First time wood burner and a new member.

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ruSSrt

New Member
Nov 21, 2023
25
Upstate South Carolina
Good afternoon everybody.

Just like many other posts starts, I'm new to wood burning for heat. I have a basic understanding of fireplaces/stoves and ideas behind what to burn to heat my house. Have been talking to local guys when I get my wood, visited couple of fireplace stores and asked questions. And as always, any questions I have about burning wood, google leads me right to this place.

A little bit about my set up.
I purchased a house that was built in 1966. It has original non fire brick lined fireplace that looks like was used for wood burning insert. Pipe is clay stove pipe lined. I don't know if insert is original to the house or if it was added/replaced at some point.
I had chimney and fireplace inspected and chimney liner is in great shape with no cracks in the brick and insert did not have any damage/cracks/rust or anything. There is no metal pipe liner, insert is just venting straight in to original chimney and out it goes.

I tried asking around to find out what kind of brand of insert I have and seems like no one can tell me. Would you guys happen to know what is it?
I have been burning in it for a month none-stop and main house heater have not kicked in yet. When it dropped in to low 30's I would turn on the blower and my house stayed above 70.
Also when it got inspected guy never mentioned anything about fire brick. I know all the new stoves have fire brick lining and I just never even thought about if this needs a fire brick. It does have a log holder and I usually have a nice bed of coals to keep heat inside and off the bottom.
As you can see, on the thermometer I try to keep it in "normal" 400-600 degree range. but I don't know how much should I trust that thermometer.
I have a pretty steady supply of wood and since it's my first year, I've been really keeping an eye on moisture content of it this year. Usually I burn 17%-22%. Mostly hardwood, but lately I've been mixing with pine, per advice I was given. I'll do one log of dry pine and 3-4 logs of hardwood and with damper closed and just a little bit of air intake open I can get 7-8 hours of burn with temperature not dropping below 400.
Do you have any other advice for me?

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Another question is if this is too much smoke? My stove is set up heating as I like it. About 500 on thermostat but this is how much smoke coming out. Should I expect to clean it every season?
 
Good afternoon everybody.

Just like many other posts starts, I'm new to wood burning for heat. I have a basic understanding of fireplaces/stoves and ideas behind what to burn to heat my house. Have been talking to local guys when I get my wood, visited couple of fireplace stores and asked questions. And as always, any questions I have about burning wood, google leads me right to this place.

A little bit about my set up.
I purchased a house that was built in 1966. It has original non fire brick lined fireplace that looks like was used for wood burning insert. Pipe is clay stove pipe lined. I don't know if insert is original to the house or if it was added/replaced at some point.
I had chimney and fireplace inspected and chimney liner is in great shape with no cracks in the brick and insert did not have any damage/cracks/rust or anything. There is no metal pipe liner, insert is just venting straight in to original chimney and out it goes.

I tried asking around to find out what kind of brand of insert I have and seems like no one can tell me. Would you guys happen to know what is it?
I have been burning in it for a month none-stop and main house heater have not kicked in yet. When it dropped in to low 30's I would turn on the blower and my house stayed above 70.
Also when it got inspected guy never mentioned anything about fire brick. I know all the new stoves have fire brick lining and I just never even thought about if this needs a fire brick. It does have a log holder and I usually have a nice bed of coals to keep heat inside and off the bottom.
As you can see, on the thermometer I try to keep it in "normal" 400-600 degree range. but I don't know how much should I trust that thermometer.
I have a pretty steady supply of wood and since it's my first year, I've been really keeping an eye on moisture content of it this year. Usually I burn 17%-22%. Mostly hardwood, but lately I've been mixing with pine, per advice I was given. I'll do one log of dry pine and 3-4 logs of hardwood and with damper closed and just a little bit of air intake open I can get 7-8 hours of burn with temperature not dropping below 400.
Do you have any other advice for me?

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My advice is stop using it until it's properly installed with a full liner. The way you are running it is dangerous
 
Not unless your stove is actually connected to those liners and not just slid into the fireplace. Also does your chimney have the required clearances to combustibles?
I can't definitively tell you if it is or not. But no concern was brought up to my attention when it was getting inspected. Also I changed the chimney cap to have one that has "finer" mesh (than what it had on it before) to catch if something flies out. If I remember correctly, when I was sup there it's about 4 feet from the peak to the top of the chimney.
 
I can't definitively tell you if it is or not. But no concern was brought up to my attention when it was getting inspected. Also I changed the chimney cap to have one that has "finer" mesh (than what it had on it before) to catch if something flies out. If I remember correctly, when I was sup there it's about 4 feet from the peak to the top of the chimney.
You need to have 2" of clearance from the outside of the masonry structure to any combustible materials.
 
I'm not sure about that. I might have to get it re-inspected and have a secondary opinion.
That's a good idea. And yes that is way to much smoke.

Also that is a buck stove or a copy of one
 
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