chimney leaks in rain, why?

paulmars

Member
Feb 10, 2017
45
fl
All the screws are sealed on the outside with silicone sealant. Also, a bead of silicone on top that support piece that twists around the pipe. Pipes are installed in proper direction, so its not leaking in the pipe assemble joints. Every pipe seam in the garage drips water when it rains.

I cant figure out where it comes in. Id rather not get up there with a hose. It only leaks when there is a lot of rain. Either very hard rain or just a long rain.

Ideas?

pics here: https://www.diychatroom.com/f17/chimney-leaks-rain-why-685761/#post6135701

tks,
pa
 
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Reactions: Seasoned Oak

DAKSY

Patriot Guard Rider Moderator
Staff member
First of all, that's not a chimney.
It's connector pipe & is meant to be used INSIDE.
That is not anywhere near a SAFE install.
Everything from the wall pass thru needs to be Class A chimney.
 

salecker

Minister of Fire
Aug 22, 2010
1,082
Northern Canada
pipes are going in the wrong direction...
i did that once when i was young and stupid, in a wall tent it sucked shite for a couple of days everything got a slight smell of cresote as it would leak out the joints and rundown the outside of the pipe.
 

salecker

Minister of Fire
Aug 22, 2010
1,082
Northern Canada
Which one was leaking?
 

paulmars

Member
Feb 10, 2017
45
fl
Im sure the lengthwise vertical seams are too tight to leak, but for some reason I installed the horiz piece with seam on top, so water was just sitting there. A bead of silicone fixed that.

the horiz slope is well above the min required by the codes. the operational draft is well within furnace spec.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,570
central pa
Im sure the lengthwise vertical seams are too tight to leak, but for some reason I installed the horiz piece with seam on top, so water was just sitting there. A bead of silicone fixed that.

the horiz slope is well above the min required by the codes. the operational draft is well within furnace spec.
So you are concerned about meeting the code requirements for slope of the horizontal section. But no concern for any of the other codes being violated? Many of which pose serious safety risks.
 

paulmars

Member
Feb 10, 2017
45
fl
I read all the codes. then did further research then decided which codes to follow and which not. So far no one has explained what those risks are. Its been two years and except for the water leak which is now fixed, everything is fine.
 

Bad LP

Minister of Fire
Nov 28, 2014
1,177
Northern Maine
I read all the codes. then did further research then decided which codes to follow and which not. So far no one has explained what those risks are. Its been two years and except for the water leak which is now fixed, everything is fine.
Did you really pick and choose what part of the codes to follow or ignore?
 

brenndatomu

Minister of Fire
Aug 21, 2013
5,062
NE Ohio

BigJ273

Burning Hunk
Feb 15, 2015
220
Maryland
yes I will, he says while he wonders what might catch fire.
The creosote that’s gonna build up in that pipe for one....the possibilities are endless. Take it from someone who had a fire. Trust the people on this forum, most of them know what they are talking about. Don’t be so naive. They’re just trying to help. To be honest, that setup is ridiculous. Period.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,570
central pa
I ignore nothing, not even my crazy neighbor.
Where in the code book or the manual for your furnace did it say you could pass single wall connector pipe through a wall? What clearance to combustibles required by you furnace? What model furnace is it?

What concerns me is the lack of proper clearances causing pyrolisis over time and igniting adjacent combustibles
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,570
central pa
I read all the codes. then did further research then decided which codes to follow and which not. So far no one has explained what those risks are. Its been two years and except for the water leak which is now fixed, everything is fine.
Everyone here and on the other forum you linked to told you that your "chimney" is unsafe. I think that should tell you something.

You also have a serious risk of the single wall black pipe collapsing because it is not meant to be used outside. It will deteriorate quickly. And when it does it could easily cause CO to back up into the house.
 
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paulmars

Member
Feb 10, 2017
45
fl
when I click quote, a pop up says "multiply quotes blocked for...", then it disappeared, so "What clearance to combustibles required by you furnace? " Honestly, I dont remember, but I did read and complied with it. I read everything carrier published on my model and more.

"Everyone here and on the other forum you linked to told you that your "chimney" is unsafe. I think that should tell you something. " I was told the same about the original install in 2001 using single wall galvanized. Those comments and these do get my attention and Ive done additional research and as yet I see no practical reason to change anything. This pipe is feet away from everything in garage, until it reaches the gable. At that point the gable hole is almost as large as the 22 gauge thimble that I made. At the point where it passes thru the gable I measured the pipe temp many times at many points in the furnace cycle and it's safe.

I inspect it regularly and if it starts to deteriorate, I will not ignore.it.

"Do you suppose that painters caulk on top of single wall will hold up to the heat? " See attached.
 

Attachments

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
21,570
central pa
when I click quote, a pop up says "multiply quotes blocked for...", then it disappeared, so "What clearance to combustibles required by you furnace? " Honestly, I dont remember, but I did read and complied with it. I read everything carrier published on my model and more.

"Everyone here and on the other forum you linked to told you that your "chimney" is unsafe. I think that should tell you something. " I was told the same about the original install in 2001 using single wall galvanized. Those comments and these do get my attention and Ive done additional research and as yet I see no practical reason to change anything. This pipe is feet away from everything in garage, until it reaches the gable. At that point the gable hole is almost as large as the 22 gauge thimble that I made. At the point where it passes thru the gable I measured the pipe temp many times at many points in the furnace cycle and it's safe.

I inspect it regularly and if it starts to deteriorate, I will not ignore.it.

"Do you suppose that painters caulk on top of single wall will hold up to the heat? " See attached.
It requires 9" above 4" to the side and either a compliant properly sized masonry chimney. Or a listed prefab chimney. T doesn't look like you have 9" above it. That metal " thimble" will transfer heat to the wood. And your"chimney" is not a chimney.
 

maple1

Minister of Fire
Sep 15, 2011
10,484
Nova Scotia
You might as well just stop paying your insurance premiums, because if anything ever happens here, your coverage will be useless. There is no way a claim would be paid on anything related to this install - so many code violations. And code violations most always = unsafe & uninsurable.

Assuming you have house insurance, that is.