Bees in the ongoing stack

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EPS

Burning Hunk
Jun 5, 2015
163
NH
While splitting and stacking some maple just now I spotted a lot more bees coming and going from the stacks than ever before. The wood is close by to a garden, bit it seemed like they are nesting somewhere in the pile.

If this was a completed stack of wood I'd just leave them BEE, but I dont want to rile them up each time I add wood to it, or split the wood next to the stack.

Any suggestions on a spray that I can use to get rid of them that won't contaminate the firewood?
 

stoveliker

Minister of Fire
Nov 17, 2019
1,608
Long Island NY
While splitting and stacking some maple just now I spotted a lot more bees coming and going from the stacks than ever before. The wood is close by to a garden, bit it seemed like they are nesting somewhere in the pile.

If this was a completed stack of wood I'd just leave them BEE, but I dont want to rile them up each time I add wood to it, or split the wood next to the stack.

Any suggestions on a spray that I can use to get rid of them that won't contaminate the firewood?

We used to have a powder in Europe that we would out at the entrance (in a wall or so) where (not bees but wasps) went in. They'd track it in and the nest (including the queen) died. I've not found that here in the US. Maybe @EatenByLimestone knows?
 

Montanalocal

Feeling the Heat
Dec 22, 2014
442
Helena MT
I was told this by a beekeeper and it absolutely works. Take a hand carry weed sprayer, fill it with water and one cup of liquid dish soap. Spraying it on the bees clogs their breathing apparatus and kills them quickly and humanely.
 

peakbagger

Minister of Fire
Jul 11, 2008
6,497
Northern NH
If its truly bees nesting in your wood pile a local beekeeper may be interested in recovering the hive. There are also several wild bees that live in NH in addition to honey bees. On the other hand if its wasps or hornets than you either DIY or pay someone.
 

Highbeam

Minister of Fire
Dec 28, 2006
19,176
Mt. Rainier Foothills, WA
Just poison them like normal. You can’t “contaminate” the wood pile with insecticide.
 

EatenByLimestone

Minister of Fire
We used to have a powder in Europe that we would out at the entrance (in a wall or so) where (not bees but wasps) went in. They'd track it in and the nest (including the queen) died. I've not found that here in the US. Maybe @EatenByLimestone knows?
We use insecticidal dust. We apply it in cracks and crevices, voids, etc.

We don't use it for nests that can be removed as it isn't needed.

In this instance you'd want to use a contact killer to kill the adults. Then the nest can easily be removed. Be careful as, well, it hurts when you get stung.
 
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EbS-P

Minister of Fire
Jan 19, 2019
1,255
SE North Carolina
JP the bee man on YouTube uses this.
Blythewood Bee Company Honey-B-Gone Honeybee Repellent Amazon product
 

kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
5,975
07462
Might be hard to see the nest with the color contrast, look for grey paper - I'm an expect, hit a baldface hornets nest with the chainsaw last summer, I was reminded of the power of those little guys about 15 times in less then a 10sec. Provided good neighborhood entertainment.
 
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Bad LP

Minister of Fire
Nov 28, 2014
1,737
Northern Maine
I was told this by a beekeeper and it absolutely works. Take a hand carry weed sprayer, fill it with water and one cup of liquid dish soap. Spraying it on the bees clogs their breathing apparatus and kills them quickly and humanely.
Why kill them?
 
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Sawset

Minister of Fire
Feb 14, 2015
1,203
Palmyra, WI
Could relocate them.
Just bang on the nest a little, in they go.

Pictures.jpg
 

xman23

Minister of Fire
Oct 7, 2008
2,334
Lackawaxen PA
I would wait till winter then go in there and pull them out.
 
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cahaak

Member
Feb 12, 2012
47
MN Twin Cities
If you want to actually kill them, then one shot with a diluted bifenthrin spray in water, at most two will do the trick. It is a contact killer, but they will get a little residual on them and that will be the end, it will kill the nest too. I use it for other pests, but a 32 oz concentrated container lasts me about five or more years worth of spraying (I use if for mosquitoes and ticks, japanese beetles...) If you have a desirable bee population, it is non discriminatory and will get all your honey bees and bumble bees. Diluted it is about 1/2 oz / gallon and that goes a long ways.
 

Stinkpickle

Minister of Fire
Jan 13, 2015
576
Iowa
I would definitely ask around for beekeepers to relocate if they are honeybees, but if they’re yellow jackets like I have, I would nuke the wood pile.
 

PaulBunyun

New Member
Oct 15, 2019
40
Michigan
If they are true honey bees please find a local bee keeper to take them. Hornets or wasp, take a shop vac set it up at the entrance and fill it with water+dish soap and let it run for a couple hours. Did this to get rid of a wasp nest in my sidding.
 
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NewGuy132

New Member
Jan 22, 2021
52
MA
If you want to actually kill them, then one shot with a diluted bifenthrin spray in water, at most two will do the trick. It is a contact killer, but they will get a little residual on them and that will be the end, it will kill the nest too. I use it for other pests, but a 32 oz concentrated container lasts me about five or more years worth of spraying (I use if for mosquitoes and ticks, japanese beetles...) If you have a desirable bee population, it is non discriminatory and will get all your honey bees and bumble bees. Diluted it is about 1/2 oz / gallon and that goes a long ways.
I use the same thing around the house. Works great. Had a BFH nest on my front porch and they got the dogs a couple times. I gave the nest a liberal spray and in 1 day there was no activity.