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Should I Cover The Cube?

Post in 'The Wood Shed' started by velvetfoot, Jul 19, 2013.

  1. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Again, proof that top-covering the stacks works with great success!!

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  2. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Well scotty, the moisture coming out of the middle of the stack is even MORE restricted by the top covering, you did see some of the posts by people that stated stacking tight did not work for them that well. I dont think its a good idea to tell people how long it takes to dry your wood when you stack it in that manner, just dont take as long when you stack single rows and how you get away from some rot is beyond me.
  3. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    When you are limited on space, Sparky, you gotta do what you gotta do. Does wood stacked in single rows season faster? I'm sure it does. Does top covering help in making a cube of wood faster? I'm sure it does. The OP in this thread asked if his stack of wood will season the way it was stacked. We who stack in big blocks simply are stating that if he has a couple of years, and if he top-covers his wood, that yes it absolutely WILL season.....not in 6 months or even a year, but it WILL season that way. How is that deceiving anyone? We answered the original question.

    The moisture will make it out of that stack from the sides and bottom.....top covering keeps the additional rain and snow moisture from ever getting into the wood. And on yet another note, when I top cover the wood, I don't get mold in the stacks either.....
    Trilifter7 and Backwoods Savage like this.
  4. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Have you been reading the posts on here scotty for the last few years about drying wood? And there is a chance of rot with a wood pile like that, and are you reading the number of posts who stated they had problems with wood stacked that way? Best advice more air circulation.
    Why do you think there is a fair amout of people claim wood rots, I am guessing in part to poor stacking practices.
  5. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Scotty, is that your wood pile cross stacked, you are aware that is gonna be better then how the OP has his stacked.
  6. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    "Ever look into how a lumber kiln works? The keep it very high humidity, but add lots of heat to the kiln, to help "dry" the wood. What they are essentially doing is only "cooking" the moisture out of the wood, but the outside of the wood stays moist (to keep it from splitting)."
    Yes I have and the humidity (like you said) is just for the quality of the wood and even they say drying is much faster with low humidity and high air flow. Kilns can have some big fans for air movement and they drop the humidity as the moisture in the wood starts so come down.
  7. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Sparky, its only cross stacked on the ends and periodically every 8-10' or so......most of my stack is stacked just as the OP's. The cross-stacking adds stability to the ends and throughout the stack.
  8. Auzzie Gumtree

    Auzzie Gumtree Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2012
    Messages:
    375
    i too have to stack in the 'cube'. I have just started burning 24/7 this year. I am 2 months in with mixed results depending on wood species.

    My cube is 25 rows long x 4 pallets wide. Here's some pics. i think there is a bit of mould in there - not sure if that's the cubes fault or if it was on the wood when i stacked it.

    The wood i am using now has been stacked since March 2012 - so just over 12 months. some will burn very hot and long - others i had a problem with but i think it was rotten when i stacked it and it never recovered. i was going to try and stack enough for a full year in single file but it never happened and the pile keeps getting bigger. Overall though i have managed to keep the house very warm 24/7 with zero creosote build up which at the end of the day is what we are trying to achieve.

    the 3rd picture is how much i have used so far this year 4 rows of 4 pallets. I have started to top cover a couple of weeks worth just so its not wet when i have to restock the stack near the front door. i just drive down fill up the Ute and restack right out side the front door - it works for me. i made the rack out of an old bed i was throwing out.

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    Pallet Pete and ScotO like this.
  9. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    How many of those who've had problems had the wood top-covered? I'm betting that they didn't have it properly top-covered. That is the big factor in a large stack of wood.....top-covering it.
    Trilifter7 likes this.
  10. Pallet Pete

    Pallet Pete Guest

    I do make some big stacks and leave them open until the end of fall then top cover those I won't use for the winter. The stacks or piles that get used get covered in full with a 2*4 to help keep the tarp straight and on for the winter. Leaving it exposed as much as possible is the best thing you can do.

    Pete
  11. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Yes Pete, that's pretty much what I do. The first two years of being C/S/S, the wood gets no top cover......in the summer of the third year (before the wood is to be burned), I top-cover only the 3 year wood. However, I will probably top-cover all of it come late August......next year, it will all be put in my woodshed.
    Pallet Pete likes this.
  12. Trilifter7

    Trilifter7 Feeling the Heat

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    Beavercreek Ohio
    And not to forget climate too. If you get high amounts of rain annually like the east coast, west coast and parts of the Midwest then top covering would def help as well. Those in wetter climates that didnt top cover cubes are probably the same ones with "rotten" wood. Areas with less rain and avg drier climates can get away with leaving it uncovered. Like Scotty said, I would top cover if your going with a cube. If you're far enough ahead like Scotty is it won't matter if it takes an extra year or two to dry... Your not going to be burning it for 4 years anyway!!
    ScotO likes this.
  13. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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    Sand Lake, NY
    I guess I'll find out a few years from now. Hopefully it works out.
    I have a four row wide pile that gets good sun and is not covered and it looks real dry.
    I had another pallet wide pile that was covered that just I put in the garage for the winter that had some wetness to it; I think it might be because I hadn't tended to the cover for a long long time (ignored it)....I think it gathered and funneled water down in several places.
    So, if you go for long term top cover, you have to maintain the cover.
    I'm leaning towards not covering if in sun. But this cube thing new to me, and I hope to keep the rain out of the middle.
    Of course, there WILL be shrinkage, so who knows if the thing will hold together, cover and all, for 3 years.
  14. maple1

    maple1 Minister of Fire

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    Agree completely.

    However, if the large stack is sitting directly on the ground, and up against/under trees, it will not get the air movement that is needed to get the moisture out of the middle. And there is no way the bottom layer will dry out - it will just gradually decompose into the ground.
  15. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Well you can stack your wood any way you want to but you will not find any article any where that recomends stacking wood in that manner and in over 30 years of wood burning I have never had a problem with sizzling wood and have always stacked in single rows and in some cases burnt the wood that has cured over one long summer. I have been told (on this forum) I can not dry wood that quick but many factors to consider, not sure how many can make claims on how long it takes to dry wood and they dont stack in the best way possible.
  16. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    I agree with you, the direct ground contact isn't good (I mentioned that in one of my earlier posts on this thread). That is the hinge factor for me.

    So, velvetfoot, if you are reading this I would consider (yeah, its gonna be quite a job) getting that wood up off the ground somehow. If not, your bottom wood is gonna be sacrificed, and in a pile like that, that's a lotta wood you're gonna lose.
  17. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

  18. ScotO

    ScotO Guest

    Are you just now figuring that out?? ;)
    Bottom line is, wood stacked led in single rows will season faster, but when you got to maximize your space sometimes you gotta cube it. And when you cube it, if done correctly, it WILL season. Not as fast, and you gotta top cover it for a while (and get it off the ground), but it CAN and HAS been done by many, many members on here......
    Trilifter7 likes this.
  19. maple1

    maple1 Minister of Fire

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    Don't forget airflow-room around all sides. :)
    ScotO likes this.
  20. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    This site is full of dead horses.:p
  21. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    There is a lot of things done by many many menbers on here that I want no part of.:confused:
  22. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot Minister of Fire

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  23. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    So Scotty I have a question for you, and I am being serious, why do some of the very same people who stack in multiple rows give advice about the wood being stacked too tight for air flow, ran into some posts while doing a search. Both methods will reduce air flow to an extent.
    "Stack your wood loose enough to let a mouse through but not enough for a cat to chase it"
  24. Trilifter7

    Trilifter7 Feeling the Heat

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    I haven't been on here long but from most of the posts that I've read thru about that are directed to new or beginner burners who have no supply of wood. In those cases they are trying to burn there wood in the same year or soon after, requiring seasoning the wood as quickly as possible. But again you are neglecting 2 factors... 1. If you are far enough ahead then you don't need it to season in one year, or even two or three for that matter. 2. if you don't have the space to spread 27 cords !!! out in single rows in your yard... You do what you have to and make it fit. With 20+ cords C/S/S on hand you are certainly not in a hurry to burn that wood! So again, like Scotty said, get it off the ground and top covered and let it sit! It will be ready when you need it.
    chvymn99 and ScotO like this.
  25. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Some people will NEVER have the space for 2 or 3 years worth of wood, one of my point of this whole ordeal wat the advice given on here about how long it takes to dry wood. How many time have you seen a post talking about a site that says you can season some firewood in 6 months and peole cry bull shiit. So I was trying to make a point about such advice, if you dont have the room there are things (like scotty said) to help with drying in multiple rows.
    If I was doing it that way I would rather have the top covering off the wood so the air could flow over the top fo the stack better.
    Note that Scotty and BWS have a lot better stack job then the OP.

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