Buying another saw: Husky 365 or 562xp

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Todd67

Minister of Fire
Jun 25, 2012
940
Northern NY
I don't own a 24" bar, so I can't comment on the difference between the 20" & the 24". I do like the portability of the 20" bar though, especially when bucking firewood logs to size.
 

NoobTube

Burning Hunk
Nov 11, 2013
225
Seymour, CT
gotcha, I just have a couple pretty large trees that I have been taking them down where the 24" bar makes sense.
 
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Todd67

Minister of Fire
Jun 25, 2012
940
Northern NY
gotcha, I just have a couple pretty large trees that I have been taking them down where the 24" bar makes sense.

That makes sense. You can use your Echo saw for the small work if you need to.

Just like my situation, I use my Husky 440 with the 16 or 18" bars for limbing and light work, and my 562 for the heavy cutting.
 

Medic21

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2017
1,160
Northern Indiana
Thanks Medic for that last bit. I saw the hot start procedure, and apparently they actually put the hot start procedure on the saw. I didn't visually verify that. So now I'm wondering if i should start with the 20" bar instead of the 24... I just figured this thing should likely do pretty well with the 24" bar. Its only a $20 difference between the 20 and 24" from my dealer.


I run an 18” on mine. if I’m cutting anything bigger than 18”-20” inches I’ll grab a bigger saw. For me it’s about the speed and what’s comfortable to run all day long. The 562 and 362 are my go to, limbing, and everyday use saws. I switch which one I take just to equal out the hours on them. When I know I’m going to drop a tree I take the 441 or 461 and one of the 60cc saws. Having time to send a txt msg while cutting with a .325 chain saw is worse than the extra weight to me.

A 24” on that saw is ok, make sure the Oiler is cranked up and if you bury it make sure to take your time and not force it. There is something to be said about not bending over as much but, be very careful using the tip of that bar vs your little echo. Tons more power and chain speed and it will bite fast. When it kicks you will feel it. Congrats on the saw, you will not be disappointed in the least.
 
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Medic21

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2017
1,160
Northern Indiana
I’ll also add that until you’ve ran it awhile stick to low kickback chains. I cannot stress how much more powerful and different this saw will be. A lot of the chainsaw injuries I’ve seen working EMS have been the first time someone used a powerful, professional grade, saw and the first thing they say is how they’ve been running saws for years and never did this.
 
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Todd67

Minister of Fire
Jun 25, 2012
940
Northern NY
Very good point! That 562 with a full chisel chain will try to pull itself out of your hand when it goes through hardwood. Let the weight if the saw do the cutting for you. No need to "press" the saw through the wood. Just hang on and enjoy the "ride":eek:
 

NoobTube

Burning Hunk
Nov 11, 2013
225
Seymour, CT
I think this saw will come with a full chisel chain. I have no intention of muscling this thing. My brother is a emergency room nurse and has been an EMT for 16 years. He's seen some serious stuff (as Im sure you have as well medic). I'm going to get myself a helmet with a face guard. I asked for chaps for Christmas, so we will see if I get some.
 

Todd67

Minister of Fire
Jun 25, 2012
940
Northern NY
Good idea! I wear chaps and the Husky helmet with the face shield and ear muffs. Let the wood chips fly::-)
 

Medic21

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2017
1,160
Northern Indiana
I love the Bugs goggles.

D5572465-5293-48D5-BC4A-6DEFEC444D19.jpeg

Wife, RN/Paramedic, was not happy the faceshield went away when she stitched me up from a plastic wedge that smacked me in the face.

E34F277C-A4AD-4399-AECF-288993138081.jpeg
 
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NoobTube

Burning Hunk
Nov 11, 2013
225
Seymour, CT
Those goggles are perfect since they almost never fog up where as the shields and safety glasses always seem to fog up.
 

TreePointer

Minister of Fire
Sep 22, 2010
3,122
PA
Just to clarify, note that full chisel tooth shape does not necessarily mean the chain does not have "low-kickback" features. With that being stated, full chisel chain does tend to be more "grabby," regardless of whether it's a standard or low-kickback model.

1. There are full chisel and semi-chisel chains that are low-kickback.
2. There are full chisel and semi-chisel chains that are NOT low-kickback.
3. If you want more effective low-kickback functionality, combine low-kickback chain with a low-kickback bar.

The drawback of a low-kickback bars is that they're less effective when plunge/bore cutting. The more rounded tip of standard bars is better for bore cutting.

Also, low-kickback bars often have less expensive laminate construction, a non-replaceable sprocket (well at least not easily replaceable), and are a little less durable. In my experience, if you don't abuse laminate bars (use as a pry bar) they do just fine.
 
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NoobTube

Burning Hunk
Nov 11, 2013
225
Seymour, CT
Duly noted TreePointer. I do plan on halving some of these rounds and I understand that there is a higher likelihood of kickback with a plunge cut. The way I've always done them is to start out at more of a 45* angle get a nice groove, and easily and slowly with very little pressure, raise the saw up and let it sit down into the kerf.

Even on a LP chain you can get kick back and i learned my lesson a long time ago with a scare when I was trying to do a plunge cut for the first time. I went straight at it. It rode that round straight up and almost into me. Thankfully I was not directly over the saw when I did that. Ever since then, I refrain from plunge cuts, and when I do them, I'm super careful.
 
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kennyp2339

Minister of Fire
Feb 16, 2014
6,713
07462
I picked up a new Husky 465 x-torque w/ 20" bar 3 months ago, very pleased with it and a much better improvement from the Husky 359 w/ 20" bar.
The nice thing with the 465 is the auto tune carb imo. The saw came with a 24" bar but I exchanged that for a 20" since I have all my chains at 20" now.
 
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Medic21

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2017
1,160
Northern Indiana
Duly noted TreePointer. I do plan on halving some of these rounds and I understand that there is a higher likelihood of kickback with a plunge cut. The way I've always done them is to start out at more of a 45* angle get a nice groove, and easily and slowly with very little pressure, raise the saw up and let it sit down into the kerf.

Even on a LP chain you can get kick back and i learned my lesson a long time ago with a scare when I was trying to do a plunge cut for the first time. I went straight at it. It rode that round straight up and almost into me. Thankfully I was not directly over the saw when I did that. Ever since then, I refrain from plunge cuts, and when I do them, I'm super careful.

You more than likely would have eaten the saw you are buying. I would caution you to not even attempt a plunge cut till your used to the saw.
 
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NoobTube

Burning Hunk
Nov 11, 2013
225
Seymour, CT
We have a Kubota where we are cutting so we should be able to get them on the trailer if they can't be lifted. And I'll have my maul so I can always split it the good ole' fashion way.
 
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Zack R

Feeling the Heat
Sep 27, 2017
423
Sisters, OR
flic.kr
Get the 365, I have one and it will cover all of your firewood needs. Run a 20" bar for most stuff, larger if needed. Its a magnesium case pro saw that is easy to repair and will last the rest of your woodcutting life if properly cared for.

The 365 I use is a 2000 model year and is showing no signs of slowing down anytime soon. First pull it pops, second pull it starts. If I'm fast enough to close the choke it can sometimes start on the first pull.

upload_2018-12-12_11-5-40.png
 
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Zack R

Feeling the Heat
Sep 27, 2017
423
Sisters, OR
flic.kr
I’ll also add that until you’ve ran it awhile stick to low kickback chains. I cannot stress how much more powerful and different this saw will be. A lot of the chainsaw injuries I’ve seen working EMS have been the first time someone used a powerful, professional grade, saw and the first thing they say is how they’ve been running saws for years and never did this.

Good call.... the key thing on a powerful saw is to have an exit plan. My first few cuts went through a lot faster than I was used to with a smaller saw and it did surprise me a bit.

I run full chisel, full skip chains (all my cutting is in pine) which can be a kickback mess if you let them. The key is to always know where the bar is and what it might possibly run into.

It seems to me the highest chance of injury would be from limbing with a smaller saw. Lots of movement, less time taken to focus on each cut, and a lot of exposure to the legs and feet area.

Take your time, be deliberate in each move, have an exit plan and stay safe!
 
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WiscWoody

Minister of Fire
Dec 24, 2011
2,046
Winter WI
Like I’ve said on a few other threads here, I have a 562XP that I had ported from a guy that’s good at doing the job here in Wisconsin. I run a 20" bar on the saw and I love it. It has the power that a 390XP would- around 6hp and it’s not real heavy like my 28" 390XP is which is also ported. It took some getting used to the different startup procedure especially when the saw was not hot but just warm so I wouldn’t flood it but now I have it all down and I have no problems starting the saw either cold, warm or hot. It’s a great saw!
 
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NoobTube

Burning Hunk
Nov 11, 2013
225
Seymour, CT
Got it tonight ya'll! Wisc Woody, I just did the exact same thing you were talking about regarding learning to start it when its warm. If its warm, don't touch the decompression button... Don't touch the button prime bulb right? Also don't open the choke... Just turn it to the run position. Either way. You can tell this sucker is gonna rip!

20181212_182529.jpg
 

WiscWoody

Minister of Fire
Dec 24, 2011
2,046
Winter WI
Got it tonight ya'll! Wisc Woody, I just did the exact same thing you were talking about regarding learning to start it when its warm. If its warm, don't touch the decompression button... Don't touch the button prime bulb right? Also don't open the choke... Just turn it to the run position. Either way. You can tell this sucker is gonna rip!

View attachment 235625
Nice saw! Well, if it’s fairly hot- like within a few minutes of running the saw I use the decompression button and just pull it and my saw will start right up but if it sits a bit and cools down some I decompress it, push the bulb once and I set the choke then back it off half way and it always starts. YMMV.... my saw is one of the first ones made and I think they’ve improved on them since. And the prime bulb isn’t a real primer, it just gets gas into the carb not the combustion chamber like a real primer-I think. Someone here might have a better explanation of what it does. You’ll like the saw- especially if you get it ported someday.
 
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WiscWoody

Minister of Fire
Dec 24, 2011
2,046
Winter WI
Nice saw! Well, if it’s fairly hot- like within a few minutes of running the saw I use the decompression button and just pull it and my saw will start right up but if it sits a bit and cools down some I decompress it, push the bulb once and I set the choke then back it off half way and it always starts. YMMV.... my saw is one of the first ones made and I think they’ve improved on them since. And the prime bulb isn’t a real primer, it just gets gas into the carb not the combustion chamber like a real primer-I think. Someone here might have a better explanation of what it does. You’ll like the saw- especially if you get it ported someday.

What bar length did you get, maybe a 24"?
 
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WiscWoody

Minister of Fire
Dec 24, 2011
2,046
Winter WI
Very good point! That 562 with a full chisel chain will try to pull itself out of your hand when it goes through hardwood. Let the weight if the saw do the cutting for you. No need to "press" the saw through the wood. Just hang on and enjoy the "ride":eek:
Yes, that’s what I run on my 562XP is full chisel with a standard non safety bar. I have my rakers filed down a little more than usual but not overkill since it’s been ported so the saw is a real chipper! It cuts through 10" limbs in seconds.
 
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NoobTube

Burning Hunk
Nov 11, 2013
225
Seymour, CT
What bar length did you get, maybe a 24"?

It is indeed the 24... I think in the future, i'm going to get a 20" bar for it but get the new lightweight Husky bar that came out. Dealer said its pricey though...

I think i shouldnt have pressed the decompression button after running it for a very short while. I think that is what somewhat flooded it. To clear it I just kept pulling until that sucker started spitting some smoke... lol. Either way, will get used to it by using it. I plan on cutting Saturday. My buddies 590 is new and for some reason it bogs on throttle pull (not in a cut) You think he needs to richen it up a bit? I know they say they come really lean from Echo.
 
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Todd67

Minister of Fire
Jun 25, 2012
940
Northern NY
Sometimes my 562 is easier to warm-start without pressing the decompression button in.

My run/choke/stop button stays in the run position at all times, unless I pull out & up to put it in choke, or I press it down to kill the engine, after which time it goes back to the run (middle) position. It's just a single red button, not the double blue & red buttons. It's an early model 562xp from 2012, so I don't know what has changed on them.
 

WiscWoody

Minister of Fire
Dec 24, 2011
2,046
Winter WI
Sometimes my 562 is easier to warm-start without pressing the decompression button in.

My run/choke/stop button stays in the run position at all times, unless I pull out & up to put it in choke, or I press it down to kill the engine, after which time it goes back to the run (middle) position. It's just a single red button, not the double blue & red buttons. It's an early model 562xp from 2012, so I don't know what has changed on them.
Right, that’s the same thing I have on my saw. Sometimes when the saw is warm I’ll set the choke but then bring the lever down a bit so I just have partial choke. It works for me.
 
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