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New small insert install... a plan and some questions

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by lostandconfused, Apr 23, 2013.

  1. lostandconfused

    lostandconfused New Member

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    Thanks again folks. The house is only 1600 sq.ft. total, and we expect our main source of heat will continue to be our oil furnace - we're not going to be a 24h burn operation.

    The Progress looks like a nice unit - I'd discounted it due to height, but taking a closer look just now lead me to discount it due to cost! $3000 vs. $2000 for the Regency insert.

    Our hearth is 24" deep. I'd rather avoid an extension (cost again), unless there's a trade off somewhere else.

    Probably should have mentioned budget earlier - around $5k, but that includes all chimney work and installation (estimated $3k for that)

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  2. lostandconfused

    lostandconfused New Member

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    This could be a good option. I'd assumed it would be bigger than the 350 which was too high.

    Do you know what they retail for?
    ----------
    Edit: about $2800 seems like, but more in Canada I'm sure.
  3. bodhran

    bodhran Member

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    Newfoundland Canada
    I use a Regency I1200 in my home and find it gives off plenty of heat. It's all I use for heat actually 1100 sq. ft. bungalow. Had to have the old liner removed from the chimney first. I would definitely go with the recommended installation and use the 6 inch liner.
  4. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Best to ask your dealer on that one. Local prices can vary depending on dealer stock and how motivated they are to sell.
  5. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

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    Wait to see what the Woodstock Union will cost (rumored to be budget friendly), it is not released yet but might be a better fit for you if it has the same short leg kit as the progress.
  6. lostandconfused

    lostandconfused New Member

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    Loc:
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    Some progress to report... went with the Regency in the end. Considered the Jotul c350, but decided against due to high cost and surround style (negative WAF). The Regency was the only model that would sit flush with the fireplace, and not require any hearth extension work... decision made!

    We tiled the existing hearth using 12x24 porcelain (looks a bit like slate, textured finish). We got an electrician in to install a new outlet for the blower (currently white, will replace with a black outlet when I have one!).

    The chimney was fully re-pointed, had a new cap installed and a rigid 5" liner added (non-insulated). I discussed going insulated with the installer and he didn't recommend it. Based on the height of our chimney (25ft+) both he and the dealer said we would have enough draft for the small insert firebox. Our existing clay tile liner remains in place.

    We're really pleased with how it looks from the front! One issue is that there is a 1" gap between the surround and fireplace brick (see photo). I called the installer back and he's going to come take a look and see how to snug it up. Anyone else have this problem with an install?

    Back on wood, I've ordered a cord ($240), and that should be arriving in the next week or so... bring on the winter!

    Thanks to all the folks above for their input - it was a definite help!

    Attached Files:

  7. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Congratulations. Moving the insert back an inch should be easy unless it is hitting the back of the fireplace. My suggestion would be to order 2 more cords of wood. Ideally you want to be 1-2 seasons ahead.
  8. Sprinter

    Sprinter Minister of Fire

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    Hey, that looks good! Glad you got it figured out. Sounds like you may have to change your member name...

    I don't know how much space you have for wood, but get as much stored now as possible for the following year. It can take a long time for wood to properly cure down to the optimum 20% moisture content and that is the number one culprit for poor performance and dissatisfaction. I would advise that you get a moisture meter and see where you stand with the new wood when you get it. We can help you with getting the wood to it's best.
  9. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

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    Congrats on the insert.

    $240 for a cord in the summer, man I wish I could get that around here.
  10. webby3650

    webby3650 Master of Fire

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    $150 a cord anytime of the year around here.:cool:
    Unless there is a brick sticking out, it should just slid right back. I find it hard to believe the installer would have left it out an inch for no reason. Thats a nice heater. Enjoy!
  11. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    Diffrent situation gain different results, but I would say most on here that had to downside liner diameter have no issues.
    webby3650 likes this.
  12. Sprinter

    Sprinter Minister of Fire

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    At 25', that's a pretty long chimney. I imagine that the manufactures have to cover their backsides and spec for worst cases, such as warm climates and 12' lengths.
  13. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    There is a better chance than not, that the wood your having delivered, ain't going to be ready in 5 or 6 months.
  14. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

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    With this being NS he might be getting softwoods, which if stacked in a sunny windy spot might be useable in December. I would suggest asking the wood supplier if he had anything left over from last year he could give you.
  15. lostandconfused

    lostandconfused New Member

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    No softwood (it's available, but is cheaper) - should be a birch/maple mix. It seems like this is my best available option as properly seasoned firewood doesn't seem to be readily available around here. Suppliers I called didn't have any from last year. I'll stack most outside, but some inside in a heated space which might help it dry out quicker?

    This echoes what both the installer and dealer said! Also that's a good call on the moisture meter... any particular models to recommend?
  16. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

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    Stacked in a garage with a dehumidifier running would help as long as your electricity rates are low.

    Harbor Freight sells a cheap MM that works good, had mine for a couple years.
  17. daveswoodhauler

    daveswoodhauler Minister of Fire

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    Does the surround have to attach to a specific point on the unit, or is it somehat flexible.
    I guess the reason I ask is that if you could, I would probably just try to push the surround back and leave the stove in place. (I am guessing you cant if its similar to mine, but my thoughts are if you can it might be a good option to allow a little more heat in the room as long as you have enough clearance in the front of the unit to combustibles)
    I'm guessing this isn't an option, but figured I would throw it out there....good luck.
  18. Sprinter

    Sprinter Minister of Fire

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  19. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    Bring the wood in after winter has set in, and most of the insects are done for the winter. One year when I was laid up after a hernia op, I bought 5 of the largest tote tubs I could find at Kmart or Walmart, one of those stores, and set them in the living room and filled em with splits. The dried real nice in the same room as the insert is in. At 5 or 6 months, Birch & Maple may be burnable, but ain't going to be dry as it should be. Drying indoors in the stove room will help considerably. Be warned, you may or may not get a few stray insects.
    Never used a moisture meter, in time, you will know if it is dry or not merely by lifting and feeling the weight of the splits.
  20. lostandconfused

    lostandconfused New Member

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    Behold. Fuel.

    No idea if this is good stuff or not... but came from a recommended source.

    Attached Files:

  21. mellow

    mellow Resident Stove Connoisseur

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    Looks like it was just split. That will need to be stacked in a windy sunny spot in hopes you can get some moisture out of it.
  22. lostandconfused

    lostandconfused New Member

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    You're both correct... it smells like fresh cut wood, and the splits are really heavy. I'll be stacking in various locations so will see how things progress over the next few months in terms of drying out.
  23. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Stack it so that the prevailing wind can blow through the stacks. Maybe see if you can get some more wood that is actually seasoned too. Note that before accepting a load of wood you should test a few random splits for wetness. It they are fresh split, damp, or overlength, refuse the load.
  24. coldkiwi

    coldkiwi Member

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    The install looks great with that slate look ceramic tile,everything pulls together just fine .Did the installer put a block off plate in the chimney if he did not,with that gap you ate going to lose heat up the stack.
  25. lostandconfused

    lostandconfused New Member

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    To be fair to the supplier, they don't advertise it as seasoned/dry/ready-to-burn wood so I was expecting it to require drying out. The only people in this area who advertise fully seasoned wood on Kijiji/Craigslist seem a little sketchy (cash only, not a registered firewood business etc), which makes me doubt that what they're selling is as advertised.

    Thanks! There's no block off plate, but the Regency came with insulation that sits behind the surround that should (in theory) limit heat loss.

    We still haven't figured out if we can push the unit back in. According to the dimensions of the fireplace, there should be plenty of room, but I can't shift the unit on my own. Now awaiting a visit from the installer to see what's up.

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