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Working on Husqvarna 55 Rancher - need help

Post in 'The Gear' started by bsa0021, Sep 17, 2009.

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  1. bsa0021

    bsa0021 Feeling the Heat

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    I want to remove the bar oiler cover but first I need to remove the sprocket. I would guess I need to remove the nut/clutch mechanism but how do I keep the crank from turning?
    Thanks!

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  2. kenskip1

    kenskip1 Member

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    I just did my 55 last week. All you need is a punch and a hammer.But before you hit this just remember that the clutch is a left hand thread.Put your punch on the solid part of the clutch. I turned the engine until compression is felt and give her a good solid wrap. Should come off! Ken
  3. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    You may need to keep the crank from turning, easiest way is to block the piston. Remove the spark plug and put something SOFT in the hole - my local OPE guy likes to use a loop of the starter rope, says it works good and it's always handy... Don't use anything that would be hard and likely to damage the piston. They make special piston stops but I don't see any reason to spend the money when rope is free...

    Gooserider
  4. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    When stuffing rope in the cylinder, make sure the piston is up past the ports or else the rope could go into a port and get jammed and sheared in it.
  5. bsa0021

    bsa0021 Feeling the Heat

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    You guys sure about this? I tried the rope deal and put a socket on the nut and I'm afraid I'll break something if I put any more pressure on it. Tried the punch trick too but no luck.
  6. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa Minister of Fire

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    Which direction are you trying to turn it?
  7. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    You are better off using an impact as opposed to just torque... Also remember that it's a LEFT HAND THREAD so you need to turn it clockwise to break it loose :exclaim: The reason for the left hand thread is so that the engine running is always trying to tighten it, which means that the nut will ALWAYS be very tight and tough to break loose. If it's been on there for a while it can take an amazing amount of torque to break it loose and get that first fraction of a turn. Often times you will do better to use an impact wrench if you have one, or alternatively, put a wrench on the nut and hit it a really good whack with a BFH (Big F..ine Hammer)(pretend it's a Harley instead of a Husky... :coolsmirk: ) It is also somewhat safer to do it that way, this is one of those nuts that is really tight until it breaks loose and when it does you launch yourself across the room...

    Once it breaks loose you probably won't even need the wrench as it will be just finger tight - it's the first degree or two of turn that is the killer.

    Gooserider
  8. bsa0021

    bsa0021 Feeling the Heat

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    I'm going clockwise facing the clutch. When you say impact do you mean air impact or physical impact?
  9. BJ64

    BJ64 Minister of Fire

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    I will guess that Goose was speaking of an impact wrench. In any case ti will take quite a bit of force to break it loose.

    You can do it and the next time it will seem like no big deal. Give it a good try!
  10. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    That sounds right - the key is that it's backwards from the direction you would normally turn a fastener...

    As to impact, I was thinking an air impact wrench like a shop uses to change tires, but a hand impact driver would likely also do the trick (might have to hit it a few times w/ a really big hammer) Or just put a wrench on it and hit the wrench. The key is the idea of applying a sudden shock and turn force to the nut as opposed to just pure twisting force. It can be kind of scary the first time you do it because it does kind of feel like you are trying to break the fastener by applying far more torque than you would think a bolt that size can stand (indeed when it lets go, it feels very much like when you snap a bolt in that resistance goes from immense to near zero) but the impact method does work.

    Gooserider
  11. Nonprophet

    Nonprophet Minister of Fire

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    A good friend of mine who's a transmission rebuilder taught me a great trick a few years back. When you're trying to get a nut or bolt loose that really tight, get a breaker bar on it and TIGHTEN it a little first. You'll hear it "pop" a little--now loosen it and you're good to go!

    It seems counter-intuitive, but it works great! I work around heavy machinery from time to time and I've told a few people this trick who said "yeah, right!" But then when they just couldn't bust it free they tried it--and it worked every time.......!!


    NP
  12. bsa0021

    bsa0021 Feeling the Heat

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    My air impact worked like a charm. Two blips and it came off. I don't normally use air for small fasteners like this but it worked out.
    Thanks!
    Now I can clean the oiler and see why it leaks excessively.
  13. Gooserider

    Gooserider Mod Emeritus

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    Great... See what we meant about it being a bear to break loose initially, but once started it unscrews easily? Note that you don't need to get it as tight going back on - just get it reasonably snug, and the engine torque will finish the job as you use the saw.

    Gooserider
  14. bsa0021

    bsa0021 Feeling the Heat

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    Thanks for the good advice. Impact was the way to go.
    Once again hearth.com and its people came thru. :)
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