Designing a wood stove setup with a classic look

Bstanford

Member
Mar 17, 2014
2
North Carolina
I have lurked around for a couple of years but I think this is my first post. I'm hoping for some advice on designing a fireplace for a new build.

We currently have a Buck model 81 and plan on taking it to the new house although I can't decide whether to build a conventional masonry fireplace and slide it back in or build an approved surround with chimney pipe up and out of the room... which I'm not a fan of that look.

It's hard to justify the cost of a masonry chimney but we do like that look. In our current setup, I had to cut away part of the damper throat to make room for the SS liner but wouldn't want to do that on a new chimney. Are there any other options on the market to get a liner through a chimney without altering it so it could be used as a standard fireplace if someone wanted?

Alternatively, if we went with a Class A setup and eventually changed to a stove with different height, would the entire chimney pipe have to be reinstalled to close the gap or make more room or are there extension pieces to make up that difference?

I like the look an inglenook, or maybe just a stove in an oversized fireplace. If anyone would like to share any examples of a similar look or description I'd really appreciate it!
 

fvhowler

Member
May 4, 2018
87
Heart of NC
We faced a similar situation when building our house. Plans called for traditional fireplace but I went with a freestanding wood stove. After ditching the traditional fireplace, I then moved the wood stove to more central location in house. To maintain a more traditional look, I put stone up the wall behind the stove and added a stone hearth. I went with doublewall stove pipe through the ceiling (much cheaper than building a chimney). I like the look of stove pipe running to the ceiling (to each his own, however) and also gives you more heat from the pipe. A stove in an oversized fireplace looks nice but that "look" would be expensive to build vs simple stove pipe.

Really depends on what you like and what you want from the stove. If you want more usable heat, go with free standing, out in the room in central location. Good luck with the build. You're in the enviable position to decide the location and design of your hearth area.
 
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Bstanford

Member
Mar 17, 2014
2
North Carolina
Thanks for your reply. I imagine your setup with the stoned wall and hearth looks great.

Can anyone comment on changing stoves that are a different height? Would I need to redo the entire chimney or are adapters available?
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,311
South Puget Sound, WA
Building a masonry surround (fireplace) for a woodstove will be costly. If building new and the goal is for a fireplace look, then a modern, EPA zero-clearance fireplace is often the best option. It's more efficient and costs less. Buck makes the 74ZC for this purpose. It's the model 74 in a protective metal shell. There are many other brands that also could work depending on the style and heating capacity desired.

Another advantage of a good ZC fireplace is that some offer the ability to duct heat from the fireplace to distribute it into another area of the house. We would need to know more about the new house to advise further.
 

fvhowler

Member
May 4, 2018
87
Heart of NC
Maybe not exactly what you are looking for but here's what we did with our new build. The original plans called for the fireplace be at end of room (just left of the Christmas tree). I moved the stove to this location which is more central to the house, open floor plan that includes kitchen, dining and living room and two story. I have 14 ft ceilings here but only 10 ft where stove pipe meets ceiling. Kept the stone look but chose efficiency in heating with free standing wood stove. In my climate, this little stove heats over 2,4,00 sq ft.
 

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begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,311
South Puget Sound, WA
Maybe not exactly what you are looking for but here's what we did with our new build. The original plans called for the fireplace be at end of room (just left of the Christmas tree). I moved the stove to this location which is more central to the house, open floor plan that includes kitchen, dining and living room and two story. I have 14 ft ceilings here but only 10 ft where stove pipe meets ceiling. Kept the stone look but chose efficiency in heating with free standing wood stove. In my climate, this little stove heats over 2,4,00 sq ft.
Nice looking install and a very contented pup. I hope Regency brings the Hampton stoves back. They are good heaters.
 

fvhowler

Member
May 4, 2018
87
Heart of NC
BG, this stove is very good heater, well built and enamel finish is top notch. Although I don't have any experience with other epa stoves, I'd would recommend this unit. I have burned this stove for 3 years now and there has been a learning curve as with any new stove. It throws out amazing heat and can go up to 8 hours between loads and have an easy restart. The stove is pup approved as well. Maybe the Hampton line will come back.
 

bholler

Chimney sweep
Staff member
Jan 14, 2014
23,996
central pa
There are a couple Hamptons now with more supposedly on the way
 

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
87,311
South Puget Sound, WA
There are a couple Hamptons now with more supposedly on the way
No freestanders yet, hope they are coming back soon. The H200 and H300 line were ideal for fireplaces.