Adapt a chimney brush to sooteater rods

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Jags

Moderate Moderator
Staff member
Aug 2, 2006
18,283
Northern IL
Thought I would post a quick and easy adapter to convert from the threaded end of a chimney brush to the push lock (or whatever its called) connectors of the sooteater rods.
I like the sooteater (and rods) but on occasion like to run a poly brush in my stack as well. I didn’t really care to have another set of rods around for the screw connection of the brush so I came up with a super simple adapter. It does require a 1/4” drilled hole and about 10 seconds of welding (come on, if you don’t have a welder you NEED one or if not, phone a friend.)
It is two components that I had on the shelf, but could be had at a hardware store for about a buck.
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The two pieces I used was a plumbing fitting that would screw onto the brush threads and then a collar that was a nice snug fit to the sooteater rods - then welded together. Next - drill the hole that coincides with the push lock/release of the rods.
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They should fit together just as the original couplers of the sooteater rods.
I am not sure how many folks find a use for both the sooteater and brush head, but if you do, this is a quick way to make one set of rods fit both units. I find that it works very well.

Note: I tightened the living daylights out of the brush head to pipe fitting so that if reverse was ever used, it isn’t coming apart at that joint. 423B15DF-A3B2-4BEC-B84B-25103985A916.jpeg
 
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xman23

Minister of Fire
Oct 7, 2008
2,349
Lackawaxen PA
I haven't used a soot eater, so I'm not familiar with those rods. They look lighter than my standard rods. I always was always worried about getting the brush disconnected in the chimney.
 

Jags

Moderate Moderator
Staff member
Aug 2, 2006
18,283
Northern IL
The sooteater rods have a locking pin that eliminates the possibility of the rods unscrewing. I prefer them over the standard threaded rods.
 
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blades

Minister of Fire
Nov 23, 2008
3,679
WI, Leroy
I had a set of rods come apart in the flue above a 45 deg doublejoint ( offset) , I had to melt them out and then replace the baffle boards

020.JPG 021.JPG
 

Jags

Moderate Moderator
Staff member
Aug 2, 2006
18,283
Northern IL
Most brands of rods for a typical brush are simply right hand threads to connect. A simple bump of an electric drill in reverse will have them unthreaded before you can say “dang it”. The soot eater rods have a positive pin lock that wont allow separation until they are manually depressed.
 
You could drill and tap for a set screw on each rod..
 

Jags

Moderate Moderator
Staff member
Aug 2, 2006
18,283
Northern IL

Grizzerbear

Minister of Fire
Feb 12, 2019
1,167
SW Missoura
Cool. I've actually thought about doing this before. I like the soot eater as well and use it still but a regular poly brush still seems to get it cleaner imo.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,088
central pa
Cool. I've actually thought about doing this before. I like the soot eater as well and use it still but a regular poly brush still seems to get it cleaner imo.
Brushes absolutely do not clean better than rotary.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,088
central pa
Sure seems like it to me. I'll keep using it.
Thats fine if it's what you prefer. But I clean lots of chimneys and have found without question rotary does a better job faster and easier than brushes. If it's just fine dry powder it really doesn't matter. But if there is any crusty stuff or glaze rotary is far better.
 
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Grizzerbear

Minister of Fire
Feb 12, 2019
1,167
SW Missoura
Thats fine if it's what you prefer. But I clean lots of chimneys and have found without question rotary does a better job faster and easier than brushes. If it's just fine dry powder it really doesn't matter. But if there is any crusty stuff or glaze rotary is far better.

I hear ya. It is faster and easier not having to take the connector off and just run up through the stove with the soot eater. Most of the time this is what I do. I haven't had any glaze in years....before I ever had a soot eater....so I can't say but It just always seems like the brush gets more of the fine dry powder off. The difference is pretty minimal so like you said it's not really that big of a deal I guess. Just my OCD.
 
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Jags

Moderate Moderator
Staff member
Aug 2, 2006
18,283
Northern IL
For clarification ...I spin my brush with a drill. I usually run the sooteater first and then follow up with a brush . Squeaky clean.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,088
central pa
For clarification ...I spin my brush with a drill. I usually run the sooteater first and then follow up with a brush . Squeaky clean.
I have softer bristle brushes I spin with my rods. I usually use them in air cooled chimneys for prefab fireplaces. Brush the chimney then spin it in the cap. I just don't really trust them to stay together if I spin the whole way.
 
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