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Summit Flame shield cleaning

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by 69911e, Dec 31, 2012.

  1. 69911e

    69911e Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2010
    Messages:
    73
    Loc:
    CT
    Does the Summit Flame shield require cleaning? If there is ash or any build up between the shield and top plate, the heat transfer would be reduced.

    It appears it's function is to protect the top plate from direct flame. I am not sure why this is required. I would expect the efficiency of the unit to be better if this were removed or modified with many small holes to act as a flame trap.

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  2. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2006
    Messages:
    6,674
    Loc:
    Next to nuke plant Berwick, PA.
    It is exactly as it is named, a heat shield, to protect the stove top from getting too hot as this is the path of the flame with limited space between it and the baffle.
    I would suggest not drilling holes into it, that ain't gonna do nothing but unnecessarily void the warranty.
    There is no cleaning needed as there is no build up between the two surfaces, and the part taking the flame doesn't get a real big build up on it either.
    You can always run a scraper along the bottom face when the baffle is out for sweeping.
  3. 69911e

    69911e Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2010
    Messages:
    73
    Loc:
    CT
    I was not suggesting removing or modifying, just postulating.

    Hogwildz: Thanks for the data there is no buildup which occurs above the shield. I have not removed mine and you saved me some time. Just curious: was the bolt stuck when you checked yours to verify no buildup?
  4. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2006
    Messages:
    6,674
    Loc:
    Next to nuke plant Berwick, PA.
    The bolt was actually corroded. I replaced mine with a s.s. bolt, washer & nut, and also coated the threads with never seize. I took mine apart only to see what it was all about. The flame shield also rest in a channel in the front of the stove. I'm thinking around the air wash channel. I have been in and around most of the parts on this insert for the past 6 years. The only things I don't know about are inside the enclosed channels. It is a well built and well thought out stove. I personally see no need for modifications in my case. I have some ideas for the baffle, but have not implimented anything as of yet. I do make my own baffle gaskets though, which last much much longer than stock ones.
  5. 69911e

    69911e Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2010
    Messages:
    73
    Loc:
    CT
    I decided to check my shield yesterday as I found the bolt not rusted. I found about .05" to .1" of very fine ash on top of the flame shield. This in conjunction with the air gap definitely adds an insulating layer.

    I also made 2 changes internal to the stove and 2 on the top heat recovery portion of the stove above. The internal changes I will not post until I fully quantify and analyze the effects.

    The changes to the top of the insert:
    1: Move the front cover up to the top of the surround air channel. This allows air flow over the entire 1/4" plate top which is where the heat is recovered from. The original position of the cover effectively insulates the 1/4" plate stove top (150 deg temp drop).
    2: Add additional air deflectors to have even airflow on the entire top surface. I found the right 1/3 side tremendously lacking in airflow (85 +% less).
    These changes recovered more heat from the insert.

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