1. Welcome Hearth.com Guests and Visitors - Please enjoy our forums!
    Hearth.com GOLD Sponsors who help bring the site content to you:
    Hearthstone Soapstone and Cast-Iron stoves( Wood, Gas or Pellet Stoves and Inserts)

The leaves aren't falling yet....

Post in 'The Inglenook' started by Mrs. Krabappel, Aug 19, 2012.

  1. Mrs. Krabappel

    Mrs. Krabappel Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,568
    Loc:
    Blue Ridge Mountains NC
    but the stoves and accessories are stocked at Lowe's.

    Time to dust of the the Hearth Gods,[​IMG] I mean Hearth Mods. 'Tis the season!

    As for me, I'm probably more prepared than any other winter, though I've come to the conclusion that I might save time AND money by having wood delivered c/s/s.

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. fishingpol

    fishingpol Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2010
    Messages:
    2,052
    Loc:
    Merrimack Valley, MA
    Waning days of summer. Pictures from Parker River NWR last week. Not too many of these warm sunsets left this summer.

    IMG_1078.JPG


    Sandpipers getting the feed on for migration soon.

    IMG_1057.JPG



    Stores have Halloween candy out already.<>
    Adios Pantalones likes this.
  3. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    29,151
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    I decided that last year. Not for cost reasons, just for pain avoidance. Then my neighbor calls and says he had a bunch of big trees dropped in his yard and didn't have them buck them and haul them off because he knew I wanted the wood.

    Groan.

    I will be happy to wait many more weeks before I offer up a Super Cedar to the Fire Gods.
  4. Beetle-Kill

    Beetle-Kill Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2009
    Messages:
    1,849
    Loc:
    Colorado- near the Divide
    The exercise has a value to it also. My father (79) and his neighbor (84ish) cut , split, and deliver about 20 cord a year. Neither needs the money, they do it for fun.
    Inspirational couple of old farts.
  5. joescho

    joescho Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2009
    Messages:
    363
    Loc:
    Northeastern PA
    Uggh.

    My back hurts just thinking about that. Please tell me you did not do it on a 80 or 90 degree day. I'll have heat stroke for you right now....
  6. Blue Vomit

    Blue Vomit Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2011
    Messages:
    663
    Loc:
    eastern PA
    I love the fall but dread raking, blowing, and picking up the leaves. Easily my least favorite chore.
  7. BrowningBAR

    BrowningBAR Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    7,607
    Loc:
    Doylestown, PA
    I've already done the math; cut, split, delivered makes more sense to me. Both, financially and time saving.
  8. Shadow&Flame

    Shadow&Flame Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2011
    Messages:
    788
    Loc:
    Central Arkansas
    I am ready...been too damn hot and dry here.

    I do a little bit of both on the wood front. There is a guy that will deliver wood much cheaper than what I would dream of charging for it...so I buy at least
    a cord every year from him. I do scrounge when I get the chance, but its better to have too much than not enough...I tend to give away alot of what I scrounge anyway. Gotta keep my older neighbors and relatives warm ya know.
    BrowningBAR likes this.
  9. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    49,101
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    That'll work, but have them deliver in April.
    Backwoods Savage likes this.
  10. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
    Messages:
    5,740
    Loc:
    Northern MI - in the mitten
    It's crossed my mind as well.
    Went out back mid-afternoon to cut up the oak posts and stringers I pulled up a few days ago.
    One hour later and all I got done was about 16 small logs. Jeesh.:mad:
    I'll keep at it, but perhaps supplement with c/s/d next year.
    Every time I go outside, I see all the trees that need to come down, and just shake my head.
    Oh, and our lone birch started dropping leaves a couple weeks ago.
  11. dafattkidd

    dafattkidd Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2007
    Messages:
    1,559
    Loc:
    Sound Beach, LINY
    This is about what I've been doing the past two years. I found a guy who delivers wood for so cheap I can't justify spending so much time scrounging as I've done in years past. I still scrounge a couple cords a year, but buying two cords this year to burn next year seems to work well for me, and takes the pressure off my scrounge demands. However, I scored a jackpot scrounge at work recently and don't think I'll need to buy wood in the spring.
    Shadow&Flame likes this.
  12. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    29,151
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    I plan on buying the greenist stuff around as cheaply as possible. Since three years are on the stacks. And the rest of this stuff from the neighbor will do year four. I think a delivery might have time to dry.

    These days I just hope I am around to burn the stuff. <>
    Shadow&Flame likes this.
  13. Mrs. Krabappel

    Mrs. Krabappel Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,568
    Loc:
    Blue Ridge Mountains NC
    I've had a lot of wood that has needed splitting forever. I figured it would get done this summer. It was happening too slowly, so I rented a splitter. A friend was up from Atlanta on "vacation." She and the kid ran the splitter. For an entire weekend. I was cutting up some trees the neighbor had dropped. All the wood was scrounged.

    The costs:
    splitter rental
    gas for splitter and saw
    new chain plus sharpened chain.
    advil
    advil
    advil
    take out food because nobody stopped to cook

    Intangible costs:
    several wasp stings
    wear and tear on our bodies
    running too close to a due date on a big assignment for school
    no day at the lake
    possibly losing a great friendship (nah, she's coming up next weekend to rehab the kitchen. At least I hope she is.)

    I love to cut and split, but the truth is I have so little time it just ends up stressing me out all the time that I am way behind.] I don't think I saved much money over buying it.
    Plus nobody is allowed to go to the hospital, because my emergency room costs are worth 2-3 cords of wood.
    firebroad likes this.
  14. BrotherBart

    BrotherBart Hearth.com LLC Mid-Atlantic Division Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    29,151
    Loc:
    Northern Virginia
    Yep. The year I chainsawed my leg in the 80's wood was a hundred a cord split and delivered. ER cost to sew me up was $300.25. Not to mention the cost of the pair of jeans. Three cord does the winter nicely.

    Buy it. That way that new saw stays nice and clean for a long time. But drain the fuel out of it and fire it up and run it dry. I don't think you need the macho creds Teach. You slept in the woods. Most here ain't done that.
    PapaDave likes this.
  15. Mrs. Krabappel

    Mrs. Krabappel Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,568
    Loc:
    Blue Ridge Mountains NC
    I told myself that after I went on "Bombs Away" at the Cali water park. The floor just drops out from under you and you free fall.



    I have some trees around the place I need to clean up, plus a couple more trees at the neighbors, so the saw will still be busy. I think I'll buy a couple of years worth just to get ahead, then continue to scrounge really easy access stuff.
    PapaDave likes this.
  16. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Messages:
    6,450
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    I love raking leaves. You would too, if your property had 40 walnut trees! Have you ever tried to rake up 100,000 walnuts?

    Definitely... but I enjoy the excercise and time outdoors.
  17. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    15,450
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    I've always had a question . . . and it's probably a dumb one . . . can you eat the walnuts?

    I mean up here the apple trees I have on my property grow apples, but since I don't prune them or spray them they're not very good looking . . . although in some years I get a bunch and use them to make apple crisp. I was wondering if it was the same way with walnut trees -- do the walnuts look like the ones you see in the stores or if not treated, pruned, etc. you don't end up with a nut that looks or tastes very good?
  18. Joful

    Joful Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    Messages:
    6,450
    Loc:
    Philadelphia
    Well, the walnuts have a husk on them, which makes them the size of a large plum or a crab-apple when they fall. This husk is very tough, and must be removed before the walnut begins to rot. So, you could eat them, but you'd have to gather them up, remove the husks, and then dry the nut inside. If you let the husk begin to rot, it produces a dark colored oil which is used for making dark furniture stains. If you get that stuff on you (or on your boots, and then your carpet... DAMHIKT), you will never get it off.

    I've been toying with the idea of buying and modifying a golf ball collector from a local driving range, for the express purpose of picking up walnuts. Maybe then I could entertain selling them.
  19. firefighterjake

    firefighterjake Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    15,450
    Loc:
    Unity/Bangor, Maine
    Thanks . . . may have seemed like a simple question, but not having walnut trees up this way, I didn't know.
  20. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    15,270
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    Jake - old timers used to take the green husked walnuts and throw them on the driveway. After a week or two of driving over them the husks would peel pretty easy. Then they would take the nuts out to the shop and run them through the vise to get them to crack. Then ya gotta talk somebody into making bread or cookies. (if they are black walnuts, you will only want to use about 1/4 the amount called for because of the intense flavor. Sounds like fun doesn't it?

    I love fall - I just don't like what comes after that.
  21. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    I love the fall. We live in the woods and have lots of leaves. We've never raked them nor do we plan on doing so. Exception is to clear just a small amount right next to the house if it needs done. Usually Mother Nature makes enough wind to do the job for us.
  22. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan
    Walnuts are good. Yes, you must remove the husks, or shells and many do that by simply throwing them on the driveway and running over them to loosen the husks or shells. Store in onion bags hanging from a rafter and don't try to split until mid winter at the earliest.

    One thing that is good to do though with walnuts as with hickory nuts. Before gathering lots, crack 3 or 4 and make sure there is meat inside. If no meat; no picking up of the nuts.
  23. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2007
    Messages:
    27,816
    Loc:
    Michigan

    Jags, sorry I had not ready your post before posting and I see you covered the part about running over the nuts. Good advice.

    Here's more; wear rubber gloves when handling them. You can also crack them with a hammer.
  24. Mrs. Krabappel

    Mrs. Krabappel Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2010
    Messages:
    1,568
    Loc:
    Blue Ridge Mountains NC
    What is this raking leaves you speak of?
    [​IMG]
    Shadow&Flame and PapaDave like this.
  25. PapaDave

    PapaDave Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
    Messages:
    5,740
    Loc:
    Northern MI - in the mitten
    Ditto, Kathleen, why waste valuable energy?
    I use the mower and make 'em go into the driveway, where they stay and get smushed further by the Jeep. They also get mulched into the yard.
    However, if you were using them for compost, that's a whole 'nother sitchitation.

Share This Page