Dutchwest XL 2462 Rebuild

Zkx14

Member
Dec 31, 2015
113
South Central PA
Here is what it looks like today. Cement grooves cleaned and most of the gaskets are replaced.

According to the manual it's 634lbs complete. Not very easy to move. So I will build it where it will sit.

This is my second round with this stove. I had to rebuild it when I got it, but I used (repaired) the inner top that already had issues then. It has burnt many cords for us already and should be like new and ready to burn many more soon.
2016-01-01 17.31.17.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Like
Reactions: vinny11950

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
84,265
South Puget Sound, WA
Thanks for documenting. Should be interesting to follow.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Zkx14

Zkx14

Member
Dec 31, 2015
113
South Central PA
It won't be a complete step by step, but I will get pics along the way. So to start let go back to the problem. The original inner top design was poor to say the least. Without a full metal circle around the cat, how did they ever think this would not eventually warp? I guess the idea was so it would not crack there...
2016-01-02 08.25.45.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

vinny11950

Minister of Fire
May 17, 2010
1,682
Eastern Long Island, NY
Thanks for the thread. I love the pictures and the info.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Zkx14

Zkx14

Member
Dec 31, 2015
113
South Central PA
Here is the re-designed inner top. A little extra detailing here since it was the problem and is most important to proper stove function. . Center baffle bolts in first, aligning the groove for the baffle gasket. Used 3/4 long screw and thick 1inch dia washers. Using anti-seize on all screws throughout. Cement the cap while positioning the distributer on locator 'pin', then lock it down with one screw. Be sure to seal the area between the neck of the distributer and the cast so all the air goes to the center. Assembling this ahead of time allowed the air distributer to get set in the cement.
Glue gasket in place and then set the damper plate on it while it dries. Wood under it was to steady it while I placed the gasket (3/8"). Not a big deal, but this was the most difficult gasket to keep in place because it does not seat into the groove as deep as all the others.
image.jpeg image.jpeg
 
Last edited:

Stelcom66

Feeling the Heat
Nov 6, 2014
454
Connecticut
Thanks for the information. I believe I have the Dutchwest 2461 (bought used);.One of the things that's great about this stove is the side door. With my previous small stove it could maybe accommodate a log 16" long at the most. I think the 2461 will accept up to 22".
 
  • Like
Reactions: Zkx14

Zkx14

Member
Dec 31, 2015
113
South Central PA
Thanks for the information. I believe I have the Dutchwest 2461 (bought used);.One of the things that's great about this stove is the side door. With my previous small stove it could maybe accommodate a log 16" long at the most. I think the 2461 will accept up to 22".
Yes, the side door is the way to load these. Front access mostly helps to get things where you want them, and for starting. Side to side the 2462 is about 25" inside.
 

Zkx14

Member
Dec 31, 2015
113
South Central PA
Im done assembling the body of the stove, time for a break. here's what I did so far.
First I dry fit the whole thing. Most of the pics are from the dry run. This allowed me to keep moving once I started with the cement. Right off the bat, I had a problem with the end of the air channel sticking out too far. I used a square to verify and evened it up with a grinder. Also pictured, I forgot to mention I had to make a notch where it overlaps the new style baffle. image.jpeg image.jpeg
 
Last edited:

Stelcom66

Feeling the Heat
Nov 6, 2014
454
Connecticut
Yes, the side door is the way to load these. Front access mostly helps to get things where you want them, and for starting. Side to side the 2462 is about 25" inside.
Wow 25" - that's great. When your done it'll probably be like brand new. It looks like it is now. How often do you replace the combustor?
 

Zkx14

Member
Dec 31, 2015
113
South Central PA
Now's the best chance you will ever have to check if the legs are tight...
Cementing. I cleaned everything previously by chipping out the cement with hammer and chisels (1/4"- 3/8") and wire wheel on a drill. I used Rutland metal to metal furnace cement in caulk tubes. Dampen all contact points with a sponge or rag. Apply a generous bead in the groove. Since this is a double wall stove, you only need to cement the inner box. So, there are only a couple spots where you need to be concerned about cleaning up any excess that squeezes out.
 
Last edited:

Zkx14

Member
Dec 31, 2015
113
South Central PA
Wow 25" - that's great. When your done it'll probably be like brand new. It looks like it is now. How often do you replace the combustor?
I don't recall exactly, but the one in it last was at least 3 years old. It was partialy crushed and repaired with furnace cement and still worked. When the top section doesn't heat right, its time to clean or replace it.
 

Zkx14

Member
Dec 31, 2015
113
South Central PA
Assembing the box. Put cement on base, set inner base and start the two bolts but leave them loose for now..
Cement across the back of the inner base and grooves in the left side. Set the left side in place.. Leave it angled out with a prop up. Then set the back plate.
image.jpeg

cement the groove on the underside of the inner top. Position it on the inner back and pull the left side in. It should support itself at this point, but I was not taking chances. A 2ft pipe clamp gave a little axtra insurance while I prepared the next piece.
image.jpeg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
84,265
South Puget Sound, WA
I don't recall exactly, but the one in it last was at least 3 years old. It was partialy crushed and repaired with furnace cement and still worked. When the top section doesn't heat right, its time to clean or replace it.
Are you considering trying a steel cat for this rebuild or a traditional ceramic?
 

Zkx14

Member
Dec 31, 2015
113
South Central PA
Now cement the right side and place it. A clamp across the top will hold everything together (not pictured). I decided to cement the air gap in the back corner. (questioned this on my first thread posted). The more I look into it I am nearly certain it serves no purpose. They just wanted to use the old style casting.
image.jpeg
 

Zkx14

Member
Dec 31, 2015
113
South Central PA
Back plate. I already put the chimney adapter on with a new 1/4" gasket. Area shown is the only thing on the back that needs cement. The bottom of the smoke shelf does not have a groove. I just laid a bead on it where it would mate up with the inner top. The remainder of the back is not part of the fire box so no cement needed. With it angled out at top, set the bottom edge in the base and tilt in. Put washers and nuts on and tighten. I used a hammer and wood block and tapped up and down the back corners to be sure it was seated before tightening all the way.
image.jpeg

With primary air manifold already bolted in place with new 5/16 gasket, cement all the tracks on the front. I was not sure what to do where the air adjuster rod passes through the cement. I decided to coat it with neversieze. So the cement should not stick and let it run free when dry. Set and attach front similar to back.
image.jpeg

Couple more things before I walk away...Tightened the 2 bolts in the inner base.
Check for squeezed out cement. I had some at bottom corners of the ash door. Also cleaned up the excess at smoke shelf. Used a putty knife and smoothed with a wet finger, leaving a nice corner bead. This should make cleaning up the smoke shelf easy without chance chipping it out.
Break time!
2016-01-02 15.40.51.jpg
 
Last edited:

Zkx14

Member
Dec 31, 2015
113
South Central PA
image.jpeg
Not quite ready to fire...
Got sidetracked yesterday, sort of - but it had to be done. Since I finally had all the parts out of the way, I decided to get some wood in. Now have half a cord in the basement ( thats where the stove is).
Even though it was our coldest day so far, today was painting day. Everyone but me is out of the house when I got home from work, till at least tomorrow. I taped the glass and brass. Set up fans and opened some windows.....
Used Rustoleum high heat barbeque black. Dries really fast. Then I ran a dry brush over it (I used a dust brush kinda like shoe shining) to bring up a slight sheen. Top looks diff in pic due to lighting.
Other than the obvious assembly, I also bolted the inner side and back plates in.
Also wanted to note gasket sizes I used. Side and ash doors 3/8. Front door and top 7/16. Glass was good, so not redone at this time. With the cost of that glass I ain't touching it till I must.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: kennyp2339

Zkx14

Member
Dec 31, 2015
113
South Central PA
I learned something today. Never knew the bypass door was supposed to lock down with a little more pull on the handle. It always seamed to stay closed under its own weight, so I never messed with the rusty adjusters. So now I got that all replaced and working very nicely. Also put in the new cat.
 

Attachments

Zkx14

Member
Dec 31, 2015
113
South Central PA
All fired up.
Got a small fire going. Good draft right away. Almost 400 on the side door. 900 cat. That should be a good first burn to fire the new cement. Looks nice and clean out the chimney. No Smoke in the house, but I am trying to air out a little stink from the fresh paint/pipes.
2016-01-05 18.59.46.jpg
 
Last edited:

twd000

Feeling the Heat
Aug 28, 2015
422
Southern New Hampshire
Thanks for an informative thread on the rebuild. I inherited the same 2462 stove with the house. This is my first year and I'm still getting used to it. I'll make sure to check the inner top plate for warping next time I have it opened up.

My stove is also in the basement like yours. Are you able to heat the upper floors of your house with this stove? It looks like your basement is unfinished. My basement is only 640 square feet, finished, and I find that running to stove got enough to keep the cat active overheats the basement and very little heat makes it up the staircase. Can you tell me about the fan you have installed? Does it just circulate heat throughout the basement?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Zkx14

begreen

Mooderator
Staff member
Nov 18, 2005
84,265
South Puget Sound, WA
Very nice rebuild and informative post. Thanks.
 

MaintenanceMan

Minister of Fire
Feb 25, 2010
524
Southern IN
Very interesting. Great write up.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Zkx14