Tree length wood

heydan Posted By heydan, Oct 7, 2006 at 12:11 PM

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  1. heydan

    heydan
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    Jun 16, 2006
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    I gotta love the fact that I can get tree length wood delivered for $80 per cord or less. But I've never worked with tree length wood and I have one big question -- how heavy is a tree length piece of wood? Can a single person move it? I don't know what I'd do with a 5 cord pile of tree length logs if I couldn't budge any of them.
     
  2. heydan

    heydan
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    Jun 16, 2006
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    Yes, I got another reply from the guy and he says you're supposed to cut 16" pieces right off the pile of logs and then you can move those. Photo of tree length wood attached.
     

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  3. Dave_1

    Dave_1
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    Jul 19, 2006
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    Fwiw.

    1) Where are the logs going to be dumped?

    2) Is the spouse / neighbors / subdivision going to get upset by that location? Will they get more upset if the logs are still there a month later?

    3) Is the terrain relatively flat? If not chock better chock the bottom tree well as your safety depends on it, & cut up the top tree first working down the pile. Obviously the bottom tree is the last one you cut

    4) Do you already have a wood shed built that will accommodate the 5 cords?

    As Dylan stated, you definitely have a lot of work ahead, especially if there are timelines that must be met. The good side is that you are not in a forest, having to work around limbs, stumps, etc. Good luck with it.

    Dave
     
  4. heydan

    heydan
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    Jun 16, 2006
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    Yes, I happen to have enough (flat) space to store a giant pile of logs out of sight for as long as I need to. I also have enough seasoned wood for this winter so I'm not in a hurry. I assume that uncut logs can sit on the ground for a year or more with no serious ill effects?

    No, I don't have a wood shed. I'd have to just stack it on pallets with a tarp over it.

    Yes, it would be a lot of work and it wouldn't be worth it to me just for the cost savings. I'm also figuring that it would be good exercise and kind of fun to do.

    And of course if I find out I'm in over my head and can't handle it, I know it's easy to give wood away on hearth.com. ;)
     
  5. G-rott

    G-rott
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    Jan 7, 2006
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    [quote author="heydan" date="1160240740"
    "I also have enough seasoned wood for this winter so I'm not in a hurry. "

    Good!

    "I assume that uncut logs can sit on the ground for a year or more with no serious ill effects?"

    Wrong, they will pick up moisture and rot.

    "Yes, it would be a lot of work and it wouldn't be worth it to me just for the cost savings. I'm also figuring that it would be good exercise and kind of fun to do."

    For the exercise, I still wouldn't handle anything larger than 8' logs. Yes it could be enjoyable.
    If I was goung to buy tree length I woud split a load or two with friends and have a saw and split weekend.

    Good luck,

    Garett
     
  6. RoosterBoy

    RoosterBoy
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    Jul 5, 2006
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    i have 12 cords of logs sitting in my back Yard i got 1 load witch ended up being 7 cords i cut and split and stacked in may. that's the load im going to start burning this year i have all ready started the 12 cord pile there may be 14 cords i got seven out of the last load and there is 2 loads there i always under estimate. :)

    but as far as it being a big job with just me and no one helping me at all because my brother is blind. yes it is.

    i bought a canthook to role the logs off the pile and onto a flat ground cut the firewood to 19 inch lengths half way then roll the log over and cut the other side.

    put them in my wheel barrel to the splitter and stacking area and split and pile. :) to make it more enjoyable i needed safety hearing protection so i bought a set that has a am fm tuner and im able to listen to music wile i work some day id like to buy a ipod with fm transmitter that will transmit my songs to my headset. other then that it's not that bad.

    good luck
    Jason
     
  7. Eric Johnson

    Eric Johnson
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    Nov 18, 2005
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    That's a nice looking load of wood. Not too big, so it should be a lot easier to cut and split.

    You don't need anything too fancy to move the logs around, and you will need to do it. A long iron prybar works well. You can buy a peavey or a cant hook. Of the two, I would recommend the cant hook. The peavy has a long spike sticking out the bottom that tends to get in the way when you're trying to roll logs. Peaveys are made for moving floating logs around. I don't know why they still sell them, because nobody floats logs anymore, but they do.

    One good way to cut logs in your yard is to roll them out away from the pile, then make cuts about 3/4 of the way through with your saw. Then roll the log over and finish making the cuts. This keeps your chain out of the dirt.

    Cutting wood in your yard is the way to go if you have a way of disposing of all the sawdust and other crap that results from cutting and splitting. It's quite a pile--more than you might think.

    G-rott is right about logs retaining moisture, and some species will start to rot if not cut and split fairly soon. I would aim to get it all cut, split and stacked before the snow flies, if possible. Then you'll have about 7 full cords of dry wood next season.
     
  8. MALogger

    MALogger
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    Feb 27, 2006
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    Hi Guys,

    The simple solution to the moisture problem is to put a few tree lengths perpendicular to the direction the logs will be piled and pile the rest on top. That wood in the picture looks awful familiar to me, I think I have seen it before. :)

    Craig
     
  9. Roospike

    Roospike
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    Nov 19, 2005
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    Eric brought up some good points. Moving the logs and separating them out will be safer to cut. If cutting in a pile you have a very high chance your chainsaw will "kick back" at you. Keep the upper front tip of your chainsaw bar away from other wood when cutting. Make sure you think ahead when cutting and dont make it a race! Take your time cutting and always think about what your doing. Dont let your self get tired and take a good amount of breaks. Spreading out the logs and cutting most of the way through on the ground is the way to go, as you get better at cutting like this you will be able the cut over 95% of the way through the logs and when you move them they will just finish breaking at the cut. I wouldnt store logs too long on the ground so just take your time as you get them cut up and do a little at a time. Dont for get your P.P.E. personal protective equipment
     
  10. suematteva

    suematteva
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    May 25, 2006
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    Definately put the first two logs like MA logger says..makes moving them around easier and cures the moisture issue...Also makes it easier on the back...There is alot of sawdust...you save on buying mulch for the greenery...Some neighbors might not like the saw...If you can cut when it is cold, their windows are closed....The canthook is great tool where the saw goes that goes.

    When talking to the logger ask if they are clean logs....Sometimes these guys depending on when they are skidding they can look like they went through a mud bog on the way to the truck...You probably dont want to sharpen every few cuts..
     
  11. MALogger

    MALogger
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    I try not to drag my wood through mud bogs, that would be against BMP's! :)

    Craig
     
  12. suematteva

    suematteva
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    May 25, 2006
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    Am sure we could share some stories!!!!
     
  13. MALogger

    MALogger
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    Feb 27, 2006
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    Best Management Practices. Rules pertaining to the harvesting of timber.

    Craig
     
  14. suematteva

    suematteva
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    Then Feathers??
     
  15. heydan

    heydan
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    Jun 16, 2006
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    My gardener told me: "I get my wood from Galasso Tree from Walpole. They deliver a full truck load which usually is 7-8 cords of wood. You could also try Tree Tech from Foxboro. A full truck load is around $350-400. You can't move the logs, you have to climb on top of the pile and work your way down."

    So that's something like $50 per cord for tree length wood delivered. At that price, who would want to go deal with the difficulty and danger of felling trees himself? $50 per cord is close enough to free for me.
     
  16. glassmanjpf

    glassmanjpf
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    Apr 4, 2006
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    Been a member awhile but haven't posted yet, thought I'd write in on this one. I too like the log lengths and when they unload them if the driver can lay them out only three high it's not bad to work at all. Like someone said, work from the top down. Here where I am the tree guys are always looking to get rid of wood since they pay to dump it at the landfill. I never pay a fee, $30 tip for several cords is not uncommon here. I got seven cords of logs in Feb ($50) and cut them to 18 inch rounds and split it all in 4 weekends. Just waiting on the weather now, it's getting close! Good luck, work safe.
     
  17. MALogger

    MALogger
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    The only problem with buying wood from a tree company you get what you get.
    Sure it's a little cheaper but I assure you it won't be a nice load of poles. You can get some pretty large stuff.
    Plus from TT you will get 5 to 6 cords max I know both drivers and that's what they can get on the truck.

    Craig
     
  18. heydan

    heydan
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    Jun 16, 2006
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    That's a great tip about getting the logs stacked three high. Good to know.

    Does a project like this require an extra large chainsaw? Do you think I could do it with a Makita UC4000?
     
  19. glassmanjpf

    glassmanjpf
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    Apr 4, 2006
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    Is that Electric? I wouldn't attempt it. For $150 invest in a 16 or 18 inch gas powered. I bought a 16 inch Poulan at Lowe's with an extra chain and it worked great.
     
  20. heydan

    heydan
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    Jun 16, 2006
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  21. ourhouse

    ourhouse
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    Feb 16, 2006
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    If you'r going to by tree length wood you might want to step up to a gas powered saw. 6 or 7 cord is a lot of wood to cut and you will be able to take the saw any where you want.
     
  22. cogger

    cogger
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    Oct 10, 2006
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    That's the way to go! That wood looks very user freindly.
     
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