Corrugated Plastic Roofing for Cover

EPS

Burning Hunk
Jun 5, 2015
156
NH
I am planning on switching from tarps to long pieces of corrugated plastic roofing for my outdoor stacks soon. We get very high wind around here, so I am wondering if people can post pictures of how they secure the plastic or sheetmetal roofing over their wood so I can get some design ideas.

Thanks!
 

Gearhead660

Minister of Fire
Dec 20, 2018
648
Southern WI
Have seen some tie the top to the bottom pallet/board. I would just place some extra pallets or cement blocks on top. Anything I had laying around with some weight to it.
 
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Grizzerbear

Minister of Fire
Feb 12, 2019
976
SW Missoura
I put uglies, cinder blocks, any thing laying around with weight on top to hold it down. It gets windy here also. So much so that I have had cinder blocks still be thrown off. I will take a roll of tie wire and run it through the bottom of the pallets, all the way around the wood stack and then tie back to itself. Then you can just twist it tight. That also helps to keep the roofing panels bent down so they don't catch the wind
 

Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
810
Massachusetts
I think the sturdiest option is to build small lean-to structures with rafters and/or strapping you can screw the roof into. You can make it as simple or fancy as you'd like.

You could even just screw some 2x4s into the wood stack itself so you have something to attach the roof to. I did that as an experiment on one stack. It's just chainsaw rough work with scrap lumber that took a couple hrs. We have had a few nights of sustained 50 mph winds and it held up just fine. I plan to build legit more permanent structures anchored to the ground this year but this was fun in a pinch.

These are the screws you want:

Screenshot_20210318-130510_Chrome.jpg
20210118_151044.jpg
 

ClintonH

Burning Hunk
Jan 4, 2014
108
NW OH
I think the sturdiest option is to build small lean-to structures with rafters and/or strapping you can screw the roof into. You can make it as simple or fancy as you'd like.

You could even just screw some 2x4s into the wood stack itself so you have something to attach the roof to. I did that as an experiment on one stack. It's just chainsaw rough work with scrap lumber that took a couple hrs. We have had a few nights of sustained 50 mph winds and it held up just fine. I plan to build legit more permanent structures anchored to the ground this year but this was fun in a pinch.

These are the screws you want:

View attachment 276647 View attachment 276648
+1 for that hardware choice. I am tacking down old metal no my OLD OLD barns semi-regularly. Those screws have a much larger shank and can be used in nail holes where nails have worked/rusted off. I have old lead-capped nails that work out over time and with wind. The screws HOLD.
 

MissMac

Minister of Fire
Dec 4, 2017
784
NW Ontario
1616245242650.png

If you take a look at that stacked birch with the tin roof, you can see that I just throw some long pieces of rope over the sides and run it under the stacks and cinch it up tight to the point that it bends the tin down just a bit. It's held up great all winter, and had about 3ft of snow on it up until a few weeks ago. The pool noodles were to keep me from slicing my face open by accident going to/from the shed - covered up the sharp bits on the edge of tin :)
 

ColdNorCal

Feeling the Heat
Mar 6, 2018
311
Newcastle, Ca.
Did this on the cheap. Check out craigslist. Bought all that metal roofing and several more pieces from craigslist for $30. Pallets, 4x6's, old fascia 2x6s, bricks... left over from deliveries and various renovations. Used ratchet tie down straps to hold roof in place. This works for me because it can be extended, moved, removed, made smaller... and is cheaper then a structure.

This is the over flow wood so to speak. I have several cords stored in the barn.



Wood.jpg
 

D8Chumley

Minister of Fire
Jun 25, 2013
1,872
Collegeville PA
View attachment 276791

If you take a look at that stacked birch with the tin roof, you can see that I just throw some long pieces of rope over the sides and run it under the stacks and cinch it up tight to the point that it bends the tin down just a bit. It's held up great all winter, and had about 3ft of snow on it up until a few weeks ago. The pool noodles were to keep me from slicing my face open by accident going to/from the shed - covered up the sharp bits on the edge of tin :)
Great idea on the pool noodles! I might have to employ that technique myself, I don’t need to get any uglier haha
 

Caw

Minister of Fire
May 26, 2020
810
Massachusetts
I made sure to make my roofs just high enough to avoid scalping myself lol. If you can't though I second the noodles idea!