alarm

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,691
South Puget Sound, WA
Auber makes one system. There are several threads here on this topic.
 
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RandyBoBandy

Minister of Fire
Feb 25, 2015
896
Whitmore lake
Auber Instruments AT200
 

RandyBoBandy

Minister of Fire
Feb 25, 2015
896
Whitmore lake

Potatoe

New Member
Nov 22, 2018
9
Nova Scotia
I’m not sure on batteries as I have mine hooked up with an ac adapter. Any thermocouple is compatible. Wires are just quick connect into the module. No plug needed.
 

RandyBoBandy

Minister of Fire
Feb 25, 2015
896
Whitmore lake
I’m not sure on batteries as I have mine hooked up with an ac adapter. Any thermocouple is compatible. Wires are just quick connect into the module. No plug needed.
Nice. Can you set more than one alarm? Do you feel it is a quality device? 200 clams is a little spendy
 

Potatoe

New Member
Nov 22, 2018
9
Nova Scotia
I personally think it’s great. It’s not a really big display in person but fine if fairly close. I have high alarms set for stovetop and flue. It’s certainly not cheap.. but piece of mind is nice to have without running down the stairs all the time or if not home.
 

velvetfoot

Minister of Fire
Dec 5, 2005
9,973
Sand Lake, NY
I personally think it’s great. It’s not a really big display in person but fine if fairly close. I have high alarms set for stovetop and flue. It’s certainly not cheap.. but piece of mind is nice to have without running down the stairs all the time or if not home.
It's interesting that except for the beginning of the burn, the stove top temp exceeds the flue temp. Interesting to me, anyway, I guess I should've known.
 

RandyBoBandy

Minister of Fire
Feb 25, 2015
896
Whitmore lake

RandyBoBandy

Minister of Fire
Feb 25, 2015
896
Whitmore lake
My reply was to the OP. Didn't notice this was a resurrected thread.
Ohh. Than I apologize for my somewhat chity response.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,691
South Puget Sound, WA
It's interesting that except for the beginning of the burn, the stove top temp exceeds the flue temp. Interesting to me, anyway, I guess I should've known.
Yes, it's a good illustration of how the stove works and why I only go by probe flue temp (and not stove top) for timing of the air control closure. I do close down the air sooner though. Usually I have the air closed around 50% by a 400F flue temp.
 

velvetfoot

Minister of Fire
Dec 5, 2005
9,973
Sand Lake, NY
Yes, it's a good illustration of how the stove works and why I only go by probe flue temp (and not stove top) for timing of the air control closure. I do close down the air sooner though. Usually I have the air closed around 50% by a 400F flue temp.
On the other hand, for the large majority of the burn, when he's cruising at flue probe temp of X, stove stop will be X+100. Stove top temp is an important parameter.

It seems that closing air early is an attempted workaround in many cases to compensate for an excessive, (except maybe to pass an epa test with specific assumptions and conditions), minimum design draft. It's too bad. I imagine closing air early leads to more pollution as well. All the stove in this example are tube stoves.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,691
South Puget Sound, WA
On the other hand, for the large majority of the burn, when he's cruising at flue probe temp of X, stove stop will be X+100. Stove top temp is an important parameter.

It seems that closing air early is an attempted workaround in many cases to compensate for an excessive, (except maybe to pass an epa test with specific assumptions and conditions), minimum design draft. It's too bad. I imagine closing air early leads to more pollution as well. All the stove in this example are tube stoves.
Not so, it's not a workaround, it's running the stove efficiently. Starting to close down the air around 400 for our stove is done with a visual check that secondary combustion has started. If the air was closed all the way down at that point the fire might start smoldering. One's eyes are the most important instrument here. Usually with dry softwood I am turning down the air fully within the next 5-10 minutes. Burning hardwood means letting it go a little hotter and longer, but not a lot. After 10 yrs of operation I know our stove well. Looking at the stove top temp is unnecessary. As long as I keep the flue temp under 600F it's not overfiring or overheating. I know that the stove top will be about 100-150º over the flue temp.

Our stove is almost boringly predictable in this way. I'm even toying with the idea of automating the air control for this reason.
 

velvetfoot

Minister of Fire
Dec 5, 2005
9,973
Sand Lake, NY
I've seen you suggest the very thing for people reporting out of control secondaries. Of course, visual is key, who's got the eyes on the chimney top, lol.
 

RandyBoBandy

Minister of Fire
Feb 25, 2015
896
Whitmore lake
Not so, it's not a workaround, it's running the stove efficiently. Starting to close down the air around 400 for our stove is done with a visual check that secondary combustion has started. If the air was closed all the way down at that point the fire might start smoldering. One's eyes are the most important instrument here. Usually with dry softwood I am turning down the air fully within the next 5-10 minutes. Burning hardwood means letting it go a little hotter and longer, but not a lot. After 10 yrs of operation I know our stove well. Looking at the stove top temp is unnecessary. As long as I keep the flue temp under 600F it's not overfiring or overheating. I know that the stove top will be about 100-150º over the flue temp.

Our stove is almost boringly predictable in this way. I'm even toying with the idea of automating the air control for this reason.
If you are looking for some excitement and unpredictable burns I have an encore for ya
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,691
South Puget Sound, WA
If you are looking for some excitement and unpredictable burns I have an encore for ya
LOL I considered that 10 yrs ago. Fortunately the thought was a brief one. Many years back we had the original Resolute which was a fine stove. Then a friend came to me with some very sad stories about her Acclaim... 'nuf said.
 

RandyBoBandy

Minister of Fire
Feb 25, 2015
896
Whitmore lake
LOL I considered that 10 yrs ago. Fortunately the thought was a brief one. Many years back we had the original Resolute which was a fine stove. Then a friend came to me with some very sad stories about her Acclaim... 'nuf said.
I wish I would had found this forum before I bought two of them. I was won over by their beauty. At least I only spent an initial 800 on the encore and the folks footed the bill for the cabin defiant. There needs to be a test drive or lease option on stoves like there is for cars. I would like to try a non cat stove like the T4 or the enviro Boston.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
78,691
South Puget Sound, WA
I wish I would had found this forum before I bought two of them. I was won over by their beauty. At least I only spent an initial 800 on the encore and the folks footed the bill for the cabin defiant. There needs to be a test drive or lease option on stoves like there is for cars. I would like to try a non cat stove like the T4 or the enviro Boston.
They might not be appropriate for a cold cabin where you want excess radiant heat quickly. Sometimes one needs to compromise between looks and needs.