1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

Sealing stove pipe

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by propguy, Oct 4, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. propguy

    propguy New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Messages:
    47
    My 1st post........... What a great site!!

    I have a new VC Defiant. I sealed the pipe joints with furnace cement about a week ago weeeeelllllll after a couple of break in fires the cement is falling off :gulp: Please Help! Thanks in advance

    PG

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    29,069
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    If you sealed inside the joints when you put them together and secured them with sheet metal screws they will be fine. The stuff on the outside will flake off from the expansion and contraction of the pipe. Furnace cement is brittle stuff and not flexible at all.

    And it is not a substitute for putting the screws in the pipe.
  3. propguy

    propguy New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Messages:
    47
    Thanks BB, I did use screws but i also sealed from the outide :( There is nothing that I can apply to the joints from the outside??................ maybe I will just leave them. I was trying to maximize my draft and minimize any smoke.
  4. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    29,069
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    Check for leaks when it is burning but if you locked it in in three places around the pipe is is probably gonna be fine.

    That crimp inside expands with the heat too.
  5. propguy

    propguy New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Messages:
    47
    Thanks BB, I still feel the need to seal them. I may take the pipe apart and seal from the inside if I can't find anything. PG
  6. Corie

    Corie Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    2,430
    Loc:
    Halifax, VA
    Really, you'll never see anything leak from the joints, unless you have a really really bad drafting chimney.
  7. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    The inportant thing it to fully push in the joints to the rib edge you should see no corregations of the ribbing
  8. propguy

    propguy New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Messages:
    47
    Hi Corie, The chimney drafts ok but I do have 2 turns in the pipe one is a 90 and the other not quite. I just want to maximize the draft. Maybe I am going about it the wrong way. I need to wait on some cooler weather and dryer wood which is on the way as of today, to make sure I do have enough draft. The cooler weather will arrive today as will the seasoned wood, I have wood but its not seasoned enough for the new stove.

    I have seen post here about dust in the pipe joints etc. and I just want to make darn sure I am drafting as well as it can. PG
  9. propguy

    propguy New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Messages:
    47
    No other suggestions????????? pg
  10. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    29,069
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    Well, yeah. Now that you mention it.

    I suggest you don't try to fix a draft problem that you don't know you have yet. Light'er up and see how it goes. Leak check the pipe. Pass a match or any other flame or some smoke making object, I use a Marlboro, around the seams while the stove is up to temp and you will know real quick if you have a leak. It will draw the flame/smoke into the joint.

    If you don't find leaks in the pipe and you have a draft problem, it is somewhere else in the equation.
  11. Robbie

    Robbie Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2006
    Messages:
    610
    Loc:
    East Tennessee- Great Smoky Mountains.
    What if you have a slight pull towards some joints, but your stove draws very good and works great ?

    As I mentioned somewhere in another thread, my stove is drawing so well it whistles (really) through the hole opposite of pipe damper control knob. :cheese:

    And no, it can't whistle dixie........yet :)


    Robbie
  12. propguy

    propguy New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Messages:
    47
    You do have a point. I really don't know yet, but I did have some problems with the first few fires but the #%# wood was NOT seasoned so to get it to light off good was a fiasco! I will check the draft after my seasoned wood gets here.......................... I still have not heard back from him he is a new wood guy to me hmmmmm he was supossed to call today aaaaah crap pg
  13. Robbie

    Robbie Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2006
    Messages:
    610
    Loc:
    East Tennessee- Great Smoky Mountains.
    Propguy, you won't believe the difference in good dry wood. I burned wet last year and paid for it with lots of creosote and lots of head aches.

    I made a fire the other night, using dry kindling and dry wood, and it went off like it had kerosene in it. What a pleasure to not choke your fire down and have to listen to a sizzling fire for over an hour after you add wood.

    My pipes are not sealed, and I have some "slight" gaps where screws are tight, (you really don't notice unless you look closely) but it does not cause any problems at all.


    I think you'll be fine once you get your dry wood going.


    Robbie
  14. propguy

    propguy New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Messages:
    47
    [quote author="Robbie" date="1160027356"]Propguy, you won't believe the difference in good dry wood. I burned wet last year and paid for it with lots of creosote and lots of head aches.

    I made a fire the other night, using dry kindling and dry wood, and it went off like it had kerosene in it. What a pleasure to not choke your fire down and have to listen to a sizzling fire for over an hour after you add wood.

    My pipes are not sealed, and I have some "slight" gaps where screws are tight, (you really don't notice unless you look closely) but it does not cause any problems at all.


    I think you'll be fine once you get your dry wood going.





    WOW............ thanks Robbie, Man I have had to leave the unlatched door open to create enough air to get it going and have to watch the FOAM come out of the ends PG
  15. Robbie

    Robbie Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2006
    Messages:
    610
    Loc:
    East Tennessee- Great Smoky Mountains.
    That is a shame, I did the same except I swear I had water dripping out of my wood so bad that the ashes settled down in the bottom like wet sand over night.

    And you have to be careful about what "some" say is "seasoned". The people I got my wood from last year said their wood was seasoned because they cut the trees down and let them lay in the woods whole for about 4 months and then cut, split and delivered to me.

    The split pieces were very heavy and they sizzled with water. So your wood needs to be spit and stacked in the sun or close for about 6 months..........you will see a major difference.

    One last note, leaving your door open is a very common thing to do until you get a good draw going. I think everyone on these forums must do this, even my stove manual says to do it.

    Robbie
  16. propguy

    propguy New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Messages:
    47
    Yea We used to leave the door open on our Vigilant also. But the new Defiant is so tight it almost snuffs it out sometimes depending on the chunk of wood. BUT it has not been that cold yet so I havnet been able to let er rip yet LOL I will say that big glass in there "sure dont stay clean long" ugh pg
  17. Robbie

    Robbie Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2006
    Messages:
    610
    Loc:
    East Tennessee- Great Smoky Mountains.
    These newer stoves seem to do real good at keeping the glass clean with the air wash system most have now..........and a good hot fire helps keep it clean too.

    The only time mine got dirty last year was when a log would fall against the glass when I was not watching, it would smoke it up.


    Robbie
  18. Todd

    Todd Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    9,226
    Loc:
    Lake Wissota
    I think I was the guy that said I had dust between the pipe joints. This year I went with Rutland furnace cement in the tube for my pipe joints along with 3 screws. It seems to work fine so far. There are also some high temp silicone's out there that are a little more flexible that may work. Next year I might just have my pipe welded together for a permanent seal since its a short run of pipe anyway.
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page