Soundproofing basement ceiling??

Swedishchef Posted By Swedishchef, Dec 12, 2012 at 9:31 AM

  1. Swedishchef

    Swedishchef
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 17, 2010
    3,260
    701
    Loc:
    Inuvik, Northwest Territories
    Hey guys

    My basement ceiling is currently not finished. A big issue is that sound transfers through the floor to the upstairs incredibly easy. It is impossible to have a phone conversation downstairs without hearing it upstairs. So imagine if I want to watch movies, sports, etc.

    I plan on installing gyprock on the ceiling for an easy finish. What should I do to help block the sound? I am looking for the most affordable/simplistic installation. I know I could install Roxul safe and sound between the joists but I was wondering what other (if any) options are out there.

    I know that drop ceilings can have accoustic tiles, etc. But gyprock will cost me about $400, a drop ceiling (nice one to please the Mrs) will cost me about 3K (I have about 850 sq ft to do).

    Cheers

    Andrew
     
  2. semipro

    semipro
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 12, 2009
    3,090
    483
    Loc:
    SW Virginia
  3. Swedishchef

    Swedishchef
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 17, 2010
    3,260
    701
    Loc:
    Inuvik, Northwest Territories
    Very interesting link...thanks for the information. Does anybody have stories of their particular setup?

    Tks

    A
     
  4. SIERRADMAX

    SIERRADMAX
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 13, 2011
    300
    25
    Loc:
    RI
    Check out convoluted acoustical foam.
     
  5. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jul 22, 2008
    17,523
    3,801
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    . . . just don't set off any indoor pyrotechnics. :(
     
  6. SIERRADMAX

    SIERRADMAX
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 13, 2011
    300
    25
    Loc:
    RI
    Yes, RI had a tragic nightclub fire that engulfed in seconds from an indoor pyrotechnic event. What was lined on the inside walls.... acoustical foam.
     
  7. stee6043

    stee6043
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Aug 22, 2008
    2,529
    236
    Loc:
    West Michigan
    I would tend to think standard fiberglass insulation between the joists along with your gyprock would provide significant sound deadening. I doubt you'll find many chaper alternatives than standard insulation. If you really want to go nuts put up a layer of insulation (cheapo R13), screw up some OSB and then do your gyprock. But put some rubber washers between the gyprock and OSB. I can hear the silence from here....
     
  8. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jul 22, 2008
    17,523
    3,801
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    Seeing where you live I figured you would pick up what I was writing . . . very tragic fire for both those who died and for those who survived.
     
  9. Swedishchef

    Swedishchef
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 17, 2010
    3,260
    701
    Loc:
    Inuvik, Northwest Territories
    I think I will pass on the foam.

    I have been reading lots about green glue...and using all kinds of nifty products. This website seems to give tons of information and products options depending on the budget.

    http://www.soundproofingcompany.com/

    A
     
  10. RSNovi

    RSNovi
    Feeling the Heat 2.
    NULL
    

    May 12, 2010
    349
    34
    Loc:
    Michigan
    When I installed a drop ceiling, it really made it quiet in the basement. The tiles I used were thicker ones which I liked the looks of, but also had a decent sound attenuation value.
     
  11. ironpony

    ironpony
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 22, 2010
    2,069
    585
    Loc:
    mid-ohio via St.Croix USVI
    you can not attach panels directly to the joists, there must be some sort of seperation I.E. drop ceiling suspended from wires.. anything attached to the joist will transmit sound upstairs. example building a soundproof wall comprises of 2 seperate 2x4 walls, studs staggered and insulation woven between the studs. same principle on the ceiling, can not have any direct contact. have built theater rooms and this is what works, insulating between the studs helps but as long as ther is contact to the joists, there will be noise. drop ceiling is one option and drywall grid is another
     
  12. woodgeek

    woodgeek
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 27, 2008
    3,620
    630
    Loc:
    SE PA
    If you go the FG batt route.....IIRC compressing a thicker batt into the space will improve performance (more mass/density). I have found the price per sq ft for different thickness batts to be remarkably similar.
     
  13. ironpony

    ironpony
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 22, 2010
    2,069
    585
    Loc:
    mid-ohio via St.Croix USVI
    the other possibility is to drape fabric under the joists, this will also work depending on the look you are going for. in our theater room there are black and burgandy drapes on the walls and black fabric on the ceiling.
     
  14. velvetfoot

    velvetfoot
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Dec 5, 2005
    9,226
    684
    Loc:
    Sand Lake, NY
    May I ask what kind of fabric on the ceiling, and how is it attached?
     
  15. Swedishchef

    Swedishchef
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 17, 2010
    3,260
    701
    Loc:
    Inuvik, Northwest Territories
    ironpony: what do you mean by drywall grid? Would you use sound isolation strips to hang the drywall? I had thought about using these with 2 sheets of drywall with greenglue in between....

    A
     
  16. ironpony

    ironpony
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 22, 2010
    2,069
    585
    Loc:
    mid-ohio via St.Croix USVI
    very similar to ceiling tile grid but heavier wire and cross bars. you screw the drywall to it and it all hangs like a drop ceiling
     
  17. ironpony

    ironpony
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 22, 2010
    2,069
    585
    Loc:
    mid-ohio via St.Croix USVI
    it was a haeavier material we picked ouit at the fabric store. not really sure what to call it. we stapled it and let it drape between the floor joist I think every third joist was stapled
     
  18. greg13

    greg13
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 5, 2012
    609
    136
    Loc:
    CNY
    What you could try is a double sheetrock ceiling. Lay the first layer up between joists a few inches up and lay the second layer like a regular ceiling. This will create a dead air space with layers of sheetrock to help deaden the noise. It will take some cutting & fitting for the first layer but it should help.
     
  19. Swedishchef

    Swedishchef
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 17, 2010
    3,260
    701
    Loc:
    Inuvik, Northwest Territories
    Greg: Thanks for the idea but the problem is that I have I-beams for joists which make fitting near impossible. Especially since I want to install recessed lighting.

    Ugh. This is getting complicated. LOL. I just want to be able to watch a movie and not bother anybody.

    Andrew
     
  20. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jul 22, 2008
    17,523
    3,801
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    That's what I do since my wife and I often work different schedules and I don't want to wake her. I have a half-way decent pair of wireless Sennheisers fed off my surround sound system that do a pretty decent job . . . I may not get quite as much of the earth shaking bass or full range of sound as the sound system, but the trade off is I can hear conversations in the TV show or movie quite well . . . and no irate, half-awake, half-asleep wife.
     
  21. semipro

    semipro
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 12, 2009
    3,090
    483
    Loc:
    SW Virginia
    What if you were to attach furring strips to the bottom of the i-joists with some sort of flexible isolators and then attach drywall to the furring?
    You could also blow in cellulose insulation above the drywall. Its relatively cheap and easy to do.
     
  22. Swedishchef

    Swedishchef
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 17, 2010
    3,260
    701
    Loc:
    Inuvik, Northwest Territories
    Ha ha. I already do that. I should have said " I just want to be able to watch a movie, play XBOX360 with friends without headphones and not have my wife tell me to turn it down because the kids are sleeping". I think it is now worded better. lol

    Smipro: I think that is what I will end up doing. I may just install 1/2 nch drywall with isolators and some fiberglass insulation between. Roxul is too rich for my blood. On top of that I may just install 1/4 inch drywall with green glue to the 1/2 inch piece in 2X2 squares and put strapping along the seams instead of taping. It would look like I have a 2X2 tile ceiling.

    Jake: then again, I could just install drywall and get some nice earphones :)

    Decisions decisions.

    A
     
  23. semipro

    semipro
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 12, 2009
    3,090
    483
    Loc:
    SW Virginia
    I suspect that the medium pack cellulose you could achieve with big box equipment would be a great sound damper, much better than fiberglass batts. Also, easier and less itchy to install.

    I've thought about doing what you describe with the strapping along the seams so I can remove sections to access stuff.
     
  24. RustyShackleford

    RustyShackleford
    Minister of Fire 2.
    NULL
    

    Jan 6, 2009
    910
    58
    Loc:
    NC
    I'm surprised no one mentioned (or not surprised if I missed it) SoundStop board, made by Celotex. It comes in 1/2" 4x8ft sheets that cost $10-15 each IIRC. I put a layer of this underneath the drywall (on one side) in some critical partitions (between common areas and bedrooms) when I built my house; I also put fiberglass between the studs. It works very well.

    I see no reason you couldn't put this SoundStop underneath the flooring. Batts between joists or studs doesn't work that well, because the wood provides a coupling between the surfaces on each side. But it's cheap, but insufficient by itself I'd think.
     

Share This Page