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Should I replace my current stove with an airtight stove?

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by UnknownLegend, Dec 30, 2012.

  1. UnknownLegend

    UnknownLegend New Member

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    Hello all,

    Let me start off by saying that I know very little about wood stoves, so I thought I'd turn to this forum for guidance.

    I just moved into a 576 square foot house with a wood stove. The wood stove is the only source of heat. Someone is offering me an airtight wood stove for free, and I wasn't sure if I should accept it or not. Here are some pictures of what I have currently have, as well as the airtight stove.

    The airtight stove is a Quadra Fire.

    Thanks for the help!

    Attached Files:

    raybonz likes this.

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  2. chimneylinerjames

    chimneylinerjames Feeling the Heat

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    Heck yes.
    Dune likes this.
  3. jatoxico

    jatoxico Minister of Fire

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    +,1 what model quad? Looks like a major upgrade. What is your current install like? Chimney wise I mean.
  4. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    Looks like a Quadrafire 3100. About $1800 dollars worth of stove.
  5. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    It's a no-brainer. That Quadrafire is a modern, efficient, clean wood burner. The existing old thing is an antique, inefficient, dirty wood burner. By all means take advantage of this opportunity...and then let's start talking about installation requirements. Welcome to the forums! Rick
  6. Jerry_NJ

    Jerry_NJ Minister of Fire

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    Yes !!! I have a Quad Insert (really an air tight stove that sits inside a fireplace opening)... it works great and is working right now. Whatever you pay ($$ or Sweat) for wood will return many more BTUs (Heat) with the Quad... and the Quad with well seasoned HW should be capable of an overnight burn, I doubt the old job will burn longer than 3 or 4 hours.

    Happy heating, and a great buy even if you had to pay $1,000 for it.
  7. wishlist

    wishlist Minister of Fire

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    Welcome to Hearth, you won't be "unknown" for long! You've already made the best choice possible, looking for advice. You'll will get lots of help along with most importantly sound advice on any swap or new install. Clearances must be met along with proper pipe etc..... take lots of pics and you'll be amazed how much help people on here will lend a hand. Also, be sure and stop by the wood shed for sound advice on everything from storing, stacking, and seasoning your wood. Backwoods Savage has been known to help more than a few people out !

    Oops, forgot. Heck yea get the free stove! :)
  8. Pallet Pete

    Pallet Pete Guest

    I would jump on it ! Far less wood consumption and much longer heat life. Be aware you need good dry wood not what a dealer says is dry but what is dry. Do you have room for drying wood outside? Can you split and stack wood? 20 percent moister is the general rule of thumb which is a year split and stacked in the wind minimum.

    Pete
  9. rkshed

    rkshed Feeling the Heat

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    Airtight is the way to go and the price is great!
  10. UnknownLegend

    UnknownLegend New Member

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    Wow thank you for the help! I'm not sure what there is to work with chimney-wise, but I will take pictures and upload them tomorrow during the daylight. The house is about 7 years old so I would hope the chimney is in good shape.

    As for the type of wood that will be used for burning, the previous owner left quite a few cords of wood that are very light and easy to burn. After we burn through them, we will use some newer cords that are about two years old. We keep them dry outside and bring a few pieces inside to stack for easily accessibility.
  11. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    Actually, the term "airtight" as applied to wood burning stoves is somewhat obsolete and was always somewhat misleading. Modern stoves are generally not referred to as being "airtight". Any stove requires a flow path for gases through from the combustion air inlet(s) to the outlet flue. There really isn't anything "airtight" about any of them. These days, what you want to look for is a stove that is both UL listed and EPA certified...that means it burns safely (provided it's installed correctly) and cleanly (environmentally speaking). Rick
    Pallet Pete and BrowningBAR like this.
  12. fossil

    fossil Accidental Moderator Staff Member

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    And tell us where you live, if you would. :)
  13. Waulie

    Waulie Minister of Fire

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    Sounds like a sweet deal!

    Now, not to be a downer but since nobody else asked: why is it free?

    Even is the stove has issues it's a great deal, but you have to be sure you understand what issues there are and what needs to be done with time and money to get that puppy safe and sound.

    Welcome too!
  14. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

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    It could be split in half and be safer than the Monkey Wards Franklin. I know. I used own one. The Franklin that is.
  15. corey21

    corey21 Minister of Fire

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    I would upgrade for sure.
  16. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Exactly. Modern EPA stoves are not airtight. They are designed so that they don't cut off all the air and let the fire smolder. And yet I see the term airtight still used in marketing literature... written by clueless marketing depts..

    Go for that offer. It's quite a generous one. Be sure to buy a case of beer/wine for the donor.
  17. HotCoals

    HotCoals Minister of Fire

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    I think the term "airtight" is referring to doors mostly..or anywhere gaskets are,like cook tops on some stoves.
    At least way more airtight then when Franklin and Round Oaks were popular.
  18. Woody Stover

    Woody Stover Minister of Fire

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    They are stingy with fuel, so it's accurate to call them wood-tight. ==c
    Gee, I wish somebody would offer me a free $1800 stove... ;lol
  19. Stella

    Stella Member

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    What a fantastic gift, I won't tell you what I paid for my stove which is similar in looks, I should snap their hand off! Happy burning and welcome to the forum where I have experienced plenty of help and friendly support as I have just had my wood burner installed.
    Pallet Pete and raybonz like this.
  20. raybonz

    raybonz Minister of Fire

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    Talk about a n0-brainer! I would be all over that Quadrafire 3100 if that is what it is! I just looked it up and it has ACC (automatic combustion control) Wow that sounds like a great feature and 13 hr. burn times too.. With a home that small you may need to crack a window on occasion..

    Ray
  21. Rich L

    Rich L Minister of Fire

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    Yo, at least fire up the old stove and share the experience with us.
  22. StihlHead

    StihlHead Guest

    Hmmmm, old Franklin or newer Quadrafire??? Likely the Quad is a steal of a good deal, but it depends on the flue requirements which can cost as much as a new stove to fit out. In which case free is not gonna be free. That Quadrafire stove can certainly roast you out of a less than 600 sq ft place. Certainly burns better that the old Frankie, but may not be needed for that small of a place. Depends on your location and insulation in the place.
  23. tcassavaugh

    tcassavaugh Minister of Fire

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    not really a hard decision to make. the old franklin looks like it has served its purpose over the years. give the quad a chance. should easily be able so set up the pipe and chimney for the quad. i have an old jotul 602 that was given to me back in 92 and still have it around although not currently using it. thought about a garage install, if the codes allow.

    cass
  24. semipro

    semipro Minister of Fire

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    Just to state the obvious...
    Others here have referred to the newer stove as "efficient".
    What that means to you, as compared to using the older stove, is more heat produced per wood used so less lugging, loading, and ash handling.
    Once you work your way through the firewood you have it will mean less work (cutting, splitting, stacking) or money to get the firewood you need.
    A more efficient stove typically emits less pollution also.

    Keep in mind that that the stove and chimney are a "system". The best stove in the world won't work well without a good flue, and "good" doesn't necessarily mean big.
    raybonz likes this.
  25. UnknownLegend

    UnknownLegend New Member

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    The old stove has treated us well, but most of the heat seems to go up the chimney rather than stay in the house. Kept us decently warm I guess.

    We're having the new stove installed today - I'll keep you posted on how everything goes! The new stove is actually coming from an elderly lady who says she bought the wrong stove, she wanted a stove in her house that would mostly be for looks and not for heating purposes. So she wants to swap hers with ours. Seems very kind of her.
    raybonz likes this.

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