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Opinions on raised hearth.

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by Havendalefarm, Mar 30, 2013.

  1. Havendalefarm

    Havendalefarm Member

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    I had mentioned in a previous post that we are going to build a new hearth when we install our PH. I am thinking of raising the hearth about eight inches as it allows a smaller footprint on the non loading sides of the stove. I double checked what we want to do with Woodstock and they confirmed I could do this. You just can't deduct the vertical rise from the loading side. This will also make it easier to load the stove. I don't see a downside to this as it will make the hearth stick out into the room less . Since I see many of you have raised hearths; is there any downside that I may be overlooking? Also to do this will involve offsetting the stove four inches from the flue being directly over the center of the stove. I thought a clean and nonrestrictive way to do this would be by adding an adjustable 90 to the single wall pipe and adjusting it so it kind of makes an s toward the flue. Is this the correct way? it doesn't seem like the pipe could come out of the stove at a diagonal, it wouldn't fit right.

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  2. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    I think a raised hearth is a really good idea.

    As one gets older, one is more susceptible to injury - back, knee, hip, elbow - any of which can make stooping to load a stove a difficult proposition. An elevated hearth allows the placement of a seat near the loading door, if necessary or advisable.

    It is also rather nice to have the window and fireview close to your seating/visual level when you rae gathered round the stove.

    My ICC pipe goes back 4 inches toward the wall before going through the ceiling support box. Two 45's with a curving section, which is probably the same thing as an "adjustable 90"? Anyway, mine works fine and does not diminish the draft. I'd put the bend as far above the stove as possible, to give yourself the longest possible straight run before it.
  3. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

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    Depending on how high it is and where the hearth is located it may be a tripping hazard. That's the only downside I can think of.

    MAtt
  4. ddddddden

    ddddddden Minister of Fire

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    Central Va
    +1

    20" hearth came with the house.
    L-o-v-e it!:)
    As long as you're building, why stop at 8"?
    Think about how far you do/don't want to have to bend over when you're loading a 10-lb piece of wood into the stove, repeatedly. . .ditto for doing any maintenance, although not as frequent as loading.
  5. fox9988

    fox9988 Minister of Fire

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    NW Arkansas
    I have a 12" high hearth, wish I would have went 16"+. I have a good view of the glowing cat and rolling secondaries from my recliner, but more is better.
  6. Havendalefarm

    Havendalefarm Member

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    New Haven ,NY
    Hadn't really thought of going higher than I needed to. The door loading help makes good sense. Less single wall the better too. We mocked up the 8" raise with cardboard will try it higher and see how the wife likes it. Anything that makes it more attractive for someone else to load the stove once in a while is OK with me. Will make removing ash pan easier also.
  7. wingsfan

    wingsfan Feeling the Heat

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    Jackson,Mi.
    We like our raised hearth..Makes it easier to see inside the stove when reloading.I am glad we went with a raised hearth, At just 10 inches high, I couldn't imagine having to get any lower when loading. Our is ooffset about 6inches on one side to make more room for the kindling bucket and what not. IMG_20121006_183906.jpg 1354479168124.jpg
    Billybonfire likes this.
  8. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    wingsfan-that looks real nice.
  9. rideau

    rideau Minister of Fire

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    The length of double wall stove pipe you'd need isn't very great. Personally, I'd upgrade to double wall when installing the new stove.
  10. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

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    HF, built mine 12" high, and like fox, wish I would have gone 16".
    Would have given a bit better view, and easier loading.
    I pull a chair up in front of the stove and clean, shovel ash, load, from that chair. Bad knees made this pretty much a no-brainer for me.>>
    I kneeled (sp) in front of the stove for 4 years before getting around to building a raised hearth.
    Dimension may need adjustment depending on whether you're doing the short or long legged version too.
    Change one thing, and it usually involves changing something else..........:cool:
  11. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    No reason to go to double wall, single wall is all I would ever use if you stick to the guide lines for length of stove pipe.
  12. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

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    My wife and I disagreed at first on the height. We both wanted raised and I wanted 12" maximum but wife wanted 16". In the end, we did go with that 16" and I am very happy we did. That height is perfect for sitting on a chair to load the stove or clean ashes. We built the hearth large enough so we can put wood on it when bringing it into the house. Then we sit and load. Actually, we built the hearth oversized and during the winter months we usually find boots and gloves by the stove which is really nice.

    Like oldspark, we went single wall. We went straight through the wall then up. The horizontal section has a bit over 1/2" raise per foot which exceeds code. No problems with this at all.
  13. madison

    madison Minister of Fire

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    check for clearance from stovetop to ceiling ?
  14. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

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    Hello

    I have built two raised hearths. I luv them! They both have an overhang for rope light install and also I can get close for cleaning without the old Toe Jams!

    I put an Electric 220 Volt 900 Watt kickSpace heater with wall thermostat in my raised hearth. So I could keep my feet warm when the stove was down for cleaning! Then I made an overhang with a recessed 1/2" inch slot and installed rope light!! It cost me $600 with the tiled back and mantle! I wonder how much if I paid someone else!!! LOL See pics below!
    P.S. Also made it to hold 9 - 12" x 12" tiles so no tile cutting LOL

    Second one
    http://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/...in-nice-day-for-raised-hearth-building.76358/

    Attached Files:

  15. madison

    madison Minister of Fire

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    "Beam me up Scotty!"
  16. Nimrod1911

    Nimrod1911 New Member

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    We built a raised hearth. Right now, a big steel stove is on it but my PH is on its way. My wife insisted on the raised hearth so she could sit on it. Ours is about 10-11 inches I think. Getting stoves up and down from it requires some work but my wife and I were able to put my 550 pound stove up there by ourselves (with the help of a car jack, a hand truck and some boards). I think a raised hearth is the way to go. I suspect my wife and I could get the 700 lb PH stove on to the hearth as well......but I'm going to hire two men and a small boy just in case.
  17. bboulier

    bboulier Feeling the Heat

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    I don't have a raised hearth, but wish I did. Sometimes I have to get pretty low to peek-in while loading or starting the fire. And, as been said, one would have a better view of the rolling secondaries with a hearth.
  18. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

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    Hello Again

    I just built my 3rd raised water proof hearth for the garage. Nice to have it warm to work on stuff in there!

    The hearth has pressure treated 2x6s trimmed out with PVC board with the ruff side showing.
    Then plywood, cement board and porcelain tile on top. Took time to build but really protects the stove from having all kinds of stuff too close to it!

    Also put 4 red patio blocks under each corner to keep the hearth out of the puddle that always pools there!

    Then I installed the Selkirk DT up & out kit and the garage is nice and cozy!

    Attached Files:

  19. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Do it. My raised hearth is a blessing both for loading with my crapped out knees and ankles and also re-burn stoves throw a ton of heat down and out from the glass. The more distance to the floor in front of it the better.
  20. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

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    Any pics BB?
  21. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Just an ugly red brick raised hearth fireplace. Everytime I see you guys nice looking hearths here I go and throw another empty beer can at mine.
  22. Don2222

    Don2222 Minister of Fire

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    Red raised brick is not ugly. I could not afford a brick layer when I built my raised fireplace hearth. We had to settle for some granite remnants that we were lucky to find. They also cut them and polished them to fit.

    Attached Files:

  23. teutonicking

    teutonicking Feeling the Heat

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    I like mine very much. I usually sit on the right hand side of the hearth while I'm loading it. My beloved stove.jpg
  24. Havendalefarm

    Havendalefarm Member

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    New Haven ,NY
    We decided to build a twelve inch raised hearth, tiled with black marble. And also wrap the chimney with same tile. Wife thinks it will contrast the Blue PH nicely. Stove will be delivered week of 27th and the way the weather feels we will get to run it some this spring yet. Looks like it will be warm enough Monday or Tuesday to let the Dutchwest go out so we can move it and build the new hearth.
  25. A1Stoves.com

    A1Stoves.com Minister of Fire

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    I dislike adjustable 90*s, just had too many fall apart over the years.
    fixed 45's look nicer too, but you are stuck with the offset they give you. for DuraBlack 2 45's gives you 4.5" offset
    2 45's in DVL gives a 5" offset

    and i agree w/above posters, a raised hearth is very nice

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