Ashes in the garden

coaly

Fisher Moderator
Staff member
Dec 22, 2007
3,814
NE PA
Thanks for the tips. I simply plant lots since they are so cheap and have tons of semi grown at season end. I see by doing the right thing I'll have real onions.
 

DBoon

Minister of Fire
Jan 14, 2009
1,175
Central NY
32" x 28' - a nice big garden.
Well, the actual garden size is 28' x 70' - about 2000 square feet. Each dug and improved trench is 32" x 28'.
 

Brenda66

New Member
Apr 1, 2020
2
West Hartford
My late neighbor who had a wood stove (split wood into his 90s, passed away at age 98) always had the greatest vegetable gardens. He used to spread ashes from the wood stove into the garden soil. I wonder if anyone else does that and is it effective? I have a small pile that I may spread into the garden before planting anything - which be this weekend.
Ashes do make for enrichment in the soil. If you use them you should see healthy plants.
 

semipro

Minister of Fire
Jan 12, 2009
3,812
SW Virginia
Heavy metals were phased out a while ago. Now there are only a few metals used like iron oxide for some reds.
The minimal quantity of anything harmful in the ash from using newpaper to start a fire seems to be almost nil.

I remain cautious. Much printing now is done overseas where standards are not as strict as they are in the U.S.
And, although the concentrations may be low their effect may still be significant given their toxicity.
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
82,717
South Puget Sound, WA
I remain cautious. Much printing now is done overseas where standards are not as strict as they are in the U.S.
And, although the concentrations may be low their effect may still be significant given their toxicity.
That is reasonable for long term publications, but local newspapers are printed locally. There is too much delay in shipping for time-sensitive newspapers. Still, there is no harm in remaining cautious if concerned. Maybe switch to SuperCedars for fire-starting so that this not an issue.