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What green thing(s) are you doing to contribute?

Post in 'The Green Room' started by dave_dj1, Mar 30, 2012.

  1. Slow1

    Slow1 Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2008
    Messages:
    2,649
    Loc:
    Eastern MA
    Hard to get link in but this looks like the bulb, although the picture isn't quite the same... Online it is now showing a price about $20/ea, but the ones I picked up were on sale at like 9.95/ea last year. I keep watching for the sales again as they have been working great for me.

    Utilitech 60-Watt Equivalent Indoor Warm White LED Light Bulb

    Item #: 338931 | Model #: LA19/OM800/LED

    Helpful Sponsor Ads!





  2. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,120
    Loc:
    Midwest
    Well, lets see...

    heat with about 95% renewable biofuel
    run car, mow yard, hopefully soon cut wood with 85% renewable biofuel
    wife's car is a Honda Insight @ ~56mpg lifetime mpg
    take every step possible to reduce use of oil obtained from foreign dictators / terrorists and/or injecting toxic chemicals into the ground water / aka 'fracking'
    catch / recycle as much rainwater as possible
    retrofit high efficiency AC and installed extra TXV for even better efficiency
    maintain / upkeep on old growth shade trees around house to minimize solar gain in the summer / maximize in winter
    install LED / fluorescent lights where possible
    set up 'smart home' system to control lights as needed
    Reduce/Reuse/Recycling, etc
  3. jimbom

    jimbom Combustion Analyzer

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2010
    Messages:
    1,022
    Loc:
    Missouri Ozarks
    I have to re-roof and am going with metal. Here in the Ozarks we get about 50 inches of precip/year. My question: what is the oak, hickory, and cedar forest pollen impact on captured rainwater storage? Do you try to use captured rainwater for anything other than non-potable? If so, have you turned up any pathogens in your storage? Thanks, Jim
  4. Jags

    Jags Moderate Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2006
    Messages:
    14,599
    Loc:
    Northern IL
    Jim - I think rain catch is recommended for non-potable only, just for some of the reasons you state. Watering trees and plants with it is not introducing anything new to them. Watering humans - another story. MMMmmm...tree pollen...yummy.;sick
    jimbom likes this.
  5. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 20, 2008
    Messages:
    6,378
    Loc:
    S.NH- Mass's smoking section
    I use my catch water for watering garden, adding to the compost pile, changing water in my fish tank, various pottery uses (making glazes, throwing water, rinsing hands), and a bunch of other stuff I'm sure. I know a guy that is off the grid- he drinks his and has never had an issue. The first portion likely contains all the pollen- need to do fractionation.
    jimbom likes this.
  6. begreen

    begreen Mooderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    45,842
    Loc:
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Thanks. I'll watch for it on sale:
    http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay?partNumber=338931-75774-LA19/OM800/LED
  7. Corey

    Corey Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2005
    Messages:
    2,120
    Loc:
    Midwest
    We do non-potable only...generally watering plants, herbs, garden, etc around the house. Basically, it's pond-quality water...has pollen, dust, the occasional bug, asphalt roof granules, what ever pollution it picked up falling through the sky, etc. Nothing you'd ever consider drinking without some purification.

    Though if a person took the time to catch it in a sanitary manner and do some mild purification (UV, ozone?) I suspect it could be as good or better than water coming out of the ground or from a lake/river - where it can pick up anything from asbestos, arsenic, pesticides/herbicides, other pathogens to toxic chemicals from fracking, and who knows what else!
    jimbom likes this.
  8. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    May 20, 2008
    Messages:
    6,378
    Loc:
    S.NH- Mass's smoking section
    I think the metal roof helps here as it washes off quick compared to a rough surface, but you're right- there's probably an easy treatment
    jimbom likes this.
  9. Wood Duck

    Wood Duck Minister of Fire

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2009
    Messages:
    4,036
    Loc:
    Central PA
    If you want to use rainwater for potable supply I'd look for a device that diverts the first flush of runoff from each storm away from storage (I think you can find some online) and you will need disinfection. Rainwater has dust, pollen, nutrients, etc. that will allow bacteria to grow in the water while the water is stored. The primary negative impact of pollen is that it provides potential food for bacteria, potentially including pathogens. Pollen probably also adds taste to the water. Keep the storage container as clean as possible and disinfect continuously. I'd use ozone disinfection which leaves no residual besides oxygen. I think small ozone generators are not very expensive. I can't recommend a manufacturer.
    jimbom likes this.
  10. Sisu

    Sisu Feeling the Heat

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2009
    Messages:
    466
    Loc:
    Ontario
    Rain water from the roof should be treated like any surface water via chemically assisted filtration.

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