Atlanta Stove Works 15-36 Manuals

pap-repair Posted By pap-repair, Sep 13, 2015 at 8:23 AM

  1. pap-repair

    pap-repair
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    Sep 13, 2015
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    Hi,

    I recently bought an unused but rusty Atlanta Stove Works 15-36 cook stove. I am refurbishing this stove and am in need of a parts and users manual.

    If you have one for sale, or a copy/scan of one, please reply with costs. I would appreciate it.

    Thank you all for your considerations,
    Peter
    IMG_20150627_141431605_HDR.jpg
     
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  2. begreen

    begreen
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    Nice find. What a shame it was neglected. Restored that stove is worth up to about $2500, though they often sell around $800-1000.
     
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  3. coaly

    coaly
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    If you don't find a manual, which you probably won't, we can help you with operation since all cook stoves use the same principals of operation.
    First, it's a coal stove, missing the clean out cover under oven. It needs a cover there to seal the vacuum of the heat chamber between firebox and chimney. It will have a flapper control somewhere to divert exhaust gasses around oven. This is the oven control that you only open when going good to circulate exhaust around oven. It will get "hot" (250 - 300*) without it being turned on and the oven door can be left open at night for more heat. (not with wood burning since the cooler oven walls will form creosote and gooey tar - the reason for clean out under oven door.) The air intake below grates is the main primary air, any opening into firebox above grates is secondary air to ignite coal gas generated by fresh coal as it heats. (oxygen is used up through coal bed, and adding air above fire ignites the gas creating the blue flames on top adding to heat output, reducing emissions) If burning wood, you want to use more upper air than below grates, since air from below will burn wood far too fast. Under normal coal operation the secondary inlet only needs to be cracked open slightly. Any more allows too much air across the top of fire and up chimney reducing flue temp and reducing draft, slowing the fire. Any air intake AFTER the stove top or oven circulation is dilution air used to cool chimney reducing draft. (The same principal as a barometric damper slowing draft without closing the exhaust area) Tilting of a rear lid was also done to allow indoor air into chimney to slow the fire overnight to ensure a fire in the morning. (with coal) Cooking directly over fire with lids removed with the correct size pans is the fastest cooking, moving of pots and pans to the desired heat is the trick to stove top cooking on any cook stove. If you stove black or paint any cast parts, don't treat the stove top the same way. It should be oiled to "season" like a cast iron pan. You'll want to do research on the type of oil to use and the science of polymerizing of oils for the best coating.
    These basics were well known at the time and not readily found in books.
     
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  4. pap-repair

    pap-repair
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    Sep 13, 2015
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    Thank you for the information regarding this stove. I thought it was coal, based on the grate design.

    Where may I be able to find the clean out cover? If I could 'borrow' one, there is a local foundry that may be able to duplicate it or I could machine one out.

    I may start a new thread when I start reassembling. Most of the cast parts were de-rusted using an electrolysis tank, and then immediately painted using Rustoleum hi-temp paint. I have not done anything with the top yet. Your suggestion of oiling the top is well received.

    Peter
     
  5. coaly

    coaly
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    Probably make the cover from steel plate. It doesn't have to be thick, even sheet metal. Anything to stop the air leak into the chamber under oven. Always keep in mind, the principal is to create a hot inner flue that creates rising gasses. This creates a lower pressure than the atmosphere outside the stove and combustion chamber. This differential pressure of higher pressure pushes into the air intake through the fire feeding it oxygen. Cook stoves have many places to leak the higher pressure air into the large areas between firebox and chimney. Any opening, crack or crevice leaks air in, cooling the chimney flue, reducing draft, and reducing what goes through the firebox. Always start the fire bypassing the oven circulation to get the stove, top and chimney up to temperature before allowing circulation around oven. Modern wood and coal cook stoves (they are still being made) use gasketed doors and seal between all parts or are welded one piece steel plate with no leaks. The best in my opinion circulate around the oven from bottom to top avoiding the cooling around the oven. It's the lower pressure in the flue that allows the incoming air filling the void to rise off the fire, across cooktop and be pushed down along the oven, across bottom and into the vent. The most cooling takes place across the bottom where byproducts of combustion (burning wood) form and become a tacky, gooey substance very hard to remove. You learn real quick to get it hot enough before pulling the oven lever to prevent a big mess.
    You "can" burn wood on coal grates, but it burns very fast and small pieces are needed due to smaller firebox in most cook stoves. Once you try hard coal, unless you have the wood to get rid of, most never go back.
     
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  6. begreen

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  7. pap-repair

    pap-repair
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    I know it has been awhile, 4 busted discs in my lower back has slowed me down.

    I finally finished this stove. I consider this a refurbishment, not a restoration, as I replaced most machine screws with socket head screws. Original screws were rusted tight. The grate shaker/lid lifter is not original, but it seems to work OK.

    Rust and paint removal using electrolysis, phosphoric acid bath. Tractor Supply Milkstone Remover is 52% phosphoric acid and is only $25. Dilute @ least 2:1 or 3:1 to extend life. Naval Jelly is ~ 6-8% acid.

    Painted base, stove (but not top), and warming cabinet using hi-temp paints. Polished, oiled top. Cemented all seams with mortar. This stove is definitely not airtight, but verified all seams around oven were tight.

    All that is left is to fire it, mainly to burn off paint & oil fumes and set the mortar/cement. I'll do that outside with a 6' 'chimney'. I will list this on eBay, and if I don't sell it for my reserve price, I'll keep it. My wife thinks it's cute! Unfortunately, my recreational log cabin is not good enough for this, and I won't have my log home done for another couple of years.

    Here are the pictures!
    Note: It may look like there's rust or brown spots, but it is just the lighting in the garage.



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  8. begreen

    begreen
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    Very nice, thanks for sharing the pictures. Good luck with the eBay sale.
     
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  9. winchandle

    winchandle
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    Apr 5, 2018
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    Hi, I have the same stove and have a manual which I'll xerox and mail to you. You can text me your address to 610-220-2270
     
  10. winchandle

    winchandle
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    Also I need a "front" grate for my Atlanta 15-36. It's called "front" in the manual, but it is on the left hand side of the stove...???
     
  11. pap-repair

    pap-repair
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    Hi winchandle,

    I texted you my address for the copy of the manual for this stove. THANK YOU very much!!!
    I am now listing this on eBay. I was going to keep it, but health and finances are getting in the way.

    Thanks again,
    Peter
     
  12. Monica At stove

    Monica At stove
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    Is the price $800 - $1000 for a restored model? How much for interested but in fairly good condition?
     
  13. pap-repair

    pap-repair
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    I am listing my 'range' (which the owners manual calls it) on eBay auction starting at $1999, buy it now for $2999. If it doesn't sell at auction, either I'll keep it, or relist it later this summer for fixed price of $2500, with offers being considered.

    Others I have seen, which have only been a few, have been around $500 to $1000 for a good condition, not restored or refinished model. The stove I have has not been fired.

    Good luck in your search.
    Peter
     
  14. AndreaSo

    AndreaSo
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    Jul 15, 2018
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    Gorgeous work! @pap-repair what did you use to fill in the gap under the oven? I recently purchased this stove myself and just realized that I am missing that piece as well. I'm assuming it's a clean out of some sort?
     
  15. coaly

    coaly
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    Clean out door to remove creosote and tar, a very sticky substance that forms under oven when used with wood.
    A steel door can be made to seal as good as possible. When starting on coal you need ALL the incoming air going through coal bed to get coal to ignite. Any leak there allows indoor air to rush into chimney cooling it, reducing draft which is what creates a low pressure area in stove and connector pipe allowing higher atmospheric air pressure to push into intake feeding oxygen through coal bed. With wood, this air leak allows cooler indoor air into chimney the same way, cooling the chimney, causing the fire to slow as well as create creosote in chimney. So it needs to be closed as tight as possible during operation of either fuels.
     
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  16. begreen

    begreen
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    This is up to the local market and the whim of the buyer. $2500 is for a restored stove in the right market.
     
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  17. AndreaSo

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    Thanks,
    Thanks! I actually went through and read the entire thread after I posted my comment last night and saw your earlier post stating the same.

    Hopefully my husband can fabricate something to work, as we are intending on using this stove, not just keeping it as a decoration.

    I just found this forum by googling the stove name and this thread popped up. I got the stove yesterday off of craigslist. It's actually in pretty good shape, minus the missing clean out. There is asbestos lining the firebox and ash clean out doors (we think) that we're going to have to handle, but other than that I believe everything is cosmetic.

    I need to explore this forum more- our main issue now is going to be building a non combustible wall to code surrounding the cook stove. We have a concrete floor in our kitchen, which is good, but need to figure out safe placement against our walls (logs) or set into our very large kitchen island.

    Are there any good threads you can point me to with pictures and ideas of what others have done in regards to this? We are familiar with the general rules- just looking for ideas at this point.

    Thanks again!
     
  18. coaly

    coaly
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    You're better off not going against a wall due to the minimum clearance of 12 inches with an approved heat shield, then you have the pipe clearance issue which single wall requires 18 inches and double wall requires 6. It probably has an oval connector on the back which normally uses crushed round single wall pipe. So if your island allows pipe clearance (no back wall behind stove) that is far easier. In the middle of the kitchen they radiate heat in all directions much better for space heating. You also need the flue damper easily accessible in the first section of connector pipe. (if there isn't one built into the stove)
     
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  19. pap-repair

    pap-repair
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    I used a piece of 2" x 1/4" steel flat bar. I believe I curved it length wise (with a hammer) to fit the ends better. I fabricated some hooks that turn to hold it in place, almost like a drawer lock. I didn't take any pictures of this :(. Hope this helps.
     
  20. sccamper

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    winchandle, would it be possible for me to get a copy of the manual also? I wanted to ask before texting you. Thanks
     
  21. sccamper

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    AndreaSo, we have this range also and have the clean out door. I would be happy to get some pictures and dimensions to help with fabricating a new one if you would like.
     
  22. sccamper

    sccamper
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    pap-repair, love the way your range turned out. What brand paint did you use and is it a flat or satin finish? I dont care for the chaulky looking flat stove paint and Im afraid a satin finish will be too glossy. Thanks
     
  23. coaly

    coaly
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    Satin Black by Stove Bright isn't too glossy and isn't quite flat. Good combination and a very good paint that holds its color. Very close to hand rubbed stove black.

    Paint Burn Off NJ Mama Bear 3.JPG
     
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  24. begreen

    begreen
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    Yes, Stove Bright's Satin Black is what I have used also, except on a cast iron stove repaint where I used their metallic black.

    IMAG0019web.jpg
     
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  25. sccamper

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    Thank you so much coaly and begreen. That is exactly what I was looking for, the pictures sealed the deal.
     

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