  6. Rickochet

    Rickochet Member

    Joined:
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    Loc:
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    I replaced the baffles, manifold and door gasket and things were very close to normal. However, I still wasn't satisfied that it operated as it did when new. I removed the door glass to get a good look at the glass gasket and I determined the gasket was not sealing very tightly on the vertical sides of the glass. After a quick trip to our local stove shop to get a glass gasket, I cleaned the glass and replaced the self adhering gasket, fired up the stove and NOW it is just like it was when new!

    Just a good reminder to check out every possible component when something is not operating normally. I am sitting in my recliner watching the secondary burn flames slowly lick in such a beautiful fashion! Life is goooooood!!!!!
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 31, 2013
  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Yea! Congratulations. Enjoy the warmth.
  8. HeatsTwice

    HeatsTwice Minister of Fire

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    Scotty, I know this is a little off topic but I was admiring your stove installation and wondered how you obtained such a nice curve when installing the wood floors. I am currently installing them throughout my house and, if challenged with the same type of curve, I would not know how to transfer it to the wood boards and then make the cut.

    So how did you transfer the curve and what tool did you use to make the cut. I have some ideas but yours looks so nice I would like to know how a professional does it.
  9. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Let me get some pics and a description lined up and I will post later tonight if I get a chance....it really wasn't that hard, trust me....this was my first real hardwood floor install and it went very smooth, considering I installed it in my 100yr. old house, and there was a lot of prep work.....I will post some pics later....
  10. Rickochet

    Rickochet Member

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    Since I replaced my baffles with the 2" thick updated models, my stove "pops & creaks". It always has made a little noise going through the typical heating cycle, but now it constantly is in a state of "creak". Have you noticed similar noises in yours since changing the baffles?
  11. Rickochet

    Rickochet Member

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    The popping & creaking finally went away. It must have just taken some time for the baffles to settle in to a "comfortable" position. The Stove is beginning the 5th heating season. I am still very satisfied with this stove.
  12. jeffs

    jeffs Member

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    I know this is an old thread, but wanted to add something I experienced as there is a lot of great info here on the 1900, and thought it might be helpful to someone.

    When we first got our 1900 I had frequent issues with not being able to control the fire. I called the dealer (local guys who were clueless), put in a flue damper, and finally found info here pointing me to Obadia's who gave me info on altering the draft regulator to close completely. That helped a lot. But later I realized I had missed the simplest explanation. I noticed that my coals was burning brighter around the ash door, and realized i was getting an air leak there. Eventually I learned to never clean the ashes out completely, but leave about an inch in the bottom as insulation. I also started pushing more ashes/burned chunks into the opening for the ash door and really packing them in there to seal that air leak. That helped, but stupid me, I never checked that the ash door was really closed 100%. If you use the ash door, it only takes a tiny bit of debris to keep it from closing completely. I mean, it can LOOK closed at a quick glance, but if you don't check it carefully, it may not be. I know this may sound like a "duh" thing, but when you're new to this, you don't know what you don't know. I don't even use the ash door now, I just shovel the stuff out the front, it isn't a big deal, and have no issues with over-firing now.

    I would like to know if anyone has done more comparisons between using the replacement baffles (which are now up to around $90 a pair), vs. firebricks as HeatsTwice was suggesting.
  13. mepellet

    mepellet Minister of Fire

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    Curious how you altered the draft regulator to close completely. And do you mean close the primary and secondary openings completely?
  14. jeffs

    jeffs Member

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    If you contact Woody at Obadiah's (mentioned in this thread by several people), he will email you the instructions on the fix. It's pretty simple. If I remember correctly, I had to take take out the ash drawer and take off a couple of bolts to access the draft reg. mechanism on bottom of stove. (the one with the handle under the ash shelf.) That handle, connects via a rod to a small steel plate that slides in a track and covers an air opening. You're sliding that plate open more or less to adjust the air going in. On newer 1900s, a small spot weld bump was added that prevents the plate from closing completely, so there is always some air going in, you can never close it completely. Word is, this was done to help the stove meet EPA regs. People who closed the draft down too far, too fast would cause excessive smoking/smoldering (higher carbon output). The extra air prevents that. Anyway– you can basically remove the rod/plate piece and grind that bump down so the plate closes almost completely. Took me about 30 minutes total. The thing that is also an issue with this (I think), is that the way it's set up now, to always allow that extra air in, it really pushes the stove towards over-firing if you're not careful. And, if you ever have a chimney fire, you can't close the draft off (also not a good scenario).

    I believe this draft control is the only opening that allows air into the primary and secondary opening, but I'm not sure. Maybe someone else can shed light on that?
  15. jbean

    jbean New Member

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    We have the Napoleon 1400Pl and we love it. It does a very good job of heating our main floor living. We wish it had a blower though (our model didn't come with one), so we have a fan that we set up and it seems to really help move the air around.
  16. mepellet

    mepellet Minister of Fire

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    Thanks jeffs. The fix probably doesn't apply to my stove then. I can push in the draft handle pretty far. I don't think I could push it in any further because the handle would hit the ash lip.
  17. jeffs

    jeffs Member

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    I could push mine in pretty far too, but after the fix I could actually push it in to where you could barely see the end of the spring sticking out under the ash lip.
    If your stove is working fine, I wouldn't worry about it.
    Woody at Obadiah's did say it will increase you burn time. If you can close it down further, you'll get longer times between loading.
  18. mepellet

    mepellet Minister of Fire

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    Interesting. Might have to investigate more. I can see the entire spring/handle. I just always thought it was bottoming out on the spring/handle
  19. rsplodge

    rsplodge New Member

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    I haven't read the entire thread here but have just ordered a Napoleon 1900 for our 1200 sq ft cottage up here in Canada. We get very cold winters and our previous stove just couldn't get the place warm enough. I will probably still be fighting our very high ceilings and this huge 12 x 16' double-glazed garage door which is sort of the architectural highlight of our cottage (and definitely needs insulating blinds or something), but I'm curious to see how much better this stove will perform than our old Pioneer.

    One question I have is whether a blower will do a much better job than the heat-powered ECOFans? We have one of those but I suspect the electric blower moves quite a bit more air(?) I don't like adding a powered unit, if I don't have to, as our cottage runs off of solar, a bank of batteries and an inverter. I wonder how many ECOFans equals an electric blower?

    Thanks, ..Roger
  20. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Your nemesis will be the high ceilings. Heat will want to stratify up there. The stove blower will help somewhat, but I think you are going to need to have a fan running in reverse in order to stir the air near the ceiling and force it's return to the floor level.
  21. rsplodge

    rsplodge New Member

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    Yes I'll definitely look into getting a ceiling fan and use some of my solar power to run that.

  22. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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  23. rsplodge

    rsplodge New Member

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    Wow those are super efficient! Thanks for the link.

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