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Need help setting up wood stove insert as freestanding.

Post in 'Classic Wood Stove Forums (prior to approx. 1993)' started by FireJoe, Feb 7, 2012.

  1. FireJoe

    FireJoe New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2012
    Messages:
    4
    Loc:
    Montana
    First let me preface my post with the fact that I know very little about wood stoves in general. My wife and I moved to a country home 2 years ago that uses a freestanding wood stove as the main source of heat, and we love it. It has been, however, my first experience with a wood stove, so it has been a learn-as-you-go experience.


    Currently I am trying to set up an older wood stove in my shop. The previous owner had a stove in there that he took with him when he sold the property, so there is already a chimney insert in the roof (not sure what this is actually called, but there is a 6" pipe surrounded by a metal box that passes through the roof). My dad gave me an old stove they used to use in a shop. It's simply a square metal box with no legs, which I believe is an insert type stove designed to go into an open fireplace. I'm trying to figure out how to use this as a freestanding stove in my shop, but I've run into a few problems.


    The biggest problem I have is that the opening on the top of the stove is rectangular rather than round, measuring 9.5" x 5". I have tried a few of our local wood stove and farm supply stores, and nobody has a clear idea of how to hook it up to a 6" stove pipe. One shop owner told me to have a custom adapter made at a sheet metal shop. The fellow at the sheet metal shop recommended I try to use a larger stove pipe and, using a hammer, attempt to shape one end of it to fit the stove top, as a custom made piece would probably cost over $100. That sounds a little sketchy to me, but only because I have no experience setting up a wood stove and the last thing I want is to burn my shop down.


    I would like to save as much money as possible on this project (obviously using a hand-me-down stove and the old chimney fitting, I'm looking for a very low cost setup); however, I'd rather spend a little money on something if that's what it takes to ensure safe operation of my stove.


    A few other details that may or may not help: I plan to set the stove on some cinder blocks to lift it off the shop floor. It's a small shop so I don't do any automotive/tractor maintenance or anything, but I do store oil and chainsaw gas and whatnot in there so I don't think I want it sitting on the concrete floor in case of spills. Also, the only identification of the stove I can find are the words "The Yellowstone Stove" on a gold colored circle on the front of the stove where the air control is. The stove shop owner recommended I look into the brand of the stove to see if they made an adapter, but google searches for "The Yellowstone Stove" haven't been fruitful, and nobody I've talked to has any idea if any sort of adapter even exists.


    I'm sure something like this must have been done before. Does anybody have any advice for me? Also, any suggestions about my general setup or tips or anything are appreciated, as noted earlier I am a wood stove noob. :) Thanks in advance!



    Joe

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  2. FireJoe

    FireJoe New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2012
    Messages:
    4
    Loc:
    Montana
    Well after reading some other threads it sounds like the best solution is to buy an adapter or have one made. I found a link to this adapter

    http://www.chimneylinerdepot.com/st...ainless-Steel-Insert-Boot-for-Flex-Liner.html

    somewhere along the way, and although it's much bigger than what I need I think I can bolt it to the top and seal it with furnace cement. However, as the piece costs $85 bucks before shipping, I'll probably check back with my local sheet metal shop and have one made if the price is comparable.

    Still open to any suggestions anyone might have. Thanks

    Joe
  3. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    South Puget Sound, WA
  4. DAKSY

    DAKSY Patriot Guard Rider Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2008
    Messages:
    5,064
    Loc:
    Averill Park, NY, on Burden Lake II...
    That adapter should work & maybe your local tin-knocker
    can reasonably duplicate one for less than $85. Note that
    you may need another adapter to get your connector pipe
    affixed...
    DON'T even think about storing flammables in your shop.
    It's NOT the danger of spills you have to worry about, it's
    the potential EXPLOSION of the fumes when exposed to open
    flame!

    That is the MAIN reason for many local ordinances that prohibit
    the installation of solid fuel burning appliance in workshops...
  5. FireJoe

    FireJoe New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2012
    Messages:
    4
    Loc:
    Montana
    Hm that's a good point that I hadn't considered. Easy enough to put my gas cans in another of the outbuildings, we have several.

    What other kind of adapter will I need to hook the stove to the stovepipe if I have the piece that I linked in my last post? Is it something the sheet metal guy can take into account if I have a piece custom made? I'm only looking into that route because I haven't been able to find anything like what I need locally, and although I didn't check I suspect the shipping on something like that would be $10+, and if I'm going to be spending a hundred bucks to get it going I'd just as soon support the local enonomy.

    Thanks for the tips, much appreciated!

    Joe
  6. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    12,310
    Loc:
    Western Mass.
    Make certain that the part that goes through the roof and the pipe up there is NOT stove pipe, but rather chimney...double or triple wall of a known brand name. It surely should be, but please make sure. It's always possible the former owner used the wrong stuff.

    Since you are not familiar, my suggestion is to call a chimney sweep or other pro to inspect it.
  7. FireJoe

    FireJoe New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2012
    Messages:
    4
    Loc:
    Montana
    Thanks, I'm pretty sure just looking at it that it is double walled, but I will have someone double check. I believe our insurance guy has to come out and look things over quick so that there aren't any liability issues and he's fairly knowledgeable about this kind of stuff. More good stuff, though, thanks for the input!

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