Conflicting information about oiling convection fan.

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Kevman

New Member
Dec 10, 2015
2
CT
The manual for my Whitfield Advantage Plus insert says that I should oil both the blower and the combustion fans, which I thought was rare. However, I do not know if either of the fans are original (guessing it was in stalled in 1998), so I was hoping I could figure it out via the model numbers on the fans, but no luck. The combustion fan had 1 of it's 2 rubber plugs remaining, so I did oil those ports and covered them with small pieces of flue tape because those plugs are designed to make me feel stupid.

The blower looks like it has ports (no plugs), but when I shine a light back there, it looks like they are just holes. I don't see where the oil would go. Wish I had inspected it better when I had it off the unit.

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Stovensen

Minister of Fire
Feb 1, 2010
523
Denmark, EU
Hello Kevman and welcome to the forum, good point you raise here. I fully understand your confusion and to add to this confusion, here's what my owners manual says: "The blowers are permanently lubricated by the manufacturer" :rolleyes:
In this case we need to take what is written in the manual with a grain of salt and do some close inspection ourselves ( which is what you have done already ).

What is written on the motor labels is what counts here. Also, do the lube holes lead to the bearing bushings through a small duct? You're aware of this inspection too, as stated in your post.
My Whitfield Quest Plus is from 1998 like your Advantage Plus. It still has the original blowers running perfectly well.
My convection blower needs oiling twice a year with non detergent SAE 20 oil. "3-in-one" oil in the blue can should be fine for this.
My combustion motor requires no oiling. See pics of my motor labels:
DSC00877.JPG DSC00390'.JPG
 
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Arti

Feeling the Heat
Feb 14, 2014
386
South West Wisconsin
To the left of where the wires enter the motor and just left of the black clip on the fan end are oil ports. A couple of drops of electric motor oil will extend the life of the bearings.
A good cleaning with a blast of air to clean the windings will get some air thru the motor to help keep it cool.
 

Bioburner

Moderator
Aug 4, 2012
7,317
West central Mn
I use a syringe with a long needle to service these ported motors and use a synthetic oil.
Good shot of air to clean out the dust bunnies is usually in order and the simple service can extend the service life of the motors to several decades.
 

bags

Minister of Fire
Oct 12, 2014
2,407
Kentucky
Let me tell you about my "sealed and permanently lubed U-joints and yokes in my Duramax's drive train. They all failed and seized up at 62,000 miles on the ODO. They were replaced with new ones that had grease fittings too.>>

I'd follow what the fellows above are saying and shoot them with some lube. Moving parts need lube. Period. I think they throw in these non lube or sealed parts for a reason. To sell you more when they head south on you. Just my buck fifties worth. .02 cents doesn't get you far today. Neither does dry squeaky, hot from friction moving parts. LOL!
 

Kevman

New Member
Dec 10, 2015
2
CT
Thanks for the replies. I'll confirm the ducts and use that syringe method. That will make the 3-in-1 go in a bit easier, then I'll just cover them with foil tape as well.
 
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