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F1x3rUpp3r

New Member
Oct 25, 2021
4
Washington
Hi all,

First time posting.

I recently bought a used Alderlea T4 (09 -14 model) but was unaware of how bad of shape the firebox is in... I know I can get replacement parts for the baffle, brick rails, flame shield, etc. The exterior is cast iron and looks good, no cracks, warping or dents, but does have some surface rust.

My main problems are the non-replaceable parts: 1) the air riser tube in the back of the firebox has a large hole; 2) the rear brick tabs are just completely missing and the right side is warped; 3) the air wash chamber has cracks on the left and right corners where is connects to the front of the fire box.

Attached are pictures of the 3 problem areas. I have removed heavily damaged baffle, brick rails, fire bricks, and some of the baffle pin.

Here are my ideas:
1) Cut out the rust/hole to make it square and then weld either C-channel or rectangle tubing
2) Cut and bend back what I can, then weld new tabs
3) Weld it back to the corners

Should I even go about making these repairs? Do I need to fix all of these problems to have an efficient and safe stove? Will it still work fine without the air riser in the back?

Any and all help is appreciated.

PXL_20211025_063404883.jpg PXL_20211025_063420550.jpg PXL_20211025_063424587.jpg PXL_20211025_063436423.jpg PXL_20211025_063440982.jpg PXL_20211025_063444076.jpg PXL_20211025_063553928.jpg
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
1,706
SE North Carolina
My thoughts. The secondary air tube that’s burned through in the back seems like the hardest to fix and the most important. You are looking at significant time and the new baffle isn’t cheap. How much solid metal is left to weld to in the important locations. It didn’t get this way without serious blatant neglect. Adding brackets for bricks and just ignoring #3. Replacing all the gaskets. Talking 4-500$ and that’s probably too low. I’m have a welder (120$ harbor freight) on be welded some but the fabrication required to make this stove function as intended are probably beyond my skills(not that I couldn’t learn but it will take doing wrong twice).

First thoughts are cut your losses and move on. Could keep it as a long term project, or repurpose it and sell or keep it.
Just my thoughts

Evan
 

F1x3rUpp3r

New Member
Oct 25, 2021
4
Washington
Yeah, this stove was ignored, I'm actually upset about the person I bought it from seemed nice, but obviously knew the thing was toast. There were only the back corners of the side brick rails left (the rest was missing/melted away).

I honestly don't know if I can even get close enough to weld the air tube.

Is there any reason I shouldn't weld? Like will the weld more likely crack when the stove is heat cycled? Would a repair like this stop me from passing inspection?

I think I'll take the whole unit apart per the manual, then figure out what parts I can buy/make. Worse case I could just pass it on, but tell the buyer what they are getting into.
 

EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
1,706
SE North Carolina
Yeah, this stove was ignored, I'm actually upset about the person I bought it from seemed nice, but obviously knew the thing was toast. There were only the back corners of the side brick rails left (the rest was missing/melted away).

I honestly don't know if I can even get close enough to weld the air tube.

Is there any reason I shouldn't weld? Like will the weld more likely crack when the stove is heat cycled? Would a repair like this stop me from passing inspection?

I think I'll take the whole unit apart per the manual, then figure out what parts I can buy/make. Worse case I could just pass it on, but tell the buyer what they are getting into.
The question I had is what are you welding too. Clean it out good wire wheel/grind it all down. Then see what’s left. You could fab new air Chanel easy enough but what’s left to weld it to.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,820
central pa
Honestly I would be worried about what condition the rest of the metal in that stove is in. It was clearly severely overfired consistently. To me it would be scrap metal.
 

F1x3rUpp3r

New Member
Oct 25, 2021
4
Washington
EbS-P: So I cleaned around the air tube and took some more pics. I would cut the warped stuff off then weld the on the sides, top and bottom (see red lines).

bholler: So the rest is fine, the damage was contained to the back of the firebox (air tube and rear brick rails). The baffle and the flame shield protected the top of the firebox. Ill clean it up a bit more and post some pics. I would hate to scrap it but that might be the best option.

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F1x3rUpp3r

New Member
Oct 25, 2021
4
Washington
Here are some more photos.

Whats left of the side brick rails and baffle. Then just the unit as a whole (the white on top is just ash from my hands). I am also trying to figure out if they (the seller) repainted it, and if so, if they used the correct paint and not just reg black paint...

I am trying to get ahold of some local dealers for more input but it seems most of them are closed on Mondays.

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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
91,299
South Puget Sound, WA
That would be a serious project to restore. I have never seen a more abused Alderlea. The outside looks good because it is a shell surrounding the inner steel stove. Cutting out the old secondary tube will be a real pita. The new tube would need to be welded from the bottom and through the flue collar. And that is only if there is good metal on the back baffle shelf to weld to.
 

moresnow

Minister of Fire
Jan 13, 2015
1,913
Iowa
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,820
central pa
Here are some more photos.

Whats left of the side brick rails and baffle. Then just the unit as a whole (the white on top is just ash from my hands). I am also trying to figure out if they (the seller) repainted it, and if so, if they used the correct paint and not just reg black paint...

I am trying to get ahold of some local dealers for more input but it seems most of them are closed on Mondays.

View attachment 283996 View attachment 283997 View attachment 283998 View attachment 283999
The first think you need to do is strip off the cast shell and inspect the actual stove body for and damage or metal fatigue.

Then if you do decide to fix it. I would cut the top off to do the repairs
 

EatenByLimestone

Minister of Fire
Part it out. The door is upgraded. The cast iron can help other stoves with damaged bits.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
91,299
South Puget Sound, WA
Then if you do decide to fix it. I would cut the top off to do the repairs
That would ruin the enameling. It's only saving grace at this point.
 
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bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,820
central pa
That would ruin the enameling. It's only saving grace at this point.
Will it? I have never worked on one I assumed the cast panels were just bolted on
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
91,299
South Puget Sound, WA
Will it? I have never worked on one I assumed the cast panels were just bolted on
The sides yes, I'm not sure about the front, so I just looked at our stove and I think you are right. They float around the steel innards.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
26,820
central pa
The sides yes, I'm not sure about the front, so I just looked at our stove and I think you are right. They float around the steel innards.
I assumed that but wasn't sure