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Overload Springs

Post in 'The Gear' started by brownie, Apr 9, 2007.

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  1. brownie

    brownie New Member

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    HI TO ALL

    I bought a new silverado, and was wondering if I was to put overload springs on it will it void my warrenty.
    Or what about air shocks. I have had overloads on every truck I have owned but this is the first new one.

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  2. TruePatriot

    TruePatriot New Member

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    brownie,

    Having worked for a few car companies, I'm quite confident that if the overload springs are not an option, specific to your model, then unfortunately, yes, it would probably void your warranty. Sometimes, mods will void only a portion of a warranty (for example, a adding a big subwoofer to your stereo will not void the warranty on your tailgate latch--just on your stereo and possibly the entire electrical system), but in this case, I could see them denying warranty on the drivetrain, among other things. They could say "but if you hadn't carried the extra load made possible by your (aftermarket) overload springs, your transmission would not have failed." You know how they are.....

    I would have to believe non-factory-optional airshocks would be treated the same as I've just described, re: nonfactory overload springs.

    If overloads are a factory option, however, but you plan to install the factory parts yourself, I'd still be careful get it in writing that self-installation would not void the warranty. Of course, the dealer makes money if they do the install, so they're not so likely to write something like that for you.

    Let us know....
  3. titan

    titan Minister of Fire

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    If either option would void your warranty,I'd go with the air shocks;they oughta provide better damping and rebound rates but the cost may override any benefits.Then again, its only money....
  4. struggle

    struggle Minister of Fire

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    One word "TIMBRENS" the only way to go.

    They will level you off and not affect ride when empty. Easy to install.
  5. loneeagle15

    loneeagle15 New Member

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    anyone looking to put air shocks on their truck should think twice about it if you hit the back roads looking for wood I had a pair on and kicked up a piece of gravel it hit the hose and nicked it 30 miles from home full load of wood and no shocks go with the over load shocks
  6. JustWood

    JustWood Minister of Fire

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    I'll second that. I've had air shocks ,OL springs and Timbren load boosters and the Timbrens are by far the way to go.
  7. backpack09

    backpack09 Minister of Fire

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    You all are very funny.... If I am forking over the $$ for a new truck. I am keeping that damned thing under warranty any way possible. Why give the dealer an excuse not to honor the warranty. If you are hauling possibly overloaded on stock suspension, they don't have much of an argument. If you are hauling overloaded with nonstock parts, and something breaks... well then you were obviously operating outside of you warranty and not going to get far with the stealarship.

    Wait the 3 years till your warranty is up, and the repairs are on you anywase. Then upgrade anyway you would like.

    I currently run 1 ton coil helper springs in the back of my jeep with new Bilstein shocks. They ride like crap unloaded, but nice and smooth loaded or towing.
  8. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    I'll third that. I've had timbrens on my half ton Chevy pickup for years now and they have always performed perfectly. THe timbrens are cheap, easy to install (and remove should you develop a warranty issue), have no moving parts, no hoses or bladders to fail, and just bloody work as advertized.

    They seriously install in 15 minutes using simple hand tools.

    Look at your options here.... you will load the truck with whatever you want and the rear end will sag onto the OEM bumpstops and be low in the rear and your warranty will be intact. You load the same load into your timbren equipped truck and your pickup only slightly settles in the rear which keeps all the driveline angles and slip joints in the right place. The timbrens make it less apparent when you have maxed out the suspension of the pickup but they do not allow you to overload the truck anymore than the OEM bumpstops.
  9. mikeyny

    mikeyny Feeling the Heat

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    overload springs are added to trucks to stabilize the truck when maneuvering and turning on uneven road surfaces, not actually to increase the load capacity of a truck. The truck axle is rated at a certain load range. You can add all the springs you want and not get a truck to haul a heavier load safely. (we all do it though). Buy a heavy duty truck to haul heavy stuff.
  10. mayhem

    mayhem Minister of Fire

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    Buy a heavier duty truck...if you find yourself adding overloads to every truck you buy and feel they are a necessity, you need to start buying trucks that are heavy enough to do what you want them to do.
  11. Highbeam

    Highbeam Minister of Fire

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    I disagree with the buy a bigger truck theory. The automakers have been mushing up suspension in the name of driver comfort for years now. The typical half ton pickup is not used for hauling so the springs have been made extra squishy. To carry the legal load in the bed would sink the rear end significantly leading to misaimed headlights, upset steering geometry, wallowing in corners with the squishy shocks, and porpoising as the truck goes over bumps. Adding overload type springs that are only in effect while loaded will maintain the squishy ride while empty but provide stability and firmness while legally loaded.

    Quite often the guy that owns a big HD truck thinks everyone else needs to have one too. There is a time when a larger truck is needed but that time must be based on when you actually exceed rated loads.
  12. mayhem

    mayhem Minister of Fire

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    I can certainly see that point of view. I would ask the original poster why he thinks overload springs are necessary. Is it becuse he wants to carry frequent very heavy loads that push the recommended GVWR or for another reason?

    Half ton trucks and 3/4 ton trucks are very different animals these days. It goes way beyond a simple suspension calibration to make a 3/4 ton truck from a ahlf ton. For starters, most if not all half tons on the market today use C frame rails (that is a length of steel with 3 sides of a box, the cross section looks like a letter C), while 3/4 and up use fully boxed frames for added strength. Just looking at empty trucks side by side, the 3/4's typically have an extra 500-750 lb of steel in them. They're designed to hold heavier loads and to tow more than half tons from one end to the other, its more than just a set of springs.

    That said, I stand by the suggestion to buy heavier trucks under the assumption that he's putting helper springs on there in order to carry heavier loads...if thats not the reason behind the help springs then my suggestion is not valid.
  13. FLASHMAN

    FLASHMAN New Member

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    Bingo... I have Timbrens front and rear on my GMC 1500 (I plow), and you can't go wrong, they work great and they're wicked ease to install...
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