cover the wood pile or not???????????

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Todd

Minister of Fire
Nov 19, 2005
9,306
NW Wisconsin
Depends on the weather. If it rains the tarps get rolled down, takes about 30 seconds. I leave them covered when the snow flies.
 

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johnnywarm

Minister of Fire
Sep 12, 2007
1,244
Connecticut
Todd said:
Depends on the weather. If it rains the tarps get rolled down, takes about 30 seconds. I leave them covered when the snow flies.

I like your way todd.

John
 

johnnywarm

Minister of Fire
Sep 12, 2007
1,244
Connecticut
[quote author="Adirondackwoodburner" date="1220033825"]think you need to add some more information like when was this stuff split and stacked first.


Being new i did not know to ask.i was thinking when it gets stacked first.Fresh wood.

John
 

billb3

Minister of Fire
Dec 14, 2007
4,674
SE Mass
Lots of wind and rain here.

Just a top to keep them dry, that way they're drying even when its raining.
 

johnnywarm

Minister of Fire
Sep 12, 2007
1,244
Connecticut
billb3 said:
Lots of wind and rain here.

Just a top to keep them dry, that way they're drying even when its raining.

No rain here.

John
 

iceman

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2006
2,386
Springfield Ma (western mass)
we had so much rain i covered in mid july... but just the top so it gets air ,, however the last 2 weeks have been pretty dry so i took the off.. but put them back on do to the threat of rain.......
but now is usually dry time of the year...and winter so i am not worried.... partially seasoned dries best in the winter .... as long as its not rainy!!!
 

johnnywarm

Minister of Fire
Sep 12, 2007
1,244
Connecticut
no cover on the two cords i have.i will cover them if we get a frost.

John
 

RedRanger

New Member
Nov 19, 2007
1,428
British Columbia
It would be no small stretch to say that Todd from Wisconsin has the art nailed down pat. Just goes to show that not all of us are "crazies" on this forum :smirk:

Even though we faithfully patrol our woodpiles everyday. ;-) Myself included, with beer in hand..
 

woodburn

Member
Oct 26, 2007
221
Long Island, New York
I cover topcover only when it rains during the spring and summer months. Sometime this month I will probably cover for the rest of the winter. I think it's crazy to wait until the first snow, freeze, or frost to cover. What if you have a few soaking rains soon before? Then the cold will prevent that wood from drying quickly enough and you'll have wet wood under those tarps. Cover when the wood is bone dry and keep it that way. That's the idea.
 

gibson

New Member
Apr 29, 2008
663
Lincoln, RI
I dont know much since this is my first year, but the most important thing has to be keeping it off the ground. It seems that during the summer anything up on pallets will dry quickly. I have some really good seasoned stuff that I have been slow in stacking, and man does it wick the moisture from the ground. It is like the pile makes a "steam room" effect. It will be stacked on pallets this weekend, hopefully, so it'll be fine. Once it it stacked, I throw some crappy blue tarp on the top. BTW... any of you guys from New England... say "tarp on the top" five times fast!
 

gary

New Member
Oct 29, 2006
70
St. George, KS
Nothing covered. 2 double stacks of oak sitting in shade won't be ready for another year. Will remain uncovered.
The stuff for this season won't be covered until the wet fall/winter weather moves in, then I'll cover completely.
 

johnnywarm

Minister of Fire
Sep 12, 2007
1,244
Connecticut
woodburn said:
I cover topcover only when it rains during the spring and summer months. Sometime this month I will probably cover for the rest of the winter. I think it's crazy to wait until the first snow, freeze, or frost to cover. What if you have a few soaking rains soon before? Then the cold will prevent that wood from drying quickly enough and you'll have wet wood under those tarps. Cover when the wood is bone dry and keep it that way. That's the idea.

I'm starting to think your way on the cover issue.
 

iceman

Minister of Fire
Nov 18, 2006
2,386
Springfield Ma (western mass)
i am telling you wood will dry jus as fast in the winter as any other month!!.... there are some exceptions....rainy summer.... you let the wood get covered with snow..etc summer (in my area) wood dries by sun n wind but our summers are usually humid so without wind and DIRECT sunlight well guess... fall usually dry cooler air and breezy... while aire temps are mid 60s-mid to mid 80s ..this can be great seasoning time .....winter bone dry air which equals max drying that cold frigid air at night will suck water outta anything!
 

stanleyjohn

Minister of Fire
Mar 29, 2008
506
southcentral Ct
Todd said:
Depends on the weather. If it rains the tarps get rolled down, takes about 30 seconds. I leave them covered when the snow flies.
nice set up todd! what do you use for weight on the side you roll up!2by4 wood??.also how does to stand up to the wind?I may do the same with my outside wood piles,
 
I cover the top and about 1 foot down on the sides with heavy tarps I got at Wally World. Like someone else said, cover the wood when dry to keep it dry. Makes sense to me.

I've had mine covered most of the summer as it has been very wet up here in New England this year. It seems like it has rained at least once a day everyday during July and August.
 

got wood?

New Member
Jan 4, 2006
164
Acton, MA
I can't be the only one who simply covers the top when done stacking. Spring/summer/fall I just cover the top of the rack as soon as it's a full rack. Then I don't think about it when it rains, hails or snows.
 

Catskill

New Member
got wood? said:
I can't be the only one who simply covers the top when done stacking. Spring/summer/fall I just cover the top of the rack as soon as it's a full rack. Then I don't think about it when it rains, hails or snows.
You're not alone. I do the same. I just cover the tops from the get go and walk away.
 

BrotherBart

Modestorator
Staff member
Catskill said:
got wood? said:
I can't be the only one who simply covers the top when done stacking. Spring/summer/fall I just cover the top of the rack as soon as it's a full rack. Then I don't think about it when it rains, hails or snows.
You're not alone. I do the same. I just cover the tops from the get go and walk away.
That makes three of us. I only dry wood once.
 

brewmaster15

New Member
Jul 31, 2008
7
Northford CT
I staple a piece of plastic on the tops, draped the sides maybe a few inches.....Sides open, wood off the ground..thats for any piles I have out in the open that are seasoned...If its green... I don't cover the top until its its seasoned..

I know a fellow out here that uses pieces of plywood when he has it instead of plastic...guess its like a mini-roof. :)

Cords I have under the porch are seasoned and uncovered..

-al
 

smokinj

Minister of Fire
Aug 11, 2008
15,980
Anderson, Indiana
The winds alone at my house would rip the tarps to shreads let alone the size i would need to cover my piles!
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
84,210
South Puget Sound, WA
You might try heavy duty pond liner instead of a tarp on top of the piles. That stuff is pretty tough.
 

smokinj

Minister of Fire
Aug 11, 2008
15,980
Anderson, Indiana
BeGreen said:
You might try heavy duty pond liner instead of a tarp on top of the piles. That stuff is pretty tough.
i have 2 piles that are 24'x24'x6' and working on my 3rd that pond matreial is high $ got in in full sun just have to make do
 

woodburn

Member
Oct 26, 2007
221
Long Island, New York
[...winter bone dry air which equals max drying that cold frigid air at night will suck water outta anything![/quote]

I understand what you are saying about winter air being less humid, bit I've never heard of cold air drying anything out quickly. Has anyone else had this experience? I am also curious because I just got a clothesline and am wondering if clothes will dry well outside in winter.
 

BrotherBart

Modestorator
Staff member
woodburn said:
[...winter bone dry air which equals max drying that cold frigid air at night will suck water outta anything!
I understand what you are saying about winter air being less humid, bit I've never heard of cold air drying anything out quickly. Has anyone else had this experience? I am also curious because I just got a clothesline and am wondering if clothes will dry well outside in winter.[/quote]

Ever had chapped lips? Ever watched snow evaporate with the air below freezing?

Most people dry the clothes inside in winter though. To humidify the house. Also, dropping your underwear and shattering it ain't cool.
 

woodburn

Member
Oct 26, 2007
221
Long Island, New York
Those are good points, especially about the underwear, but when air temps are below freezing, snow only evaporates if direct sunlight heats it to above freezing temps. Think about how quickly snow would evaporate on a July day. I think there's no comparison in how much the wood dries in summer as opposed to winter. Plus factor in the longer days with more sun. Of course, my piles are stacked in direct sun for the bulk of the day, so maybe one wouldn't notice quite as much of a difference if stacked in shade.
 
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