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Permitting in CT

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by DonCT, Mar 20, 2006.

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  1. DonCT

    DonCT Minister of Fire

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    Well, I put down my deposit on a Hearthstone Heritage. Now I just need to prep the area where it will be installed. This will be my first time getting a building permit, so is there anything I can do to make sure the process is as quick and painless as possible?

    I'm planning on an install exactly like MountainStoveGuy and live in Bristol, CT.

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  2. Corie

    Corie Minister of Fire

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    Bristol eh?

    I've got some good friends in bristol and I've been there a few times. Unfortunately, I don't know any of the building inspectors.
  3. FireGlow1

    FireGlow1 New Member

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    The building department is there for you. Drop by andask for a permit application and then ask what else you will need to submit. Ask how long the process takes and how much will it cost. I recommmend that the cost of the improvement be equal to the price of the stove only, why inflate it.

    Good luck

    John Meeker Jr
  4. DonCT

    DonCT Minister of Fire

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    LOL @ Dylan. If I had that kind of cash, I wouldn't need the wood stove ;)
  5. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Don
    #1 Copy your manual or down load a copy and copy the installation intructions.
    #2 If using a liner the manufactures specs should be coppied and submitted
    #3 Again specs of any heat shield or reduced clearance enclosure and hearth extentions or pads
    If building them materials used R or u factor to meet or exceed the stove requirements
    Also building them dementions need to be labled sides front loading door and rear to combustiables
    #4 if using an existing masonry flue size length condition and last cleanning report.

    The more prepared you appear the easier things seen to go. Try to set a time to talk with the inspector to see
    if he requires more info Also bring your sales contract to identify items purchased for the install.
    Good luck Pm me if you neeed some assistance
  6. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    Don, did you get a chance to look at the open framing photos that i posted on my install thread?
  7. DonCT

    DonCT Minister of Fire

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    Yes, I did. They'll help out alot. I have to frame the top of the alcove in steel, so I can get the 24" clearance from the top of the stove.

    Elk, thanks for the good checklist. I've got the manual from Mr. Mountain. The stove store is doing the install of the chimney system aswell, so would I get the info for the permit from them?
  8. Michael6268

    Michael6268 Feeling the Heat

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    I have first hand knowlege of the Bristol inspectors. If you only have to have a mechanical inspection you will be ok. Only one Mechanical inspector and he is thorough, but fair and friendly. If you are doing any remodeling/framing- good luck! You have a 50/50 shot of getting the a real piece of work! Good luck!
  9. stuart

    stuart New Member

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    i was told only the fire marshall will be here is that true i also live in CT
  10. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Each town has the option of assigning the mechanical/ building inspector or the fire dept to inspect wood stoves. Building codes cover wood stoves and so does NFPA 211 which is part of the fire code either way the building inspector /Mechanical or Fire marshal
    Part of the permitting process it to provide as much info as possible it then becomes public record. This is very valuable when someone buya home withan existing wood stove. They can call my office and I can supply the manufacturer Quadra-fire model of stove and Home saver full length HT 2100 liner. I cannot do this unless I gather the info. How many post have you seen, can you identify this stove. If installed and permitted in my town, I have all the necessary paper work for you and your insurance companies
    Your bill of sale should fully itemize the installed components or the work contract. I would not pay or sign one till I understood what work is to be preformed and what materials were included in the install. I would recomend final payment after the install passed inspections. I also recomend the installer obtain the permit after all he should know the materials involved . If he owns the permit chances are he gets paid after the inspection or he does not have to surrender the compliance papers. If anybody has followed the post here it pays to know what is involved. I have actually done inspections,where the owners were sold a full length line. My inspection found it direct connected, no liner after the first 5'
  11. DonCT

    DonCT Minister of Fire

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    That's what I planned to try and work out. My final payment to the dealer will be contingent on the installation passing inspection. Also, I'm going to call them tomorrow and see if they can get the permit. I've got all the drawings/pictures of what I'm building, so they can give that to the town.

    Has anyone else dealt with Deans Stove and Spa on their stove install? Did they get the permit, or did you have to secure it yourself.

    On a side note, I've started to rip out my old ZC fireplace. What a mess!!!! It's fun destroying stuff for a change :) I'm taking pictures to document my progress and will post them in the Picture Forums when everything is complete.
  12. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Where you are doing work that requires non combustiables and clearance issues, It should be your permit. It is not fair the work off a permit that an installer might obtain. Then have it fail because you or someone else did not correctly build,say a proper stove pad or hearth extention. See what I mean. you may PM me if you need assistance filling out your permit or building a compliant pad or suround. again good luck And No I did not vote for GW ( saw your debates in the Ash Can)
  13. DonCT

    DonCT Minister of Fire

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    Fair enough. I think I have all the materials I need for the permitt anyways. I'm trying to following the manufactures clearances to the letter, I just hope the pad meets code. I'm building it out of 2x6, with plywood and ceramic tile for the top of the pad. Is there something else I can use under the tile besides plywood? Should I use durarock?

    Btw, I didn't vote for GW either ;)
  14. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson Mod Emeritus

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    Depends on the tile and how it's installed.
  15. saichele

    saichele Minister of Fire

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    I'm not sure if this is aof any help or not, but sometimes I've found going in and seeming prepared to be less helpful. They seem to perceive it as a threat to their authority. BEING PREPARED, however, is helpful.

    If you can actually talk to the guy doing the inspections, ask questions and pay attention. If he says something that deviates from the manual, do friendly "Well, it's good I talked to you, maybe I misunderstood this thing..." and figure out why what he wants disagrees with what the manual says.

    It's about knowing the rules of the game before you play. The inspector has a set of rules that should closely overlap with the manual, but in the end doing it to the inspectors spec is a lot faster and probably cheaper than doing it to the manual spec. All you need out of this is a safe install and the signed permit. I think after watching this forum for a while, you'd have trouble doing anything truly unsafe. So it's really mostly about getting the permit, largely as a CYA with your insurance company.

    Steve
  16. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    The inspectors use the manuals that come with the stove to inspect by. If you leave your install open where he can see it, have the r values for the materials used for the hearth, and follow all the clearances per the manual you wont have a problem. For example, a protected surface, (a non combustable on top of a combustable with a 1" air space will give you a 1/3 reduction in clearace to a rear wall per NFPA211.) Now not all manufactues allow protected wall clearances per the manual. Only there clearance with a heat sheild. The manual will have a chart. i.e. Clearance with double wall pipe and heat shield, Clearance with single wall pipe and heat shield, Clearance with singlewall pipe and no heatshied, and protected wall clearance. If there isnt a protected wall clearance you cant use the NFPA211 rule. The manufacture trumps standard codes. So dont hide any installation issues, and have it by the book and they dont realy have any thing to fail.
  17. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Don I sent you a PM with the info you requested No cad on this Mac
  18. saichele

    saichele Minister of Fire

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    That's how it's supposed to work. My suggestions were mostly aimed at avoiding the situation where the manual says one thing, the inspector doesn't agree, and you spend significant amounts of time back and forth with the building department to get it resolved. Being technically correct isn't necessarily the whole ball game.

    Steve
  19. rudysmallfry

    rudysmallfry Feeling the Heat

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    Are you just planning on using plywood and a layer of tile for the pad? If so, it's nowhere near enough. I also have the Heritage. It requires a full 1" of non combustibles for the pad. The manual shows several types of non-combusible material and their thicknesses. I thiink durock came in at .2, so you'd need a stack of 5 sheets between the stove and the plywood. Tile only has a value of 1/4". I started the same way, a plywood base and planned to tile the top. I ended up ditching it and pouring a concrete form for the base to get it off the floor level, and then mortared a bunch of sheets of durock together and tiled it.

    As far as permits, I just brought the manual with me along with drawings of my location and distances. Since I was also installing a chimney, I had to also get a permit from planning and zoning for the exterior change. The only person who came out to take a look was the building inspector. He was here a total of 2 minutes. I think the permit is more for your insurance company than anyone.
  20. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    Agreed, but the inspector can disagree untill he is blue in the face, the manual is the bible. There is no absolutes in this industry, but if you have a inspector thats giving you a hard time, and is not following what the manual states, you can always go to the building department and request his boss to look at the situation. If you are in a black and white area there usually isnt a problem, its when you get into those grey's that it becomes a problem.
  21. DonCT

    DonCT Minister of Fire

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    Yea, I noticed the hearth pad requirements. Basically, I need the R value equal to 1.2. What would be the easiest way to get that? Should I use plasterboard or some other type of wallboard? Are there special tiles for heartpads?
  22. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    In that manual, there is a chart of materials and there r values. I dont remember them off the top of my head, but you will proably need to incorporate some air space to get the r value needed. If i remember right, 1/2 micore, 1/8 inch air space, and the tile of your choice should get you there.
  23. DonCT

    DonCT Minister of Fire

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    how to you get the airspace? Do you blow up a balloon under the tile?
  24. MountainStoveGuy

    MountainStoveGuy New Member

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    Metal shims. You can buy strips of 1/8 inch thick, in alot of different length's
  25. DonCT

    DonCT Minister of Fire

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    gotcha!!! Is that what you did for your pad?

    Anyone have a design for a good raisd hearth pad?
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