Covering my wood

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peakbagger

Minister of Fire
Hearth Supporter
Jul 11, 2008
8,934
Northern NH
Had some snow overnight in NH,as you can see I finally got all my wood covered as wet wood does not dry very quickly. The piles in the foreground are mostly pine boards cut over this summer with one pile of hardwood in the left foreground covered with a plastic signboard, the pallets keep it from blowing off. I use a corrugated PVC (Palruf) that I buy at Home Depot for most of the new roofs. Is a clear light weight but remarkably tough. Some of the roofs with this product have had 3' of snow stacked on them. As soon as there is warm day, the blocks of snow start to slowly slide down and drop off the edge (until the snow builds up too high).
Covering my wood




The wood will stay out on the sunny side of the house for hopefully two years and then get hauled out back to a combination of a woodshed and two stacks on either side of it close to my bulkhead.

There is obscured partial pile of pine from a solar kiln attempt behind the solar trailer. It predates the trailer and will get moved one of these days but its handy for small loads. Off the right on the edge of the shot is a mix of scrap steel roofing and some PVC to finish it off. The long pile has very old galvanized sheet roofing a friend gave me. It leaks a bit on the seams. Way out partially hidden by a beech is my latest roof. These covers are all supported off the wood piles themselves by screwing uprights with deck screws into logs in the pile. This is to get around the local tax collector who considers anything attached to the ground a "structure" that can be taxed. Most of the wood is scrap laying around although with my new surplus of sawn wood, I have been making the roof supports out of poplar. As long as its under cover it seems to hold up.
 
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Nice operation you have there!
 
My friend has a bandsaw mill. I did a thread on the white pine adventure https://www.hearth.com/talk/threads/one-less-big-white-pine.198952/ No pictures of my friends bandsaw mill but some pictures of the Lucas Mill I needed to use to process the 48" diameter rounds into something small enough for my friend's bandsaw mill to process.
 
No plan to sell, I just needed to get a large tree out of the way, so I figured I would get some wood out of it. I did someone a favor and had the Lucas mill cut a 2" thick by 46" wide slab for a bar he was working on. The bummer was the outer 3" of sap wood turned dark but the person who got it, he likes the look. I did end up with a 24" wide 2" thick slab.
 
Palruff
Had some snow overnight in NH,as you can see I finally got all my wood covered as wet wood does not dry very quickly. The piles in the foreground are mostly pine boards cut over this summer with one pile of hardwood in the left foreground covered with a plastic signboard, the pallets keep it from blowing off. I use a corrugated PVC (Palruf) that I buy at Home Depot for most of the new roofs. Is a clear light weight but remarkably tough. Some of the roofs with this product have had 3' of snow stacked on them. As soon as there is warm day, the blocks of snow start to slowly slide down and drop off the edge (until the snow builds up too high).View attachment 318385



The wood will stay out on the sunny side of the house for hopefully two years and then get hauled out back to a combination of a woodshed and two stacks on either side of it close to my bulkhead.

There is obscured partial pile of pine from a solar kiln attempt behind the solar trailer. It predates the trailer and will get moved one of these days but its handy for small loads. Off the right on the edge of the shot is a mix of scrap steel roofing and some PVC to finish it off. The long pile has very old galvanized sheet roofing a friend gave me. It leaks a bit on the seams. Way out partially hidden by a beech is my latest roof. These covers are all supported off the wood piles themselves by screwing uprights with deck screws into logs in the pile. This is to get around the local tax collector who considers anything attached to the ground a "structure" that can be taxed. Most of the wood is scrap laying around although with my new surplus of sawn wood, I have been making the roof supports out of poplar. As long as its under cover it seems to hold up.
Is that Palruff roofing Really that tough? I've been thinking about replacing my rotting cedar shingle shed roof with it and also possibly a covered porch project and window/door overhang add on.
 
I am quite impressed with it, it looks fragile but it is holding up. The one thing to be aware of is cutting it not fun. It shatters with a regular circular saw and leaves a jagged edge. It would take out someone's eye in a second. I wear a coat and eye protection when cutting it. The consensus seems to be use an oscillating cutter with fine tooth blade to get a smoother edge. If possible, I would overlap to adjust the length to avoid cutting it. No doubt the UV will get to it someday but for my roofs they get removed every couple of years when I move the stacks.
 
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I am quite impressed with it, it looks fragile but it is holding up. The one thing to be aware of is cutting it not fun. It shatters with a regular circular saw and leaves a jagged edge. It would take out someone's eye in a second. I wear a coat and eye protection when cutting it. The consensus seems to be use an oscillating cutter with fine tooth blade to get a smoother edge. If possible, I would overlap to adjust the length to avoid cutting it. No doubt the UV will get to it someday but for my roofs they get removed every couple of years when I move the stacks.
Using a circular saw with a fine toothed plywood blade installed backwards works great too. I had to make cuts for the greenhouse and had no problem.
 
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I just saw a guy on youtube cut it with a dremel, and he made a custom cap by using a heat gun to Fold the Palruf into a cap.

Just found the link

 
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20240324_130813[1].jpg

An illustration on the strength of Palruff. I got 20" of snow last night. The wood pile in the center is covered with Palruff supported at approximately 18" intervals. The metal frame in the center had a similar load but I got out with the camera too late and it had warmed up enough for the same size snow pile to slide off. Of course, snow can only slide if there isnt a pile of snow where it needs to slide so I am not sure how long the pile on the right will take to self clear.
20240324_130828[1].jpg

The solar panels do not self clear as quickly so I had to rake them off. Normally I run a snowblower in front of the array to keep the pile in front of the lower edge clear but I am risking it . The snow was mounded up above the edge of the panel and I had to shovel it down. The pile in the center also has Palruff on it also but note the snow piled up out back. It will start to self clear but I expect that it will start sliding and get caught on the pile. The pile on the left has ancient galvanized roofing on it and it will tend to melt off instead of self clearing.

It is supposed to be rain later in the week, hopefully this is last big snow dump.
 
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That is a nice site. I'm heading to tuckermans in a few weeks. Hope theres enough snow to ride the entire sherburne down to the parking lot.
 
That is a nice site. I'm heading to tuckermans in a few weeks. Hope theres enough snow to ride the entire sherburne down to the parking lot.
My guess is probably not as things were getting patchy before and once we get long days and sun, the new snow tends to get burned off quick with traffic. Wildcat was hurting but this should carry them to their eclipse party. Driving by the Bowl today, the top of it that can be seen from RT 16 was looking good. The big issue right now is avalanches. The overflow side lots are not opened up yet so parking is currently limited.