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Winter-proof Wheelbarrow

Post in 'The Gear' started by dumbodog00, Jan 15, 2011.

  1. dumbodog00

    dumbodog00 New Member

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    Does anyone have a recommendation for a wheelbarrow that will make it through winter without breaking? It would need to be able to sit outside all the time, because it is frequently used all year long. Plastic would be preferable, but not required. Also, one of decent size would be nice. Finally, it needs to be fairly easy on the wallet. Thanks!

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  2. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

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    I used to tear up a wheelbarrow every year until I broke down and stopped buying homeowner models. Go for a contractor sized wheelbarrow and you will get better quality. Right around $100 is where they start at. I don't go for plastic, so I don't know how well it would stand up to heavy rounds hitting it. I prefer one wheel over 2 also. When I bought my current wheel barrow the retailer didn't want to sell it to me because it was dirty. :lol: If they could see it now sitting outside with a bunch of concrete blocks in it and the bottom dented up. But it was on clearance. :lol:

    Matt
  3. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Why would you prefer plastic and then have to worry about its durability? Steel is durable. Mine are decades old.
  4. Thistle

    Thistle Minister of Fire

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    I'd go with 6 cubic foot contractors wheelbarrow with steel tub.Sure they will get surface rust eventually,once the paint or worn or scratched & if you keep them outside.But turning them over so wheel is up will prevent any rain or snow collecting inside the tub. They're to be used anyway,not taken to a car show IMO.Plus the plastic is worthless in cold weather,over several years they get very brittle from the combination of cold temps & exposure to ultraviolet rays from sunshine all year.And you dont want to drop any pieces of hot steel or coals in them either,it'll melt a hole right through it.
  5. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

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    I bought one of the 7.5 cut ft 2 wheeled Rubbermaid carts and am very happy with it. Deals with the snow well and their claim of 300 lb capacity appears justified.
  6. HeatsTwice

    HeatsTwice Minister of Fire

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    These things last 40 years each (at least) - no joke.

    http://www.plumbersurplus.com/Prod/...-Steel-Contractor-Wheelbarrow/201392/Cat/1687

    I have 7 of them but I put on punchure proof wheels. You often find them for sale at garage sales/craigs list/want adds for about $20. New, of course they are more pricy. But as soon as I see a used one for cheap, I buy it. They are like Stihl saws, they never wear out. But most people don't know it.

    I am tough on them and use them for everything: gravel, cement, firewood, boyscout eagle projects where kids like to have demolition durbies with them, and have done so for 30 years with ones I bought used.

    See red circle of to the left. I bought that one in 1986 used.

    Attached Files:

  7. bboulier

    bboulier Feeling the Heat

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    I second those (like Thistle) who recommend a 6 cu ft. contractor's grade wheelbarrow with a steel tub. We have a light plastic one that my wife uses for her gardening needs, but I find the bigger steel one much more efficient for shifting wood, mulch, fertilizer, etc.. I have had it for years and it is still in great shape.
  8. mayhem

    mayhem Minister of Fire

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    Yep, ditch the $60 homeowner grade barrows that you have to replace every other year and go with the 100 contractor grade unit and keep it for decades. I have one of each, the homeowner barrow is more often now used as an equipment cover than a wheelbarrow, the contractor grade on is used for work...it doesn't flex under even the heaviest loads that I can actually move...or have any business trying.
  9. Shari

    Shari Minister of Fire

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  10. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

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    That looks like a tough little sled Shari. With the runner kit, it looks it would put up with the concrete in the garage with a full load of wood on it.
  11. Shari

    Shari Minister of Fire

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    We don't have the runner kit but then again we don't stack wood in our garage. We do have to drag the sled across our cement driveway to get to the front door stacking area though. I've been known to just leave a little snow on the drive in that area :) or just drag it through - they are built tough.

    I actually even use this on the grass sometimes in the summertime if I have just a small amount of wood to move instead of hooking up the trailer to the riding lawn mower.

    I can't handle a wheelbarrow - never could - I just say I'm too short. :) I can't lift a wheelbarrow high enough to get good balance. :)
  12. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

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    I highly recommend this one then. While I have several of the contractor's wheel barrows these guys are touting, it is bigger, works much better for firewood and is easy to balance even in the snow. Its also nice that the kids or the dog can't knock it over in the garage when it is full of wood. Yep, been there enough times to not leave one full of wood in the garage any more.

    http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc...splay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053

    The other nice thing about it is you can tow it like a sled instead of pushing it.
  13. oldspark

    oldspark Guest

    Hauling wood in a wheelbarrow sucks compared to a garden cart.
  14. rowerwet

    rowerwet Minister of Fire

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    I move pellet bags not wood but similar weights involved, for the summer storage movement I use one of these
    http://www.amazon.com/Garden-Cart-Medium-Steel-20-25/dp/B0007Z4XTM
    easily can move 120 lbs of pellets, (my 8 yr old was doing it on her own this fall).
    as a kid I moved all of the wood into our house with a radio flyer wooden country wagon,
    http://www.google.com/products/cata...ult&ct=result&resnum=3&sqi=2&ved=0CDAQ8wIwAg#
    I could move almost as much wood in it as my dad could with his wheel barrow. my BIL uses one like this for filling his OWB
    http://www.google.com/products/cata...og_result&ct=result&resnum=5&ved=0CDoQ8wIwBA#
    when there is snow I move my pellets to the OPB with a wooden toboggan like this one,
    http://www.amazon.com/Flexible-Flyer-Classic-Wooden-Toboggan/dp/B00009936A
    not sure how well it would work for wood
  15. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    I have a $100 steel tub model that I got about 8 yrs ago. Bought a new tire today, but I plan on having it another 10 years. I tip it up/lean it against a shed when not in use, grease the axle once a year or so.
  16. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

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    Sheri,

    Add wood to the bottom of the handles. If you add 2 inches, it would be just like you grew 2 inches. Add a 2x4, it's like you grew 3 1/2.


    Matt
  17. Thistle

    Thistle Minister of Fire

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    Yup. Mine's a little over 20 yrs old now,originally bought it when I started doing some various landscaping,building limestone & granite garden benches/pedestals for sale.Pretty beat up,tire's been replaced at least once.Really need to have it filled with foam or whatever it is so its more durable with heavy loads.Mostly used for hauling dirt & firewood now,sometimes will be leaning up against the back fence for a month or so in mid summer.
  18. Shari

    Shari Minister of Fire

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    LOL Matt! That would work - but - I didn't want to mention - there is also a balance issue. Yeah, I know there are 2 wheeled wheelbarrows nowadays.... Just thinking about using a wheelbarrow harks me back to my teenage years when I worked with my Dad who was a ditch digger. I lost control of more loads of pea gravel and/or dirt than I care to remember...... :)
  19. EatenByLimestone

    EatenByLimestone Minister of Fire

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    The secret is not to use your arms. Pick it up by shrugging your shoulders. Arms tire out too easily.

    Matt
  20. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    LOL
    No, the secret is to say "I’m too short" and let someone else shrug their shoulders. Sounds like it's working out just fine.
  21. Shari

    Shari Minister of Fire

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    You got it! :)
  22. gpcollen1

    gpcollen1 Minister of Fire

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    I second a steel contractors wheel barrow. Forget the plastic in the winter where it will crack easily...and forget the 2 wheel models unless you don't have any physical abilities...forget just thinking $$ if you want it to actually hold up for years...

    I found a steel tub wheel barrow with a broken handle. New handle kit and a new tube in the tire and I had a wheel barrow for $32 - that was 8 years ago.
  23. SolarAndWood

    SolarAndWood Minister of Fire

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    Wish you had posted this a few weeks ago. Everyone thinks I'm a moron with no physical abilities now. :coolsmirk:
  24. Adios Pantalones

    Adios Pantalones Minister of Fire

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    Well think about it- if it lasts 30 years, and you buy it at 40- there's a few years there where you'll wish it was easier
  25. Thistle

    Thistle Minister of Fire

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    :lol: totally. Glad I was in early 20's when I bought mine,it should just last about until I retire in 12-15 yrs...

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