Another wood ID

CincyBurner

Minister of Fire
Mar 10, 2015
547
SW Ohio
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Simonkenton

Minister of Fire
Feb 27, 2014
1,846
Marshall NC
The wood looks like black walnut but the bark does not look like black walnut.
It isn't locust.

Mystery tree.
 

CincyBurner

Minister of Fire
Mar 10, 2015
547
SW Ohio
I’m assuming the right is willow and bottom is elm, if so

Far LEFT - OP's pic post #22 | MIDDLE pic - Virginia Tech stock pic of black willow bud (yellow twig) | RIGHT pic - Virginia Tech stock pic of Siberian elm bud
 

rwhite

Minister of Fire
Nov 8, 2011
1,782
North Central Idaho
Appears to be Russian Olive. Makes you feel like a giant splitting it. Fast growers, burns okay. I burned a lot when I lived in S. ID. Smells like cigars
 

hickoryhoarder

Minister of Fire
Apr 5, 2013
539
Indiana
My guess is elm (Siberian ?). Close-up pic of twigs with buds ?
The buds from OP's pic #1 (bottom right) looks like elm buds.
What does fresh split smell like ?
The buds also made me think Siberian elm. I was thinking locust on the bark.
 

qwee

Member
Jan 17, 2013
77
I'm in your general area - Russian olive and red elm are very common in this low rain mountain desert climate. It isn't Russian Olive because Russian Olive has 'flaky' bark and a more tannish chocolate colored wood color.

So I'm going with Red Elm. If you split some, the fibers kind of want to hold together - but Red elm is suppose to be easier to split than the other sub species of elm, and it has a little higher btu rating, too. Also, you can see a slight reddish/violet hue in the brown part of the split wood. And, the tree usually has several branching parts in its growth - so the main trunk will go up 6 to 8 feet and then there will be 3 or 4 medium sized trunks coming off this main trunk.

A dead ringer - if the bark is removed and the exposed wood has little pointy nipples sticking out here and there - it is for sure red elm. I think it is in the area of 19-21 btu rating - so like walnut or cherry.
 
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MMH

Member
Jan 21, 2019
223
NV
Thanks to cincyburner I believe this is elm; and now thanks to qwee I think we got it! After comparing some pics and reading up I think this is likely red elm. Also finding 19-21.6 btu from charts. Looks like a descent score.
 

MMH

Member
Jan 21, 2019
223
NV
I'm in your general area - Russian olive and red elm are very common in this low rain mountain desert climate. It isn't Russian Olive because Russian Olive has 'flaky' bark and a more tannish chocolate colored wood color.

So I'm going with Red Elm. If you split some, the fibers kind of want to hold together - but Red elm is suppose to be easier to split than the other sub species of elm, and it has a little higher btu rating, too. Also, you can see a slight reddish/violet hue in the brown part of the split wood. And, the tree usually has several branching parts in its growth - so the main trunk will go up 6 to 8 feet and then there will be 3 or 4 medium sized trunks coming off this main trunk.

A dead ringer - if the bark is removed and the exposed wood has little pointy nipples sticking out here and there - it is for sure red elm. I think it is in the area of 19-21 btu rating - so like walnut or cherry.
I’m familiar with Russian olive although I haven’t burned it. This is definitely not olive. I think your right I think it’s red elm. Thanks for the help.
 
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