1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)
    Caluwe - Passion for Fire and Water ( Pellet and Wood Hydronic and Space Heating)

taking the inside out of an old VC resolute

Post in 'The Hearth Room - Wood Stoves and Fireplaces' started by mikedengineer, Jul 26, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. mikedengineer

    mikedengineer New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2005
    Messages:
    94
    Loc:
    mentor(northeast), ohio
    I need some advice. I have an old vermont casting resolute stove. It has double doors with glass. I bought it from someone who used it very little (about two years). It sat in his garage till i got it last year. I used it this past winter and it kept me my wife and I very warm. It seemed to work fine. At least once a day I would have a very hot fire to keep creosote from building up. I got to thinking if there was any creosote built up inside. So I wanted to remove the interior pieces. I started by taking off the caste iron plate that holds the damper in place and there was a coffee can amount of stuff (creosote) that fell from the chimney (the chimney goes straight up). I cleaned that area out pretty well. Is this the only place I should be cleaning?

    I took off the left side piece to get to the back piece. I tried to get the right side piece off, but could not get that one out. I got the screw out and it just wiggles. Should I even bother going further? Is there any reason to get the back piece off? Would it be creosotty and need cleaning?

    Also do I need to be putting gasket cement in the joints of these inner pieces?

    -Mike

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. webbie

    webbie Seasoned Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    12,109
    Loc:
    Western Mass.
    You need to find the manual which addresses that particular stove.
    Dig around on the CFM site, or try the people at Black Swan Stove. Even an exploded parts diagram might help.

    The rear channels can sometimes get full of soot and slow the draft. In most cases, you can use a vacuum or blower (outside) to get much of this flyash out.

    I do believe that furnace cement was used in most the interior assemblies.
  3. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

    Got an air compressor and blow gun? Do not preform this in your home or your better half will be extremely pissed at you.
    About every 3 years I disconect my stoves wheel it out in the driveway. With a paint spray hood, respirator , Blow gun and compressor I blow that sucker out. I also shop vac it out. IF seams are leaking, that cloud of ash will expose that real quick. Refractory cement or gasket cement any seame that leaks. I blow them off to remove any ash or debris. I then apply a healthy bead of caulk refactory / gasket cement. A squeeze tube also is handy, in hard and tight spaces where a caulking gun can not fit.

    Want to really check out your stove? I stick the end of the air hose in the fire box threw the flue collar. I close all doors and air inlets the in deflate a plastic or rubber ball and place it in the flue collar and with portable air tank. I inflate it in the flue collar area, similar to what a plumber does for plugs on vent lines. I them set the compressor to 20 to 30 lbs and turn it on. You will feel an see and hear the air leaks. It will tell you whether your door gaskets or griddle gaskets leaks. Just feel around the outside you can feel the air leaking . Some use smoke bombs to discover leaks. but this works better. Griddle gaskets should be changed every 4 years.

    Btw every bolt I remove I replace with stainless steel. Makes it easier getting them out the next time. Every 12+- years cast iron stoves should rebuilt re doing all refractory seams. but you can extend that rebuilding if you do a what I outlined.
  4. mikedengineer

    mikedengineer New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2005
    Messages:
    94
    Loc:
    mentor(northeast), ohio
    Do I need to put cement in between those cast iron pieces? These pieces do NOT seal to the outside. They serve as an internal passageway for air and flame path.

    Does anyone have any hints on pulling the right side piece out? Maybe someone who has done this on this particular stove.

    Thanks for the stainless steel idea.

    -Mike
  5. elkimmeg

    elkimmeg Guest

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page