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The Effect of Wood Stove Heat on Paneling?

Post in 'DIY and General non-hearth advice' started by soupy1957, Apr 7, 2013.

  1. soupy1957

    soupy1957 Minister of Fire

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    The wife and I had undergone construction and renovation in our home a couple of years ago. One of the additions was a front porch.

    The Painter who was sub-Contracted by our Builder, did some painting in the front living room, about which I have posted a thread or two in here because of peeling.

    Fast forward to today, and the recent decision the wife and I made to put in ceiling paneling that looks like the "real" tongue-n-groove boards that we had put in, in the rest of the house.

    What effect (affect?) if any, would the wood stove have on paneling on the ceiling in the living room? (First off, I recognize that we'd want to let the glue dry fully, before firing up the wood stove. Thankfully, we are into Spring at this point, and don't "need" the wood stove right now, for the most part. The paneling will be nailed as well, but even the Builder stated that the nails for the paneling are only there to let the glue set up).

    I'm concerned that, even after the glue has fully dried, the paneling COULD warp or sag (in spite of adequate gluing and nailing) from the temps generated from the wood stove.

    Real concern? No, don't worry? Your thoughts appreciated.........

    Soupy1957

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  2. KaptJaq

    KaptJaq Minister of Fire

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    Is it wood or some form of composite? If they are not solid all wood panels, do you have or can you get the product data sheet from the manufacturer? Have you ever measured the temperature above the stove? How hot does it get during a high burn? How high is the ceiling?

    KaptJaq
  3. soupy1957

    soupy1957 Minister of Fire

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    Room temps get to about 80 to 85º F when the stove is cranking. I'm sure that "Paneling" is a composite material with available Datasheets, (although we haven't chosen the Paneling we want yet. Doing that tomorrow. I'm assuming we would/should choose a high-grade paneling; thus the question).
  4. jharkin

    jharkin Minister of Fire

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    Any particular reason you want composite vs. Real wood? Wood would probably take the heat better than any plastic and not necessarily more expensive.
    ScotO likes this.
  5. soupy1957

    soupy1957 Minister of Fire

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    money.........we're running out.

    Logic said, after numerous failed attempts to re-paint the ceiling without having more "peeling" taking place, that we needed another alternative. Believe me.........I would have chosen "real wood" if I could have afforded it!!

    -Soupy1957
  6. remkel

    remkel Minister of Fire

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    Soupy-

    The room may be 85, but the temps at the ceiling directly above the stove will be higher...I have measured up to 135 degrees above my stove, and I suspect there have been higher temps. The sds (safety data sheet) will tell you the flash point for any material....
  7. Nick Mystic

    Nick Mystic Minister of Fire

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    Assuming you have the proper clearances to your ceiling for your stove placement I don't think temperature fluctuations will be as much of a problem as changes in humidity. Wood stoves tend to dry out the room unless you make an effort to control humidity with a humidifier or lots of water evaporation containers on top of the stove. If the paneling were to buckle after installation it is most likely going to be due to moisture changes in the wood or composite material the panels are made from.
    midwestcoast likes this.
  8. gerry100

    gerry100 Minister of Fire

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    You 're not worried about the falshpoint but more the HDT( heat distortion temperature) of the resin holding it together. Composites I'm familiar with use Polyehtylene and wood fiber( think old milk jugs and sawdust) and should stand 135degF without warp.

    Warp in plastics is a result of temperature and stress. If the paneling has room to expand thermally that should also prevent warping/bowing. Follow the nailng/gluing instructions that come with the product closely.
    midwestcoast likes this.
  9. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Make sure your paneling wood is dry at least 3 years before putting it up. ;)

    Seriously, The heat at the ceiling will dry the paneling out for sure, so get it as dry as possible before putting it up to minimize shrinkage.
  10. Hogwildz

    Hogwildz Minister of Fire

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    Composite is prolly less likely to move and warp, then real wood. Real wood expands and contracts much more than composite. I have had ok luck with my tongue and groove pine on the walls & ceiling, but have not stove going tin the addition yet. The doors in there and throughout the house are a different story. The panels always move in the summer and winter, winter contraction of course showing more and the unstained portions of the panels show as they shrink. Looks like trial and error is going to be your tell all.
    nate379 and woodgeek like this.
  11. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Yes, real wood can and does move. Our white oak floor in front of the stove shows slight shrinkage in the winter when the house is dry and it is under constant heat. Usually about this time of year it starts returning to normal, but maybe not. I just lit up the fire last night. We are getting a cold front coming through.
  12. jharkin

    jharkin Minister of Fire

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    Most of my experience with plastics is stuff like azek PVC trim. That can expand so much just from the heat of the sun that you have to leave big gaps for it to move. Wood doesn't expand nearly as much.

    Maybe these composite interior materials are not as bad?
  13. gerry100

    gerry100 Minister of Fire

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    Wood expands by absorbing moisture, plastics absorb much less moisture but do expand with temperature. Polyehtylene with wood filler will have a much lower coefficient of expansion than neat PVC, but a long run of 8-12ft could "grow" enough to cause problems if not installed properly
  14. DexterDay

    DexterDay Guest

    Is this a T1-11 type paneling? If so, it will likely warp. My wall is just over 36" from my 30-NC and after 2 seasons has really done a number on it.

    The ceiling is much higher, so if its a thicker stronger material? Than there should be no problems.

    Here is a pic of wall. We will be tearing it out this Summer and opening up the basement and finishing most of it...

    2013-04-07_22-16-34_316.jpg
  15. soupy1957

    soupy1957 Minister of Fire

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    correct on both counts

    -Soupy1957
  16. soupy1957

    soupy1957 Minister of Fire

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    Proper clearances exist in our application, yes. We use an ornate cast Iron container on the stove, for moisture, yes.
    I'm of the opinion currently, that even the "best" paneling product, COULD compromise. Just trying to figure out if it's likely or not, and what will give first........the glue, or the nails.

    -Soupy1957
  17. soupy1957

    soupy1957 Minister of Fire

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    THAT gives some measure of comfort. Appreciate it. The paneling is being installed by a "Professional" so.........I'll hold THEM to the fire, if it warps.

    -Soupy1957
  18. soupy1957

    soupy1957 Minister of Fire

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    The Paneling has not been chosen yet. We are going down today to our local supplier for that purpose. Please advise (I'm thinking "thicker" is better, albeit more costly of course) what thickness of Paneling is going to be the best choice for a ceiling application, in a room with a wood stove.

    -Soupy1957
  19. woodgeek

    woodgeek Minister of Fire

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    I agree with Jags that a composite might be more stable in this application than real wood. I am only familiar with a plastic impregnated wood veneer on composite backing product, from the Despot, that was rated to survive getting wet. That is, my buddy put it on a basement slab. That stuff is not going to shrink and expand with moisture, but snaps together to form a floating floor (no glue). I would if possible try to leave a little gapping, so I would avoid products that are designed to 'snap together' and float.
  20. soupy1957

    soupy1957 Minister of Fire

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    If what I'm hearing is what we call a "suspended ceiling" .........I'd imagine the cost to be higher than we'd be able to go, but I'm not sure about that. Materials for the Paneling choice, will probably run us a couple of thousand dollars (best guess til later this morning).

    -Soupy1957
  21. soupy1957

    soupy1957 Minister of Fire

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    When looking at the Paneling in the store, how can I verify the age of the Paneling? I'm certain I can't convince the wife to store the Paneling for 3 years before doing the build. I'm sure there are most likely "Manufacturing Dates" on the product, but I don't know if I will be able to translate them. I'd also doubt that product would be 3 years on the shelves from manufacture to sale, unless they were inferior or undesirable in some way.

    Also, let's talk thickness.........obviously the thicker/the heavier, but aside from the weight issue, I'd think "thicker" would mean less warpage potential, right? What are the typical thicknesses of Paneling these days?

    It's not just the Paneling I'm concerned with in this application. She also wants to put up two 16 foot runs of those foam "fake" Beams, not only for looks, but apparently they have a functional value, as they hide the seams between the Panels..........they TOO would have to have integrity in a hot room, without meltdown.

    -Soupy1957
  22. ironpony

    ironpony Minister of Fire

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    wood product more than likely is going to have some warpage, shrinkage, movement, to it. I have alot of wood in my house, floors, railings etc. they all shrink in the winter and close up in the spring on.
  23. woodgeek

    woodgeek Minister of Fire

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    One bad coat of paint (peeling) is hard to fix, everything afterwards peels. Could re-drywall for $1-2/sq ft, and get a decent painter to prime and paint.
    Or....looks like tin ceiling tiles cost $4 a sq ft for materials, install should go fast/cheap. Won't warp.

    At any rate, if your wood/composite solution is a lot more than these ideas....might want to pause.
    pen likes this.
  24. soupy1957

    soupy1957 Minister of Fire

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    Materials: $500.00 for everything.......paneling, nails, adhesive, faux beams, trim, shipping.

    -Soupy1957
  25. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

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    Before doing anything, have you nailed down exactly what the source of the peeling paint is? Is this condensation caused? If the source of the problem is not addressed, the paneling could have similar or worse issues.

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