Dehumidifier drying technique

  • Active since 1995, Hearth.com is THE place on the internet for free information and advice about wood stoves, pellet stoves and other energy saving equipment.

    We strive to provide opinions, articles, discussions and history related to Hearth Products and in a more general sense, energy issues.

    We promote the EFFICIENT, RESPONSIBLE, CLEAN and SAFE use of all fuels, whether renewable or fossil.

Shrewboy

Member
Oct 15, 2020
92
Eastern Pennsylvania
Hello!

I was thinking about ways to dry out wood quicker, and I realized that I have a dehumidifier in my basement that is constantly spitting out low humidity, slightly warm air.

I put it under a storage shelf (followed instructions with enough room above the unit), rigged up some plywood to direct the airflow over my small basement wood pile, and waited.

After a few months, I found the wood has dried much faster than wood in the piles outside! (The wood in the picture is low right now, its usually piled up under the shelf, but I burned most of it)

Anyone else ever try this? Might be a good way to help dry out the wood you have stored for easy access during the dead of winter.

20210402_173226.jpg 20210402_173128.jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: hickoryhoarder

clancey

Minister of Fire
Feb 26, 2021
2,390
Colorado
I'll be glad when hot weather gets here for you so that you can dry out everything.. Would a fan help as well just guessing here..clancey
 
  • Like
Reactions: Shrewboy

spirilis

Minister of Fire
Sep 8, 2009
940
Baltimore, MD
Worth slapping on a Kill-A-Watt meter and quantifying the power usage of doing that. Might be a good deal, might not, hard to say without data.
 
  • Like
Reactions: hickoryhoarder

blades

Minister of Fire
Nov 23, 2008
3,784
WI, Leroy
Idea has merit cost is a factor. Most common dehumidifiers have very poor performance below apx 60 degs F.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Shrewboy

spirilis

Minister of Fire
Sep 8, 2009
940
Baltimore, MD
I already run the dehumidifier, my basement has mold issues and a lot of moisture, so it is killing 2 birds with 1 stone, to use it to also blow over the wood and dry that out as well
True... still adding that wood will raise the workload a bit (& moisture problems)
 

TradEddie

Minister of Fire
Jan 24, 2012
963
SE PA
All that moisture removed from the wood is now in your basement air, requiring the humidifier to run longer to dry the air out. This might be a useful trick in an emergency to deal with unseasoned wood, but unless you've got very inexpensive electricity, it's probably not cost-efficient. Put the wood outside and protect it from the rain.

TE
 
  • Like
Reactions: Shrewboy

ClintonH

Burning Hunk
Jan 4, 2014
145
NW OH
Not super-academic, but here's a decent explainer for dehumidifier operation. ...It isn't too terribly expensive, it would seem.
 

Shrewboy

Member
Oct 15, 2020
92
Eastern Pennsylvania
All that moisture removed from the wood is now in your basement air, requiring the humidifier to run longer to dry the air out. This might be a useful trick in an emergency to deal with unseasoned wood, but unless you've got very inexpensive electricity, it's probably not cost-efficient. Put the wood outside and protect it from the rain.

TE

Good point!
 

Supersurvey

Feeling the Heat
Jan 25, 2015
266
New Jersey
In my experience they cost about $1.00 per day to run.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Shrewboy

fire_man

Minister of Fire
Feb 6, 2009
2,676
North Eastern MA
If you are lucky enough to live in MA where the electric rates are north of 20 cents/KWH, a dehumifier gets really expensive.
I would not want to add wood moisture to the equation.
 

weatherguy

Minister of Fire
Feb 20, 2009
5,902
Central Mass
If you are lucky enough to live in MA where the electric rates are north of 20 cents/KWH, a dehumifier gets really expensive.
I would not want to add wood moisture to the equation.
Im in Mass, Im at 12kw, you can choose who your provider is.
 

fire_man

Minister of Fire
Feb 6, 2009
2,676
North Eastern MA
Im in Mass, Im at 12kw, you can choose who your provider is.


That is only the supplier portion of the bill.

The supplier portion of my bill is 10 cents/KWH. When I account for the additional delivery charges my overall rate is 25 cents/KWH.

You have to take the month's total bill and divide it by KWH used to get the overall rate you are actually paying.
MA has the third most expensive electric rate in the country.
 
Last edited:
  • Wow
Reactions: Shrewboy